Cryogenic Chamber Therapy / Cold Adaptation

SeekinTruth

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

Shane said:
SeekinTruth said:
So it seems like you're joining Odyssey and a couple of others in this cold adaptation experiment. I did dumping huge buckets of cold water over my head in the shower a couple years ago. I forget what it was called, I read about it first on the forum here and there were a few links to other websites, I think. And it was mentioned that it's better than just taking cold showers. But I started with the cold shower so I could move out of the stream when it got too much in the beginning. The water out of the tap here is REALLY cold.
Not sure if this is the thread, but there is a short one called Tempering that discusses it a little bit. Another thing brought up in that thread is how Gurdjieff experienced his first moment of self remembering after dumping a bucket of cold water on his head.
Yes! That's it, Shane. Thanks for finding it. For some reason, I couldn't remember it was called "Tempering." And since I had read about Gurdjieff's first experience of self remembering after dumping cold water over his head, and that was mentioned in the thread, it made me more curious to try it back then.

So judging from what Psyche found so far, it seems like there's QUITE a bit of research done on this in the last few years.
 

Gaby

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

Just imagine the results if people would be on the paleo diet...

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Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2011 Sep;71(5):419-25. Epub 2011 May 16.

The effect of prolonged whole-body cryostimulation treatment with different amounts of sessions on chosen pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels in healthy men.

Lubkowska A, Szyguła Z, Chlubek D, Banfi G.


One of the advantages of whole-body cryostimulation in medicine, rehabilitation, sport and biological renewal is the provocation of systemic physiological responses that lead to a reduction in inflammatory reaction [1]. However, reports on the effects of cryogenic temperatures are often contradictory, mainly due to the differing number of treatments applied during the tests, differing durations of a single treatment, participation of people with various diseases in the study, and the lack of information about changes induced by cryogenic temperature in healthy patients [2–4].

Usually cryostimulations are performed at temperatures from −110°C to −160°C, depending on the available cryochamber. The most frequently used temperature is −130°C, relatively well tolerated by patients; the stimulation may then take from 2.5–3 minutes without complications, e.g. frostbite. Cryostimulation is usually performed once a day for 10 following days, but there is no sufficient information and research showing that this number is the most advantageous. In our previous studies, the most beneficial effects on the lipid profile induced by cryostimulation were observed after the application of 20 daily 3-min treatments [5]. Numerous studies confirm that short-term whole-body cold exposure induces an oxidative stress but does not decrease the antioxidant capacity [6–10]. Additionally it is known that hypothermia inhibits the expression of inflammatory mediators and induces expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines [11–13].

Cold is known to affect leukocyte mobilization, and it is suggested that cold exposure initiates changes in cytokine expression associated with a nonspecific acute phase reaction that could be the affect of multiple interactions between the cytokines and neuroendocrine hormones [14]. Despite a recently growing interest in cryostimulation, relatively little is known about the physiological modulation of the immune system, cytokine expression and their serum concentration by cryogenic temperatures, both as cryostimulation and as a cryotherapy. It seems important to know the influence of repeated exposure to the stress induced by cryogenic temperatures affecting the whole-body of healthy people in order to use this knowledge efficiently in clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to observe changes in the levels of cytokines under the influence of repeated systemic cryostimulation in young healthy men. In addition, it was examined whether there were differences in response to cryostimulation, depending on the daily number of applied treatments.

[...]

Discussion

Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is recommended for patients suffering from arthritis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, acute injury, trauma, chronic pain, and muscle spasms [1,2,15] and is widespread in the biological regeneration and rehabilitation of athletes to improve recovery from muscle injuries [4,16]. Recently we have observed a growing interest in cryostimulation as a method of prevention and treatment of obesity. Most of the aforementioned disorders are accompanied by acute or chronic, clinical or subclinical inflammation. At the same time still very little is known about the modulation of the human immune system, inflammatory mediator response, and cytokine expression and its serum or plasma levels by cryogenic temperatures.

The inflammatory reaction involves cells (migration, adhesion, diapedesis, chemotaxis) and humoral and immune responses associated with the release of C-reactive protein, complement proteins, interleukins, interferon and the synthesis of antibodies [17]. Cytokines, small-molecule proteins with autocrine, paracrine and endocrine action, are involved in the regulation of cell migration, inflammation, proliferation, hematopoiesis, lipolysis, and glucose homeostasis [18–21]. A dynamic balance exists between the proinflammatory cytokines and the anti-inflammatory components of the human immune system, and additionally almost all the anti-inflammatory cytokines, with the exception of a receptor (IL-1ra), have at least some proinflammatory properties [22]. Production of various pro-and and anti-inflammatory cytokines is upregulated rapidly in response to different forms of stress, e.g. exercise [23–27]. In this paper we analysed changes in the level of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α IL-12, IL-10 and the most important in immunological and cell regulation IL-6, which, although initially considered a pro-inflammatory mediator, is currently recognized mainly as an anti-inflammatory agent [28,29]. In this study it was found that stress induced by exposure to extremely low temperatures causes changes in the level of cytokines in healthy individuals. Particularly interesting is the fact that the increased levels of cytokines involved all the anti-inflammatory ones, most significantly IL-6.

