Dog communicating through a custom sound board.

If dogs had hands they would probably learn sign language like primates can. Their ears and facial expression also communicates quite a range of emotions. Border Collies are crazy intelligent.
 
Hello All,

just found this thread about Dogs, and wish to you know one Dog Secret:

We (dogs) can see human side faces (left-righ) splited, so the simetry differences on both sides of face, allow Dogs to comprehend the State of Mood of any human being. Dogs make this focusing one eye on each half of the human face, and obviously the brain process these two images, in a sense that Dogs knowledge about human emotions (reactions), is much more better than any human can do each other.

please, see at "4min:40sec" of this video -- The Secret Life of the Dog

another secret ( not too secret ), is that humans can understand very well when a dog is barking to warn, to attack, to feel pain or fear, or to play, very clearly.

dogs and humans are evolutive partners on this planet (horses too)
🐶
 

Jones

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@Border Dog, that video confirms what I thought about dog owners and oxytocin, but the surprising thing is that they've compared the oxytocin peaks from interacting with dogs with that of a breast feeding mother! I decided not to have children, so I didn't think I'd get to experience that kind of bond - but maybe I have.

I thought that we read faces from left to right because that's the way we're taught to read books - habitual. So it's interesting that they say that dogs don't read the faces of other dogs from left to right, but they do read human faces from left to right - I wonder if that's something that they've picked up from us?
 
@Jones , great question !

one more thing I remember that worth to add, is that relation (to interpret human side faces) is unique to Dogs (with humans)

the researchers suspect that characteristic was implement on the DNA of Dogs, because its a innate skill present in all races.

the (suvivor-relation) species cooperations can be compared with some species of plants and insects, even birds (to benefit each other), so this creative and unique relation between Dogs and Humans, should be mapped on DNA of Dogs.
 

Keit

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And here's another recent research that shows that even "free-range" pooches are smart. ;-)


Dogs are one of the most common species to be found as pets and have been subjects of human curiosity, leading to extensive research on their socialization with humans. One of the dominant themes in dog cognition pertains to their capacity for understanding and responding to human referential gestures. The remarkable sociocognitive skills of pet dogs, while interacting with humans, is quite well established. However, studies regarding the free-ranging subpopulations are greatly lacking.

The interactions of these dogs with humans are quite complex and multidimensional. For the first time, we tested 160 adult free-ranging dogs to understand their ability to follow relatively complex human referential gestures using dynamic and momentary distal pointing cues. We found that these dogs are capable of following distal pointing cues from humans to locate hidden food rewards. However, approximately half of the population tested showed a lack of tendency to participate even after successful familiarization with the experimental setup. A closer inspection revealed that anxious behavioral states of the individuals were responsible for such an outcome.

Finally, we compared the results using data from an earlier study with dynamic proximal cues. We found that free-ranging dogs follow distal cues more accurately compared to proximal cue. We assume that life experiences with humans probably shape personalities of free-ranging dogs, which in turn influence their responsiveness to human communicative gestures.
 

Jones

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Some updates from Stella.

"At 5:50 AM Stella woke up, came out of the bedroom, and stretched over to her device to say, “Bed all done. Come outside." Stella narrated what was happening first by telling me she was all done sleeping. It always amazes me to see Stella communicating to share information, rather than just requesting things."


"One morning, Stella appeared upset so I asked, “Stella what’s wrong?” Stella said “mad,” and let out her frustrated little bark. I then asked, “Why are you mad?” and she responded, “Stella eat eat eat.” Since I didn’t leave for the day like usual, she didn’t get her typical morning snack. I gave Stella a treat like I normally would have, and she laid down and fell asleep. I’m so grateful Stella was able to express her needs in a different way to get them met."


"We moved to Illinois! Stella is adjusting to the snow, and to monitoring her new backyard!

In this video, Stella saw someone walking on the sidewalk and asked, “Who outside? Come come outside” then huffed and growled a bit. Stella does still bark when she sees passersby (especially as she’s adjusting to her new space), but sometimes she just asks who is out there.

On another day, Jake and I were outside talking to a friend and Stella was watching us from the window. When we came back in, Stella said “Who who who come?” wanting to know who came over."

 

Jones

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Stella's owner, Christine Hunger, has written a book that will be released in about 2 months:

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 8.21.30 pm.png

From the publisher:

The groundbreaking story of the world's first talking dog, the indispensable dog book for the new decade.

An incredible, revolutionary true story and surprisingly simple guide to teaching your dog to talk from speech-language pathologist Christina Hunger, who has taught her dog, Stella, to communicate using simple paw-sized buttons associated with different words.

When speech-language pathologist Christina Hunger first came home with her puppy, Stella, it didn't take long for her to start drawing connections between her job and her new pet. During the day, she worked with toddlers with significant delays in language development and used Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices to help them communicate. At night, she wondered: If dogs can understand words we say to them, shouldn't they be able to say words to us? Can dogs use AAC to communicate with humans?

