From Scottie's Tech.info: These Q-Link things actually work?!

Woodsman

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I just ordered one of these, (mulberry silk beanie):


Wearing beanies is sort of in these days, though I'd rather not look like a hipster. When it comes to fashion, I'm generally repulsed by anything which might be seen as trendy. I've always felt that "trendy" can be loosely translated as, "lacking core identity".

But I guess for the sake of protecting my electromagnetic well being, I'll make the sacrifice.
 

Scottie

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I'd be MUCH more interested in knowing where and how the original inventor came up with the pendant design. Was it channeled information through some sort of medium, (like Reiki symbols)? Or was it the result of lots of theorizing and tests? What was the thought process? Did it make sense or was if full of bad assumptions? The sales website offers us nothing in this regard but slippery brochure copy which makes lots of airy fairy promises and seems kind of carpet baggy.
That's what I want to know, but alas...

I also find it fascinating how certain widely accepted "truths" which are based on "multiple independent peer-reviewed double-blind blah blah blah scientific studies"... are dead wrong. Or possibly dead wrong in some cases, in which case it's not a universal "truth" that has been unveiled.

Everyone's favorite example is smoking. You can read all the smoking studies with an internal bias and see what you want to see - and claim it's scientific. You can also read them with a more critical eye and see the gaping holes in them, and claim that your pro-smoking stance (at least in some cases) is also scientific.

Or, take my vids on 5G. The reason I state that a big huge thorough study is required is because, well, it IS required. At the same time, I know darn well that this will never actually happen. It would be too expensive, too long, too complicated, and it's too late anyway.

Much of science today is an utter joke. So, while ideally we would have actual thorough truly scientific studies about things, it generally doesn't happen that way. And even if it does, we as stupid humans will often get overly emotional about the topic in question, and apply what we've learned to everything. An example would be: I use the Q-Link. My experience turns out to effectively be a blind-ish study since I actually forget when I'm wearing it and not wearing it, but I note positive effects when I wear it, and negative effects when I don't. It helps. I therefore conclude that it's doing something, so, "YAY!"

But then I decide that it's magical, and it also cures cancer and will bring world peace. So I tell everyone it will fix anything and everything. Well, no, it won't. It works in some cases, but not others. Maybe it works for some things, but not others. Maybe there are 1 million different variables.

Ultimately, I figure that if people can believe so strongly in the "magic/science" of a dude(tte) in a white coat giving them a sugar pill that their disease will vanish, then the same thing can be applied without the dude in the white coat, the sugar pill, or massive medical bills.

As someone mentioned recently, there are even doctors who will not prescribe certain treatments for their patients if the patient doesn't believe in the treatment. Now that's a smart doctor...

What's even more interesting to me is the fact that to most people, science literally is magic because they don't personally understand any of it. They don't need firsthand knowledge or proof of how their gizmo works, or how their car moves, or whatever. But they do require detailed proof of anything and everything that is not accepted by the mainstream. When you think about it, that's really odd.

Well, in any case, it was certainly a fun experiment!
 

neonix

Jedi Master
This higher-dimensional space is composed of an energy, which has been called time-reversed waves, non-Hertzian waves, longitudinal waves, scalar waves, or zero-point energy.

The classical EM fields have been under investigation since the laws of Maxwell were established more than 150 years ago in England. We know all about the physical fields; we can generate, manipulate and use them for purposes such as long distance communication, computer applications and measurement techniques that are proliferating all around us. However, our knowledge regarding SE fields is expanding slowly. We present below a view of SE field generation based on some of the latest theories in quantum physics.

Dowser community promote the idea of "energy of shape". Some shapes or structures generate scalar waves, like spiral or pyramid. They also say that scalar waves could be bad or good for health. They say that electromagnetic devices and radioactive materials produce scalar waves. Some speculate that seashells or snail shells protect from EMF. And I also heard that seagrass and cork tree have some shielding capabilities. They also says that copper could have good impact on human body but it's hard to buy pure copper nowadays. If seashells works the same way it would be much more cheaper than $100 for a dongle.
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Another kind of evidence I might feel compelled by would be some kind of trusted meditation or psychic expert with a decent track record delving in on the topic and reporting back.
Yeah, we need to put one on Laura and hear what she says. :-)
 

Julius

Jedi
I'd be MUCH more interested in knowing where and how the original inventor came up with the pendant design. Was it channeled information through some sort of medium, (like Reiki symbols)? Or was it the result of lots of theorizing and tests? What was the thought process? Did it make sense or was if full of bad assumptions? The sales website offers us nothing in this regard but slippery brochure copy which makes lots of airy fairy promises and seems kind of carpet baggy.
I agree with the slippery brochure and airy fairy likeness of this product. But... sometimes there are good assumptions? Some intuitions lead to rewarding paths and some inventors can tune in to some objective science mental 'radio'.