This increase occurs even after the application of only five daily 3-min-long cryostimulations. In our previous studies, we observed increased levels of white blood cells in response to a series of 10 treatments and at the same time we showed that even a single, 3-min-long whole body exposure to cryogenic temperature (−130°C) leads to increased levels of interleukin-6 [30]. This is confirmed in this study. Because during cryostimulations an increase in circulating IL-6 is accompanied only by an increase in anti-inflammatory interleukin IL-10, without an increase in classical pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF α) the role of IL-6 in this case could be deemed anti-inflammatory. These dependencies resemble those induced by physical effort. It has been noticed that the anti-inflammatory effect of acute exercise displays as an increase in the level of circulating IL-6 with following IL-1ra and IL-10 rise [29]. It indicates that the activation of cytokine cascade after exposure to cryogenic temperatures, for example, during exercise is caused by a mechanism different to that during infection.

The accompanying reduction in the level of a proinflammatory interleukin IL-1α confirms the positive effect of this form of physical treatment and shows advantages of repeated exposure of the human body to low-level stress.

The observed increase in IL-10 may be a consequence of the increased secretion of IL-6. In vivo studies show that the administration recombinant interleukin-6 increases plasma IL-10, which in turn inhibits the release of both proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα [31] and chemokines, including IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein α (MIP α) from lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-activated human monocytes [32]. Additionally, anti-inflammatory effects of IL-6 are demonstrated by the stimulation of the production of IL-1ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), the release of soluble TNFα receptors, and down-regulation of the synthesis of IL-1 and TNFα [22,26,30]. Our research confirms earlier reports about no changes in pro-inflammatory interleukins IL-1β and TNFα after cryostimulation [3,15].

Our observations of immunostimulation and the protective action of cryostimulation are consistent with other reports. Banfi et al. [13] shows that whole body cryotherapy leads to an increase in anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 and a decrease in pro-inflammatory interleukin-2 and IL-8. Additionally, this author observed a decrease in sICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and prostaglandin E2 which intensify the anti-inflammatory response after cryostimulation [16]. It is also known that inflammation leads to an increase in the level of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. A question arises if such low temperatures as a stressogenic factor exacerbate inflammation in the body. It seems that this hypothesis can be rejected, as in such a case the increase would be chronic and significantly higher (2–3 times) [18,26].

IL-6 is produced by monocytes and macrophages, fibroblasts, T and B cells, endothelial cells, adipocytes and in the contracting skeletal muscle. A number of studies demonstrated that following exercise, the basal plasma IL-6 concentration may increase considerably, and the response is sensitive to exercise intensity and the muscle mass involved in the contractile activity [18,24,33]. Initially it was thought that an exercise-induced increase in IL-6 was a consequence of an immune response to local damage in the working muscles but nowadays it is clear that the contracting skeletal muscle per se is the main source of the IL-6 in the circulation in response to physical effort [25,26], and therefore IL-6 can be classified as a myokine [34,35].

Sudden exposure to cold induces physiological responses of the sympathetic nervous system, leading to minimized heat loss and the simultaneous increase in heat production (peripheral vascular spasm, and shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis) [36]. It can therefore be assumed that one of the possible causes of the increase in the aforementioned myokine during cryostimulation is the shivering thermogenesis during cryostimulation, based on involuntary repetitive rhythmic contractions of skeletal muscles. Shivering thermogenesis is activated in the first minutes of exposure to cold, initially in the muscles of the torso and limbs, and is assisted by the secretion of catecholamines [37]. The skeletal muscles do not have to be the only source of elevated IL-6. The adipose tissue may also contribute markedly to IL-6 increase in the circulation even during rest [2]. Additionally IL-6 mRNA levels increase in adipose tissue during exercise [38].

Some reports suggest that approximately 30% of circulating IL-6 comes from adipose tissue and that visceral adipose tissue secretes more IL-6 than subcutaneous adipose tissue [39]. It is recognized that obesity results in the secretion of TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6, and these cytokines are secreted both from adipocytes and macrophages within the adipose tissue bed [2].