Christina decided to put her theory to the test with Stella and started using a paw-sized button programmed with her voice to say the word ""outside"" when clicked, whenever she took Stella out of the house. A few years later, Stella now has a bank of more than thirty word buttons, and uses them daily either individually or together to create near-complete sentences.

How Stella Learned to Talk is part memoir and part how-to guide. It chronicles the journey Christina and Stella have taken together, from the day they met, to the day Stella ""spoke"" her first word, and the other breakthroughs they've had since. It also reveals the techniques Christina used to teach Stella, broken down into simple stages and actionable steps any dog owner can use to start communicating with their pets.

Filled with conversations that Stella and Christina have had, as well as the attention to developmental detail that only a speech-language pathologist could know, How Stella Learned to Talk will be the indispensable dog book for the new decade.
 

Tuulikki

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This is beyond amazing. Stella is quite incredible and I love the way she carefully negotiates between the buttons until she finds the ones she wants to press. How many times have we pet owners wondered what our furbies are trying to tell us - are they in pain, hungry etc. It would be great if it could work with cats but I think that might be a completely different kettle of fish. The cat would probably walk away with its head in the air and a superior look on its face - "that's just a game for stupid dogs"....😽
 

Yupo

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I work (or did, pre-Covid) at a place where some clients use a communication board. It is just wonderful how it opens up a world for understanding each other. So nice to see it being used with another species.
I remember reading about a family that raised an ape with sign language. The critter got very creative when needing words for thing that he didn't have words for. He called ketchup "Tomato Toothpaste" as I recall. Pretty bright! I would not have thought of that, but it makes sense.

My sister (recently deceased), was psychic. She rescued wildlife, mostly opossum. She told me they were well aware of the ones that had been there before, because they had left emotional scent markers for the future comers before their release. The message was that they would be safe and loved, to have no fear. She said the animals communicated this, and other things to her.
 

Yupo

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If dogs had hands they would probably learn sign language like primates can. Their ears and facial expression also communicates quite a range of emotions. Border Collies are crazy intelligent.
There's a novel called The Art of Racing in the Rain, about a dog who is obsessed with the belief that if he is good, he'll have opposable thumbs (be human) in his next life.
 

gottathink

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How many times have we pet owners wondered what our furbies are trying to tell us - are they in pain, hungry etc. It would be great if it could work with cats but I think that might be a completely different kettle of fish
I have paid close attention to learning how my cat communicates since she was a kitten.
When she is in pain she will tell me, with vocalisations and her body language.
when she is hungry she comes to fetch me and weaves back forth between my legs to lead me to the kitchen. When she wants meat she sits by the fridge, when she wants a freeze dried venison treat she sits by the cupboard. When I pull one out, she chirps and stands on her hind legs with her front legs on my thighs to tell me yes that’s it. If she actually wants one of her other treats she won’t put her paws on my thighs until I get the correct one out.
When she wants to play she will hide and then jump out at me and run away to hide again until I find her.
She collects bits and pieces of long stemmed plants or cords from the neighbours weed whacker that have flown off into garden. She brings these inside, I throw them for her. This game she expects every morning.
When she has caught a bug outside she brings it in and announces it. Then she releases it to play with. It flys up to the ceiling, she looks at us expectantly until we lift her up so she can reach the bug again with her paws.
I can invite her to sit on my lap by calling her name to get attention then visualising her jumping on my lap. She squeaks and pricks her ears when she has received the message and wants to sit on my lap. Then she comes and jumps on my lap for half an hour of cuddles and pats.
There are other ways we communicate, but the key message is paying attention to finding how to communicate with each other.
she uses her tail a lot , which is typical for cats. They also have more vocalisations than dogs, and only meow to communicate with humans. They do not meow in the wild.

It’s fascinating that domestic animals may be trying all the time to communicate with us. Paying attention and trying to learn their language is really a wonderful experience and activity.
 

gottathink

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Another thing my cat does, in the morning after I have let her outside she comes back to the door until I open it and then dashes away. I have to tell her, no I’m busy I can’t come outside, or go outside with her for a while. She repeats the behaviour a few times to insist I go outside or she gets the message I’m busy and stops.
It’s interesting because she wants me to be outside for a while in the morning. It’s good for me to get that morning daylight as I have trouble sleeping otherwise. I can’t help but think she is telling me what’s good for me.
This she does very often. It is a very clear message “you must come outside”.
 

Candice

Jedi
It would be great if it could work with cats but I think that might be a completely different kettle of fish. The cat would probably walk away with its head in the air and a superior look on its face - "that's just a game for stupid dogs"....😽

Hi @Tuulikki. I follow a cat on instragram (billispeaks) that has learned to use the board. Of course her favorite word is “mad” 😆.

 

Yupo

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Hi @Tuulikki. I follow a cat on instragram (billispeaks) that has learned to use the board. Of course her favorite word is “mad” 😆.

If cats had twitter, they'd be going on about how they got their stupid humans to believe they were seriously trying to communicate with them with the board. Really, they are just messing with their heads for the fun of it. Nothing gets em running like MAD!
 
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