What if QLink does nothing? nada! no improvement of etheric fields and filtering bad mojo. Just sits there with an imaginary humming when I look at it... :wow:
Maybe the inventor had good intentions and good heart, I don't know and the product doesn't seem to hurt. I guess we will join the pieces of another puzzle. I have made my own cooper spiral embedded in resin and some quartz. Cant tell if anything changed because I would have to control every other thousand parameters in my life to check if this one add an external effect. But I like the color of copper.
 
IIRC the Q Link is recommended to be worn over the heart area.

Thank you for the photo. I had a slight negative reaction to the polyester strand although that might just be my prejudice against synthetic fabrics. I have never liked them and try to avoid them if I can.

Some thoughts on the Q Link...

1. Physically and mechanically speaking... It looks like a coil of some kind; an antenna. That is, incoming radio wave energy would be absorbed and turned into an electromagnetic field plus heat. The heat part means that EM is transformed into an energy type which the body is perfectly suited to dealing with without ill effects. The electromagnetic field.., not so much. In any case, it would only count for the small region of space that the pendent occupies. Maybe if it's over the heart or some etheric center, it might have some impact, but it seems insignificant when you're bathed in EM waves of all sorts emanating from countless vectors. -For a Faraday Cage to work at blocking a signal, it needs to fully enclose an area. Scottie's experimental triple-lined foil box for cell phones is an apt example of this.

So in terms of traditionally understood EM field blocking, this pendant does zilch.

2. The stated beneficial effect, however, isn't about blocking EM. It's about absorbing and resonating a field which the human body supposedly naturally works best within. So it may be an enhanced field anchor, perhaps? If that is so, then it might be like adding a nutritional supplement to one's energy field, strengthening your immunity in general. -Like the way plants when they don't have enough minerals in the soil are more likely to suffer from the trials of life and disease. When you artificially add extra nutrients, they are better at fending off predators and other negatives.

3. Q Link Religion! -If there are thousands of people out there in the world actively believing in the protective qualities of the pendant, then maybe you're plugging into some sort of collective creative field..? Seems far out, and it's hard to gage, but why not? The C's told us once that a tsunami was the result of human collective creative energy being artificially repressed; "It has to go somewhere".

4. Somewhat off topic.., but I like the silk idea. With 5G millimeter waves, solid objects tend to reflect them. Here's a picture of a comparison of several common clothing fibers under a microscope:

View attachment 30768

Silk looks like it might be good at bouncing rather than absorbing.

I might look into wearing a silk-lined bandanna on my noggin.

Personally.., while I do find the resonance idea (#2) appealing in that it makes a kind of sense, it seems like a reach at the moment in need of a lot more supporting data. I generally don't trust necklaces and magic pendants bought on the internet. The Q Link site offers lots and lots of epidemiological and before/after subject studies, which frankly, is among the weakest kind of science available, (second perhaps only to climate science.)

I'd be MUCH more interested in knowing where and how the original inventor came up with the pendant design. Was it channeled information through some sort of medium, (like Reiki symbols)? Or was it the result of lots of theorizing and tests? What was the thought process? Did it make sense or was if full of bad assumptions? The sales website offers us nothing in this regard but slippery brochure copy which makes lots of airy fairy promises and seems kind of carpet baggy.

-Raw testimonials are next to useless unless people are reporting physical shocks, shrieking babies, shattered dishes and such; there's a certain threshold of reported phenomenon intensity which needs to be surpassed before I perk up and pay attention, and the kinds of soft experiential reports the Q Link has resulted in rate pretty low for me. (Except to determine the religiosity quotient, the honeymoon v buyer's remorse factor. Even if there is an effect, the average mystical crystal shop customer survey is about as convincing to me as.., something very unconvincing. People buy into all kinds of dumb crap, including orgone energy generators (for cloud busting of all goddamned things), Indigo Children and Scientology. It's an uphill chore to weed the roses from the CIA/Lizard-inspired crab grass.