There have been some reports about the relationship between BMI and the level of C-reactive proteins (CRP), and between BMI and IL-6 [32,40,41]. In our study, we checked if there were relationships between body weight, BMI and the level of the examined cytokines. The results were very interesting. When examining the initial values and after the series of five treatments, there were no such correlations, but the series of 10 and 20 cryostimulations resulted in the emergence of significant and positive correlations between the levels of IL-6 and IL-12 and BMI. The correlation coefficients between IL-6 and BMI were respectively: r = 0.8 after 10 treatments and r = 0.6 after 20 sessions, correlation between IL-12 and BMI: r = 0.68 and r = 0.64 after 20 stimulations (Table III). This may indicate the role of adipose tissue in the synthesis of these cytokines during exposure to cold. Our earlier studies on the effects of whole-body cryostimulation on lipid profile in healthy subjects have shown that the use of only 10 and most preferably 20 treatments produces beneficial changes in lipid fractions, which were not observed after five treatments [5]. Il-6 is identified as a modulator of fat metabolisms in humans, increasing lypolysis and fat oxidation without causing hypertriacylglycerolemia [42]. As observed in this study, the beneficial effect of cryostimulation – the increased levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines – continued only during the series of cryostimulations, but was not visible 2 weeks after the series of treatments, regardless of their number. The effect of reduced proinflammatory IL-1α, observed during the series of 5, 10 or 20 treatments, was only observed after the end of the series of 20 treatments.

In order to observe the probable delayed effect of cryostimulation, in group A (five treatments) blood was taken after a period of 5 weeks, and in group B (10 treatments) after 4 weeks from the last treatment. At the same time blood was taken 2 weeks after the end of 20 treatments in Group C. Cytokine levels observed in groups A and B nullified assumptions about the long-term delayed effect of cryostimulation. Therefore in accordance with earlier observations, it seems that the series of 20 daily 3-min-long cryostimulations is more advantageous than the routinely used series of 10 treatments.
 

Gaby

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Effects of the whole-body cryotherapy on a total antioxidative status and activities of some antioxidative enzymes in blood of patients with multiple sclerosis-preliminary study

Elzbieta Miller1), Malgorzata Mrowicka2), Katarzyna Malinowska2), Krystian Zolynski3) and Józef Kedziora2)

1) III General Hospital in Lódz, Poland, Rehabilitation Ward
2) Medical University of Lódz, Poland, Chair of Chemistry and Clinical Biochemistry
3) Medical University of Lódz, Poland, Clinic of Orthopedition and Traumatology

http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jmi/57/1,2/168/_pdf

Hypothermia has long been known as a potent putative neuroprotectant. It delays energy depletion, reduces intracellular acidosis and ischemia, related to the accumulation of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, and attenuates the influx of intracellular calcium. [...] It also suppresses mechanisms of blood-brain barrier degeneration and postischemic remodeling.

Treatment using total immersion of the body in extremely low temperatures was first introduced in Japan towards the end of the 1970s by Yamauchi T who constructed the first cryogenic chamber and successfully used cryotherapy to treat rheumatism.
 

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2734249/?tool=pubmed

Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz). 2008 Jan-Feb;56(1):63-8.

Whole-body cryotherapy as adjunct treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders.

Rymaszewska J, Ramsey D, Chładzińska-Kiejna S., Department of Psychiatry, Wrocław Medical University

Treatment using total immersion of the body in extremely low temperatures was first introduced in Japan towards the end of the 1970s by Prof. Toshiro Yamauchi [21], who constructed the first cryogenic chamber and successfully used cryotherapy to treat rheumatism. Whole-body cryotherapy (WBCT) is currently used to alleviate inflammation and pain in arthritis [2] and osteoarthritis [8] and for pain relief in fibromyalgia [10, 17]. WBCT has been found useful in neurological diseases in reducing spasticity [20], as a method of kinesitherapy in rheumatic diseases and multiple sclerosis, and for its sedative effect in psoriasis and neurodermatitis [2].

It has already been demonstrated that WBCT applied for short times stimulates physiological reactions of an organism which result in analgesic, anti-swelling, and hormonal, immune, and circulatory system reactions [14, 18, 23]. When the time of exposure to extremely low temperatures is strictly controlled, cryotherapy does not cause any significant reactions from the circulatory system and is thus safe [18]. Cryogenic chamber treatment does not affect heart rate, blood pressure, or left ventricle fractional shortening index and its ejection, or cause arrhythmia and ischemic changes of the heart [22]. Although WBCT may induce a transient bronchodilatory effect [1], the results of Smolander et al. [19] did not support the hypothesis that the WBCT improves lung function. WBCT induced minor bronchoconstriction in healthy humans and therefore it did not seem to be harmful to lung function. However, WBCT should be applied with caution in susceptible individuals, such as asthmatics.

