EMF Exposure

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thanks for the help. I think I'll go with Cell Sensor for now.

LQB said:
hlat said:
Is this a GS power strip?
_http://www.stetzerizer-us.com/Power-Managed-8-Outlet-Energy-Controlled-Surge-Protector-with-Noise-Reduction_p_54.html
Yes on the GS powerstrip. It has 2 filters installed in there.
Something looks wrong about the powerstrip. The product description says, "It has 8 outlets on it, 3 of which are spaced far apart so that you can plug the 2 or 3 Stetzerizer filters into it." It makes me think it does not have built in filters, because otherwise why would we need to plug 2 or 3 filters into it?
 

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The Stetzerizer power strip is not available right now.
"I also used to sell the Stetzerizer power strip, which contained a larger filter, with capacitance equal to 2 of the regular filters. It was a very popular product, and people still ask for it all the time. Unfortunately the power strip was discontinued when Stetzer Electric switched factories, and the old factory kept the plastic molds. Doing it all over again would require a lot of cost and to go through safety certification from the beginning, so it is on hold right now. Hopefully a power strip or similar device will be made available in the future."
_http://www.stetzerizer-us.com/stetzer_fire_debunked.html
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
LQB said:
voyageur said:
Electrical Current on Plumbing Pipes

_http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2iejrZsXkM

As far as I know, current NEC code disallows use of home pipes for ground connections to the service panel box. These connections, if you have them, should be disconnected and re-routed to a properly installed ground rod away from any metal pipes servicing the home. In an urban (or even suburban) environment, ground current from neighboring homes and industry can travel on your home's metal pipes - so the fix described is a good one - just make sure you do it on the house side of any grounding connections so that ground current still has the path to ground (errors here are probably responsible for many cases of shock). This should be done for all metal pipes servicing the home (including gas).

The mag field due to net current on home pipes will be high and fairly long range due to the fact that it looks like a line source of current. If this were just a pure 60/50Hz signal, the health effects would probably be minimal to none. The problem is the high frequency grid noise that the mag field carries. This high frequency noise is difficult (and costly) to measure on the mag field. To measure this noise on the home grid, use the Stetzer or Greenwave meters.

I checked mine earlier, which contained a ground on the mainline water pipe that then went out the outside wall (or so I thought). Just checked it again, and darn, there is a ground wire leaving the panel that heads up into the ceiling and than over (slightly hidden) to the outside wall, just about where the wire described above leaves the mainline through the wall. So it's likely one and the same grounded to the mainline. I do have PEX above the mainline, so it can't travel around.

I'll get a grounding rod into the ground before it freezes and reroute the panel wire. Thanks for the comments LQB!
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
hlat said:
The Stetzerizer power strip is not available right now.
"I also used to sell the Stetzerizer power strip, which contained a larger filter, with capacitance equal to 2 of the regular filters. It was a very popular product, and people still ask for it all the time. Unfortunately the power strip was discontinued when Stetzer Electric switched factories, and the old factory kept the plastic molds. Doing it all over again would require a lot of cost and to go through safety certification from the beginning, so it is on hold right now. Hopefully a power strip or similar device will be made available in the future."
_http://www.stetzerizer-us.com/stetzer_fire_debunked.html

I see - I wasn't aware of this. The Stetzer power strips I got several years ago were equipped with internal filters, 6 sockets, and cost about $175.

What you can do is get the current Stetzer power strip and plug 2 Greenwave filters in.
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
voyageur said:
I'll get a grounding rod into the ground before it freezes and reroute the panel wire. Thanks for the comments LQB!

Be sure to install your new ground and connect it before you remove the old one. In this way the path to ground is always maintained.

Added: The reason you do this with care is that - although the neutral at the service entrance should provide a path to ground via the electric company, it may not be a good one due to corrosion and many other factors. So you leave the existing ground in place until you have the new one ready and connected. This eliminates the shock hazard. Be very careful in the panel box, wear insulated shoes (tennis shoes), and do not touch anything else that might have a path to ground. For complete safety, shut off the input power at the panel box before making any internal connections.
 

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
LQB said:
I use both meters and both filters, but if I had to choose, I would go Greenwave for both.
Do you think using both brands of filters is better than just Greenwave? Perhaps each one will catch something the other will not?
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
hlat said:
LQB said:
I use both meters and both filters, but if I had to choose, I would go Greenwave for both.
Do you think using both brands of filters is better than just Greenwave? Perhaps each one will catch something the other will not?

The Greenwave will get anything greater than about 300KHz where the Stetzer leaves off. Other than that, they are about the same.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
LQB said:
voyageur said:
I'll get a grounding rod into the ground before it freezes and reroute the panel wire. Thanks for the comments LQB!

Be sure to install your new ground and connect it before you remove the old one. In this way the path to ground is always maintained.