Another kind of evidence I might feel compelled by would be some kind of trusted meditation or psychic expert with a decent track record delving in on the topic and reporting back.
 

munaychasumaq

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Interesting about the silk.Usually when i am in front of a computer reading,i can feel the electromagnetism of the device in my neck and chest and it is really unpleasant,so for that reason i wear a silk scarf that help me to deal with it.Maybe i have to use one of mulberry silk :wow:
 

Woodsman

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Interesting about the silk.Usually when i am in front of a computer reading,i can feel the electromagnetism of the device in my neck and chest and it is really unpleasant,so for that reason i wear a silk scarf that help me to deal with it.Maybe i have to use one of mulberry silk :wow:
I'm curious about silk, which is why I bought a few items, including some "Theremasilk" long johns and a long sleeved top.

I have one of those slightly higher end, (slightly) EM meters which faithfully gives good readings in my surroundings. It spikes when cell phones are active, and can read electromagnetic fields from electronics. etc. As a test, I wrapped it in my new silk long johns and tested it to see if it would read differently when near a cell device. It made no difference whatsoever.

I don't know if the silk was mulberry or not; "Thermasilk" is a recognized brand name, and they claim "100% pure silk" for whatever that's worth. The beanie I ordered is made from a much thicker knitted mesh and it claims to be mulberry silk. I'm not worried about it being fake; it's coming from a Japanese manufacturer; Japan is an established Westernized nation with far more solid market place ethics than some parts of the Chinese business world. Anyway, it's sort of like a woolen winter hat whereas the long johns are very thin; almost like woman's stockings. Sheer density of the fabric might make a difference.

But I'm also wondering...

5G millimeter waves and 4G meter waves are different animals. 4G penetrates things like walls and such, whereas 5G needs line of sight. Maybe the C's were thinking ahead and making recommendations based on technology they saw arriving in our future?

Anyway, we'll see.

I want to acquire a 5G EM meter when they become available. My current meter only reads up to around 3 Gigahertz, whereas 5G works up in the 30+ Gigahertz band. The best plan for minimizing toxic EM remains tactical awareness and implementing a 3 meter rule of thumb when out in public insofar as possible.
 
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luc

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
3. Q Link Religion! -If there are thousands of people out there in the world actively believing in the protective qualities of the pendant, then maybe you're plugging into some sort of collective creative field..? Seems far out, and it's hard to gage, but why not? The C's told us once that a tsunami was the result of human collective creative energy being artificially repressed; "It has to go somewhere".
Hm, why not indeed? That would fit with Sheldrake's morphic resonance, which I think is in many ways spot-on. I mean, if crystals form better, worse or not at all depending on how many other crystal "brethren" form in the same way all over the world, maybe if many people learn to be anti-EM-field-ninjas using the Q-Link as a reference point/starting point, maybe by wearing it, you "get into the groove" and become a ninja yourself :ninja:
 

lainey

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
If you're interested in buying a Q-Link I'd sign up for their newsletter. I bought mine years ago and they often send discount email codes during holidays.
Here is the link to the webpage. The newsletter sign-up part is at the bottom of the page. Q-Link Products

I was reading this thread on the train to work and my stop was coming up, so I stood up, turned around and there was a guy stood there holding a copper side-table. The legs had thin copper wire wound tightly round them which spiralled from top to bottom. Funny little coincidence. Ok, ok, I'll try one out already! :lol:
 

lainey

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I had a look at some of the other websites that talk about the Q-Link. This is what it looks like inside. A copper spiral, with some copper pads and what the internet tells me is a zero-ohm resistor in the middle.
They aren't linked up in a circuit, which got me thinking.
There is enough anecdotal evidence out there for me to believe it does something, yay. So the circuit-board-which-isn't-a-circuit, is that there because again, it does something which we don't quite understand yet, or is it there to make it look fancy when the actual working part is the copper wire spiral?
Could I get away with wearing a copper spiral round my neck?
Or do the crushed up crystals in the resin have a crucial role as well? Could I wear my protection crystal and a copper spiral next to each other and get a similar effect?
So many questions.
 

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