The only animal study assessed the effect of short exposure to extremely low temperature on some plasma and liver enzymes in rats [12]. Statistically significant increases in the activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, sorbitol dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, and arginase were observed in the plasma and liver. The results indicate the influence of low temperature on liver metabolism, which may lead to changes in the metabolism of drugs.

Apart from activating the body’s system of temperature regulation, there is also a hormonal response, which increases body metabolism and the concentrations of adrenaline, noradrenaline, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisone, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and β-endorphins in blood plasma as well as male testosterone levels [15, 23]. In a recent study assessing blood serum concentrations of selected steroid hormones in professional football players subjected to WBCT, the authors suggested that it leads to a significant decrease in serum testosterone and estradiol, with no effect on dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and luteinizing hormone levels. The changes observed are probably due to cryotherapy-induced changes in the blood supply to the skin and subcutaneous tissue as well as to modulation of the activity of aromatase, which is responsible for the conversion of testosterone and androstendione to estrogens [7].

POMC is the source of several important biologically active substances, such as ACTH in the anterior pituitary gland and melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and β-endorphin in the intermediate lobe. α-MSH has a role in the regulation of appetite and sexual behavior. {This is related to Dr. Jack Kruse theory of temperature's role on the brain which is related to leptin} One neurobiological hypothesis of depression is based largely on dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The brain’s opioid peptide systems are known to play an important role in motivation, emotion, attachment behavior, response to stress and pain, and the control of food intake [9]. The positive effects of WBCT in treating both external and internal pain are due to the activation of the endogenous opioid system and “pain control system” [15]. It is possible that such a multi-system reaction could play a role in the treatment of mental disorders [16]. WBCT is successfully used in clinical work in several countries; however, very limited data are available.

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that WBCT may be a novel adjunctive therapy for affective and anxiety disorders. [...]

A positive effect was already observable after one week of treatment and improvements continued to be significant over the whole three-week cycle of cryotherapy. A significant improvement, taken to be a decrease of at least 50% from the baseline severity of symptoms, was observed in almost half of the study group and only in one case in the control group. Analysis of the long-term observations will indicate whether this effect is long lasting. Even if the follow-up results indicate that the long-term effects of treatment are the same in both groups, the rapid initial improvement achieved using cryotherapy means that such adjunctive treatment may be of value.

The physiological mechanisms of WBCT mentioned in the Introduction, particularly those associated with the HPA axis and endogenous opioids, can be an explanation of the positive effect of WBCT on mood. Other unknown or unrecognized phenomena may be associated with the WBCT effect.

There is a possibility that WBCT only improves several symptoms among the many psychopathological phenomena associated with depressive or anxiety disorders. It can be suspected that WBCT provides pain relief and regulation of biological rhythms, which are common symptoms accompany emotional disorders; however, these hypotheses need to be confirmed in further studies.

Nevertheless, despite the positive results of the study, we are aware of its limitations. Among these one should mention the small sample size and the lack of a procedure randomly assigning patients to a group. We should also note the problem of recruiting patients to undergo a novel, unknown treatment requiring daily mobilization and adaptation to the rigors of a research program. Further studies are being planned involving such methods as neuro-imaging and biochemical measures with the aim of clarifying the effect of WBCT on mental health. There is ever-increasing interest in non-pharmacological strategies to treat depressive disorders. Several approaches are currently being investigated as novel forms of therapy and may well constitute new effective treatments for major depression.
 

Gaby

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Want to know how it goes?:

http://www.cryotechno.com/project/resources/apps/gbanfi-et-al-_-wholebody-cryotherapy-in-athletes.pdf

Exposure to WBC is usually for 2 minutes, but in some protocols it lasts 3 minutes. Exposure can be performed with a single subject, but entry of a small group of subjects, up to four, in the same chamber is permitted. Each participant’s entry to the cryochamber is preceded by 30 seconds of temperature adaptation in a vestibule at atemperature of -60C. During the exposure, the subjects have minimal clothing and to avoid frostbite they wear shorts (bathing suit), socks, clogs or shoes, surgical mask, gloves, and a hat (or head band) covering the auricles. Any sweat is removed from the subjects before entering the cryochamber, where the air is clear and dry. While in the cryochamber, thes ubjects have to move their fingers and legs and avoid holding their breath. The system is automatically controlled, but safety personnel are always present (figure1).
Alright then, I think my biggest fear is that an earthquake will occur and the doors will lock or something like that...

http://www.cryotechno.com/project/resources/apps/tarja-westerlund-thermal-circulatory-and-neuromuscular-responses-to-wholebody-cryotherapy.pdf