Added: The reason you do this with care is that - although the neutral at the service entrance should provide a path to ground via the electric company, it may not be a good one due to corrosion and many other factors. So you leave the existing ground in place until you have the new one ready and connected. This eliminates the shock hazard. Be very careful in the panel box, wear insulated shoes (tennis shoes), and do not touch anything else that might have a path to ground. For complete safety, shut off the input power at the panel box before making any internal connections.

Indeed, bought a copper splicing link, and once connected to the new ground rod, will only then sever the original connection. Good you mentioned this, very important to maintain the original connection until ready.

Fortunately, I don't have to mess with the panel box itself to finish this, and if so, would throw the main power bus switch off.
 

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I ran searches but it wouldn't find the post in this thread talking about keeping light bulb watts no greater than 30.

Spent last night going through the home and replacing all bulbs above 30 watts and all compact fluorescent, so now they are incandescent bulbs under 30 watts.

Decided to keep in simple and just get Greenwave filters and meter.
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
voyageur said:
Fortunately, I don't have to mess with the panel box itself to finish this, and if so, would throw the main power bus switch off.

I figured you would but I added that for the benefit of others that might run across the post. :)
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
hlat said:
I ran searches but it wouldn't find the post in this thread talking about keeping light bulb watts no greater than 30.

Spent last night going through the home and replacing all bulbs above 30 watts and all compact fluorescent, so now they are incandescent bulbs under 30 watts.

I don't know where that came from either - I wouldn't worry about regular incandescent bulbs - 30 watts is pretty low light (unless LED). The priority is to get all fluorescent fixtures/bulbs replaced.

The worst grid noise offenders are digital electronics and switching power supplies (used in variable speed appliances).

Its not a bad idea to begin moving to LED lights - especially if you want to use a small solar/battery system (in the future) to run lights and small appliances in case of grid failure. LED lighting has really improved over the last several years. The LED lights are grid-noisier (depending on design/manufacture) but easily under control with the filters.
 

mb

The Living Force
LQB said:
...I wouldn't worry about regular incandescent bulbs - 30 watts is pretty low light (unless LED). The priority is to get all fluorescent fixtures/bulbs replaced.

The worst grid noise offenders are digital electronics and switching power supplies (used in variable speed appliances).

Its not a bad idea to begin moving to LED lights - especially if you want to use a small solar/battery system (in the future) to run lights and small appliances in case of grid failure. LED lighting has really improved over the last several years. The LED lights are grid-noisier (depending on design/manufacture) but easily under control with the filters.

That's what we have been doing for the last year, because the LED lights last longer and don't contain mercury. The outdoor security lighting is almost all LED now, and most of the indoor lights are LED now as well. The exceptions are with fluorescent fixtures that will have to be replaced. We replaced one under-cupboard fluorescent tube with an LED strip light (after the ballast failed in the old fixture), and it is actually a bit on the bright side now, though the same or lower power. That can be a problem, since you don't really want to end up with bright lighting at night.

You definitely need the filters with LED lighting!
 

doublea1535

Jedi Council Member
LQB said:
Its not a bad idea to begin moving to LED lights - especially if you want to use a small solar/battery system (in the future) to run lights and small appliances in case of grid failure.

I stocked up on a bunch of LED lights for that reason, but I really don't like the light they put off (too unnatural), so I still run incandescent.
 

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Wow. The readings for the outlets in my house were around 600mV, and the filters got most of them down around 40-60mV. The two outlets in the kitchen near the outside circuit box and the refrigerator were higher at 107mV and 143mV. There are also 2 bedroom outlets higher at 85mV and 74 mV. I wanted to buy one of these adapters so I can plug two filters into those bedroom outlets. Will these adapters also help convert open ground outlets into grounded outlets?

_http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Grounded-6-Outlet-Tap-with-Resettable-Circuit-Breaker-White-56575/203744652
_http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-6-Outlet-Grounded-In-Wall-Adapter-White-54947/203742151
_http://www.homedepot.com/p/Defiant-GFCI-5-Outlet-Adapter-30339037/203741442
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
hlat said:
Wow. The readings for the outlets in my house were around 600mV, and the filters got most of them down around 40-60mV. The two outlets in the kitchen near the outside circuit box and the refrigerator were higher at 107mV and 143mV. There are also 2 bedroom outlets higher at 85mV and 74 mV. I wanted to buy one of these adapters so I can plug two filters into those bedroom outlets. Will these adapters also help convert open ground outlets into grounded outlets?

_http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Grounded-6-Outlet-Tap-with-Resettable-Circuit-Breaker-White-56575/203744652
_http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-6-Outlet-Grounded-In-Wall-Adapter-White-54947/203742151
_http://www.homedepot.com/p/Defiant-GFCI-5-Outlet-Adapter-30339037/203741442

Good deal on the reduction!

I'm not sure of your question. A grounded power strip will have a 3-pronged plug and 3-holed receptacles - so everything has the same house ground. Another nice thing about the GW filters is that they also filter the ground circuit - where the Stetzer filters do not.
 
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