During WBC, the skin temperature decreases rapidly due to vasoconstriction
and direct skin cooling, most profoundly in the extremities. It should be noted that
at an extremely cold ambient temperature of –110 °C, frostbite might be
anticipated to occur. However, only very limited data is available in regards to
actual body temperatures. Taghawinejad et al. (1989a) registered a slight decrease
(0.38 °C) in oral temperature after WBC (−100 °C, 90 s) and Joch et al. (2002)
found that the ear canal temperature changed by 0–0.2 °C from the initial
temperature. Savalli et al. (2006) observed a decrease (0.63 °C) in ear
temperature after 5 minutes of WBC (−110 °C, 4 minutes), but the change was
not significant after 20 minutes. The lowest skin temperatures (9.0 °C) were
measured on the calf (Savalli et al. 2006). According to these few studies, the
effect of WBC on the core temperature seems to be minimal. To the best of our
knowledge, data related to changes in skin temperatures during or after WBC are
lacking.

[...]

It is known that people with chronic and cold-sensitive diseases are at special risk
for exacerbations or complications of their diseases, when exposed to the cold. In
most of these conditions, the underlying mechanism is believed to be primarily
vascular (Caplan 1999). Patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases,
especially arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, are prone to coronary
artery spasm in response to the cold
(Houdas et al. 1992). In Finland, some 3500
extra deaths occur in winter, of which 900 are certified as being due to coronary
heart disease and 500 to strokes (Näyhä 2002). In Raynaud’s phenomenon, the
blood vessels constrict and the blood supply to these areas is reduced when
exposed to the cold. The vasopasm results in several changes in skin colour, from
white (ischemic) to blue (cyanotic) and finally to red (hyperaemic) (Caplan 1999).
Therefore, patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon are most susceptible to frostbite
in cold environments.
In Finland, 11.6% of adults suffer from Raynaud’s disease
(Rytkönen et al. 2005). Cold-induced urticaria is a form of physical urtcaria,
where hives or large welts form on the skin after exposure to a cold stimulus.
Such exposure may vary from local contact to whole-body exposure. The etiology
of cold urticaria is usually unknown (idiopathic), but sometimes a disease or other
factors are associated with it (secondary) (Mahmoudi 2001). Hassi et al. (2000)
has reported that the incidence of cold-induced urtcaria is 4%. The respiratory
responses commonly associated with sudden exposure to cold are gasping, an
increase in ventilation and bronchoconstriction (Keatinge & Nadel, 1965;
Josenhans et al., 1969; Berk et al., 1987; Koskela & Tukiainen, 1995). A cold
exposure may therefore be harmful for asthmatic patients
(Haas et al. 1986).

[...]

In WBC, the human body is exposed to very cold air (−110 °C) in minimal
clothing. Therefore, frostbites might be anticipated to occur. However, neither
literature nor clinical experience has reported frostbite occurring during WBC.


[...]

In this study, the main observations were that skin temperatures decreased
very rapidly, especially in unprotected extremities. However, they remained at
such a high level that there was no risk of frostbite. Because literature contains no
reported data on skin temperatures during WBC, the results of the present study
can be compared with studies on local cold therapy (e.g. frozen gel, dry ice, ice
massage). The comparison indicates that WBC is a more intensive exposure than
local therapies. [...]

Conclusions

The main findings and conclusions of the present study are as follows:

1. WBC (−110 °C, 2 minutes) involves no risk of frostbite, if the persons stand
rather still.
The lowest local skin temperatures were recorded on the forearm,
5.2 °C, and on the calf, 5.3 °C. After WBC, all skin temperatures recovered
rapidly, indicating that the temperature dependent analgetic effects of WBC
only occur during a limited period after the exposure. Thus, if WBC is used
for therapeutic means, the exercises should be done immediately after the
WBC.

2. Repeated exposures to WBC in healthy women were mostly well tolerated
and comfortable.
This may be due to the short exposure times without
significant core cooling with concomitant autonomic effector responses
and/or psychological factors. The results indicate that during repeated severe
whole-body cold stress of short durations, thermal sensations and comfort
become habituated during the first exposures.

3. WBC increased the average levels of blood pressure temporarily, but the
variation of the individual responses was vast. The magnitude of the increase
is however supposed to be safe for healthy persons. Neither significant
gender differences nor adaptation in blood pressures were found during or
after repeated WBC.

4. The observed acute increase in the high frequency power (HFP) of RR-
intervals induced by WBC indicates an increase in cardiac parasympathetic
modulation
. After three months of repeated WBC, the increase in the
parasympathetic tone was attenuated, which may be interpreted as an
adaptation of the autonomic function. The repeated WBC exposures related to
an increase in resting the low frequency power (LFP) of RR-intervals during
the three months resembles the response induced by exercise training.
Although we have no information on the maximal heart rate response during
WBC, we are inclined to suggest that the WBC is safe and even beneficial for
the autonomic functions of healthy people.

5. Neuromuscular adaptation may take place, especially in dynamic
performance, after three months of repeated exposure (3 times a week) to
WBC. A single WBC decreased flight time in drop-jump exercise. However,
after repeated WBC, these changes almost disappeared. This adaptation was
confirmed by the change of the activity of the agonist muscle, which
increased more, and by the change of the activity of the antagonist muscle,
which increased less or did not change after repeated WBC. This indicates
reduced co-contraction and neuromuscular adaptation. If the same type of
adaptation of neuromuscular functions occurs in patients, it might reduce
their pain and stiffness and allow them to perform the therapeutic exercises
more effectively after repeated exposures to WBC. To confirm this
hypothesis, further studies are required.
 

Jones

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I was curious about what it would take to build a Cryogenic Chamber and found this:

http://kriokomory.pl/doc/oferta_en.pdf

Some of it seems to be written in Polish?

My line of thought was that if travelling to facilities to get the treatment is not possible, then perhaps a small room in a house or outbuilding could be converted into a Cryogenic Chamber?

Also, there are mobile refrigeration units and these can often be hired from party supply places. I'm not sure if these meet the necessary specifications of Cryogenic Chambers or of the costs involved though.
 

LQB

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Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

Jones said:
Also, there are mobile refrigeration units and these can often be hired from party supply places. I'm not sure if these meet the necessary specifications of Cryogenic Chambers or of the costs involved though.
Some of these units (designed for long term meat storage) go well down into negative degree territory and can be surprisingly cheap (used). Once they come down to temp, the amps draw is fairly low, depending on size. The one I'm thinking about is not designed to be mobile, but is moved fairly easily by trailer.
 

Laura

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LQB said:
Jones said:
Also, there are mobile refrigeration units and these can often be hired from party supply places. I'm not sure if these meet the necessary specifications of Cryogenic Chambers or of the costs involved though.
Some of these units (designed for long term meat storage) go well down into negative degree territory and can be surprisingly cheap (used). Once they come down to temp, the amps draw is fairly low, depending on size. The one I'm thinking about is not designed to be mobile, but is moved fairly easily by trailer.
Don't think they'll do. Freezers for food usually only get down to -18 C or so. What the therapy entails is temps below -110 C...

BUT, that's not to say that such a unit could not be converted to therapeutic use. I would just not want to do it because I'd want safety exits involved there! I mean, a few minutes too long and that's all she wrote!
 

Possibility of Being

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Jones said:
I was curious about what it would take to build a Cryogenic Chamber and found this:

http://kriokomory.pl/doc/oferta_en.pdf

Some of it seems to be written in Polish?
Yup. Those are references, testimonials, certificates, diplomas, etc. If you go here:
http://kriokomory.pl/krioterapia.php?id=36

you can see pictures of the process of building a chamber.

And here you can see a 'cosmic' chamber

http://kriokomora.com/en/offer.html

with a PDF to download. Alternatively, see: http://www.cryochamber.co.uk/cryotherapy.html

Don't know about these particular producers, but from what I saw, price in Poland differs from 25,000 EUR to 70,000 EUR for a full body, 2-4 person chamber, and does not include transport and nitrogen.

Another thing to take into consideration is contraindications which may include:

According to CREATOR:

Contraindications for systemic cryotherapy:
• claustrophobia;
• Raynaud’s syndrome;
• hypothyroidism;
• the effects of certain drugs (particularly neuroleptics), and alcohol;
• a narrowing of valves: crescent-shaped aorta and mitral valve;
• chronic disease of the respiration system;
• marked wasting away of the organism;
• active cancer processes.
According to MAXimus:
THE STRICT CONTRAINDICATIONS :

The cryotherapy cannot be applied to the patients who suffer from

Cryoglobulinemia
Cryofibrinogenemia
Considerable anemia
Agammaglobulinemia
Raynaud's disease
Cold utricaria
Purulent advanced diseases
Diseases of the central nervous system
Neuropathy of the sympathetic system and paresis
Hypothyreosis
Local disorders of blood supply
Another site:

CASES WHICH MAY BE CONTRADICTORY TO THE APPLICATION OF GENERAL CRYOGENICS:

RELATIVE:

Above 65 years old
The history of vain thrombosis and embolism
Over sumptuous emotional liability expressed by acrohyperhidrosis

UNCONDITIONAL:

Serious heart and cardiovascular diseases (heart attack situation, coronary disease, heart rhythm, stenocardia)
Thyroid hypo function
Difficult respiratory system diseases
Tumour diseases and states of significant organism emaciation
Claustrophobia
Active tuberculosis process
Lack of tolerance to cold surroundings
Organism emaciation and hypothermia
The influence of alcohol and medicine from the neuroleptic group
 

Laura

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The Cryogenic Therapy is said to reset the Leptin thing. See: http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,26988.msg329988.html#msg329988
 

Gaby

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THE STRICT CONTRAINDICATIONS :

The cryotherapy cannot be applied to the patients who suffer from

Cryoglobulinemia
Cryofibrinogenemia
Considerable anemia
Agammaglobulinemia
Raynaud's disease
Cold utricaria
Purulent advanced diseases
Diseases of the central nervous system
Neuropathy of the sympathetic system and paresis
Hypothyreosis
Local disorders of blood supply
CASES WHICH MAY BE CONTRADICTORY TO THE APPLICATION OF GENERAL CRYOGENICS:

RELATIVE:

Above 65 years old
The history of vain thrombosis and embolism
Over sumptuous emotional liability expressed by acrohyperhidrosis

UNCONDITIONAL:

Serious heart and cardiovascular diseases (heart attack situation, coronary disease, heart rhythm, stenocardia)
Thyroid hypo function
Difficult respiratory system diseases
Tumour diseases and states of significant organism emaciation
Claustrophobia
Active tuberculosis process
Lack of tolerance to cold surroundings
Organism emaciation and hypothermia
The influence of alcohol and medicine from the neuroleptic group
All this contraindications point to ischemic problems triggered by cold due to underlying conditions/diseases. Note that they seem to be concerned with cancer patients not being able to endure the cold due to lack of reserve. Like I said in another thread, it is to say that the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effect might benefit people with cancer. From lack of studies, perhaps they prefer to be on the safe side because cryotherapy produces a strong reaction from the body and they don't want any trouble if the cancer continues its progression and/or spreads more. Kind of like a "why did you put my patient under this unnecessary stress? See what has happened?" kind of thing. Just a thought.

The rest of the contraindications listed in that document make sense in review of what I posted and highlighted on this thread:
• claustrophobia;
• Raynaud’s syndrome;
[vessels close down in response to cold]
• hypothyroidism;
`[they have intolerance to cold]
• the effects of certain drugs (particularly neuroleptics, and alcohol;
[endorphins get activated during cryotherapy]
• a narrowing of valves: crescent-shaped aorta and mitral valve;
[these people will have ischemic responses to cold]
• chronic disease of the respiration system;
[i.e. asthma triggered by cold]
• marked wasting away of the organism;
[lack of reserve to endure the cold]
• active cancer processes.

and so forth...
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

Laura said:
The Cryogenic Therapy is said to reset the Leptin thing. See: http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,26988.msg329988.html#msg329988
A cryotherapy paper supports what Dr. Kruse is saying, certain brain circuits are regulated by cold temperatures which then helps reset the leptin circuit. The key is ketogenic paleo diet and cold thermogenesis.

http://jackkruse.com/cold-thermogenesis-6-the-ancient-pathway/

The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the circadian pacemaker that monitors this dance between darkness and light and the seasonal cold and hot temperatures in our environment. Cold temperatures reverses all the normal biology that is used when the SCN is entrained to light. This metabolic trap door is huge for mammalian biochemistry. This is the only way to naturally way to enter this brain pathway now that we know of. When temperature becomes the dominant environmental trigger and not light cycles, the leptin receptor induces endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS) formation. This really should a dagger to any safe starch belief you still hold. Mother Nature is telling you this and not me. Are we clear?

NS: There is no safe starches in winter period because Mother Nature said so, not Dr. Kruse.
eNOS is very good indeed. I stumbled upon a good synthesis today:

http://thyroidbook.com/blog/nitric-oxide-modulation-for-autoimmune-disease/

Endothelial nitric oxide

Endothelial nitric oxide is found in the lining of blood vessels. It aids in tissue recovery and regeneration, enhances blood flow, dissolves plaques, and dilates blood vessels. One thing that dramatically activates endothelial nitric oxide is exercise [and cold!]. When you exercise, the increase in blood flow turns on the endothelial nitric oxide system, which helps dissolve plaque in the arteries.

Unfortunately, autoimmune disease often compromises this system, thus hindering the delivery of blood to body tissue.[8] This not only makes body tissue, such as the thyroid gland, more vulnerable to inflammation and destruction, but it also makes it more difficult for these tissues to recover and heal.

A weak endothelial nitric oxide system helps explain cold hands and feet, the loss of hair, weak nails prone to fungal infections, and other symptoms frequently found in conjunction with autoimmune diseases.

Poor blood flow robs the brain of blood, and hence oxygen and nutrients, and brain function deteriorates.

Poor blood flow to the digestive tract is one cause of leaky gut and poor gut function. Coupled with inflammation and poor glutathione activity, the person with a chronically activated autoimmune disease can never seem to repair her gut. This is why a strict autoimmune diet to protect the gut is necessary in these cases.

Overall, the research shows endothelial nitric oxide plays a big role in preventing and taming autoimmune disease, due to its inhibition of over activity of both the TH-1 and TH-2 systems.
Back to Dr. Kruse:

Remember, endothelial NOS (eNOS) are expressed in BAT [brown adipose tissue, the fat tissue that is rich in iron and is good]. Remember, step one, activation of eNOS by cold actually blocks the SCN from reacting to photic stimuli to entrain our circadian rhythms! So the cold turns off control of all circadian rhythms to light and uses temperature instead! This is another shocking surprise of cold thermogenesis! Can you say bye bye to safe starches now? If you are scientist, yes you can, and you will say no if you are a paleo dogmatist that enjoys your feelings, more than your health. The activation of eNOS seems to be tied to the cold environment and replace light as the entrainment molecule for biological rhythms in cold.

STEP 4: When cold is perceived by skin cold receptors over two weeks leptin is liberated from fat cells in massive quantities. Cold empties fats stores like like a fire empties a movie theater. It can occur even faster if the method of adaptation is controlled with metal. The modern Zeltiq procedure does this in 45 minutes in a medical office. The cold liberates leptin directly from white adipose tissue (WAT). Cold environments induce a long buried epigenetic program in all mammals that allows for WAT to convert to brown adipose tissues (BAT) to burn calories as free heat and not generate ATP or to increase ROS simultaneously. This allows us to age more slowly, while increasing our metabolism and ability to work on less calories all while burning fat to make heat to stay warm. We also lower our body fat while improving our body composition too! The cold temperatures also raises IGF-1 mRNA to increase Growth Hormone release tremendously. This increases autophagic efficiency and improves muscular and cardiac function quickly. It does this all without exercise!
Notice how he says that it is over 2 weeks of cold adaptation, but that technologies that use metal can do it in 45'. He hasn't looked into cryotherapy yet, but I think that 10 or 20 sessions of cryotherapy can be an equivalent, and who knows, perhaps better.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

Psyche said:
THE STRICT CONTRAINDICATIONS :

The cryotherapy cannot be applied to the patients who suffer from
[..]
Cold utricaria
[..]
Dr Kruse talked about this in his cold protocol as being an excess of omega 6/lack of omega 3.
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

Laura said:
LQB said:
Jones said:
Also, there are mobile refrigeration units and these can often be hired from party supply places. I'm not sure if these meet the necessary specifications of Cryogenic Chambers or of the costs involved though.
Some of these units (designed for long term meat storage) go well down into negative degree territory and can be surprisingly cheap (used). Once they come down to temp, the amps draw is fairly low, depending on size. The one I'm thinking about is not designed to be mobile, but is moved fairly easily by trailer.
Don't think they'll do. Freezers for food usually only get down to -18 C or so. What the therapy entails is temps below -110 C...

BUT, that's not to say that such a unit could not be converted to therapeutic use. I would just not want to do it because I'd want safety exits involved there! I mean, a few minutes too long and that's all she wrote!
True, but I'll bet you could mod the door too and build a small entry chamber that would eliminate any drafts at the entrance. And the last thing you want is for the fan to kick on while you're in there!! :scared:
 

anart

The Living Force
Re: Cryogenic Chamber Therapy

I did my first cryogenic chamber therapy session today. It was quite an experience (and very cold!). I was in a single person unit, so it wasn't very big, and you remain standing for the 2.5 to 3 minutes while the nitrogen jets blast intermittently. The jets are fairly close to the skin so the blasts are the most uncomfortable part. I started to shiver pretty much right away and threw some G-rated expletives out as the time wore on. ;) In hindsight, it was over pretty quickly, though my fight or flight response did kick in! They had me turn every ten seconds or so to make sure the blasts don't always hit the same area of skin. When I first got out I was very jittery from the adrenaline, hands were shaking, and my blood pressure had gone up about ten points, but after 20 or so minutes I became really calm. At this point (about an hour and a half after) my mood is very good and I physically feel very good, though more hungry than usual. The only other things I've noticed so far is that my hearing was super clear when I walked out of there and it still is, which is a little bizarre actually, and that the slight neck ache I had going in there is gone completely.

I have a few more sessions next week, so I'll be able to tell more after those, since one session is usually just a 'warm up' - though that phrase really doesn't apply!
 
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