Fukushima-Fuel Rod Removal starts November..Danger!

horse

Jedi
Lest we forget what's in those pools, I knew unit 4 had damaged fuel rods so I know it's not empty. They're getting unit 3 ready. Buried under a pile of debris is unit 1. What's inside the fool's pools?

FUKUSHIMA Reactor 1 Spent Fuel Pool has 70 fuel assemblies with damaged fuel rods. Some 've been there for 40 years
http://ex-skf.blogspot.com.es/2013_11_10_archive.html
Fukushima I Nuke Plant Reactor 1 has 70 fuel assemblies damaged before the March 11, 2011 disaster

According to TEPCO, these 70 fuel assemblies had series of problems including leakage of radioactive materials from small [pinhole-size] holes [on fuel rods].

The damaged assemblies are about one-quarter of the 292 spent fuel assemblies stored in the pool. Technologies to remove damaged fuel haven't been established

Removing all the fuel possible should be done. They bet on semi-permanently storing damaged fuel in the old reactor pool but now the meltdown has produced a highly radioactive environment to work in.
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
TOKYO — While media attention has largely drifted away from the 2011 meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in the years since the disaster, a recent and disturbing development has once again made Fukushima difficult if not impossible to ignore.

2 Robots Crippled By Record Levels Of Radiation Leaking At Fukushima Daiichi
http://www.mintpressnews.com/2-robots-crippled-record-levels-radiation-leaking-fukushima-daiichi/225183/

February 24, 2017 - Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, quietly released a statement regarding the discovery of a hole measuring 2 meters in diameter within the metal grating at the bottom of the containment vessel in the plant’s No. 2 reactor.

http://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20170202/p2g/00m/0dm/087000c

Though news of this hole is indeed concerning, even more shocking was the associated jump in radiation detected in the area. According to estimates taken at the time of the hole’s discovery, radiation inside the reactor was found to have reached 530 sieverts per hour, a massive increase compared to the 73 sieverts per hour recorded after the disaster. To put these figures in perspective, NASA’s maximum amount of radiation exposure permitted for astronauts over their entire lifetime is 1 sievert.

Human exposure to 5 sieverts would kill half of those exposed within a month, while 10 sieverts would prove fatal to nearly all exposed within a matter of weeks. An official with Japan’s National Institute of Radiological Sciences told the Japan Times that medical professionals with the organization had never even considered working with such high levels of radiation.

TEPCO initially tried to counter public fears by stating that most of the reactor’s nuclear fuel remained in the containment vessel despite the hole. However, on Feb. 3, TEPCO spokesman Yuichi Okamura was quoted as saying that “it’s highly possible that melted fuel leaked through.” At the time, TEPCO said that it would send a robot into the area to survey the full extent of the damage in order to definitively determine whether fuel had leaked outside of the reactor into the surrounding environment.

The first robot, deployed on Feb. 16, was unable to conduct any meaningful measurements, as the extreme conditions within the reactor forced operators to abandon it within the containment vessel. The “scorpion” robot, manufactured by Toshiba, was meant to record images of the reactor’s interior and collect accurate — instead of estimated — data on the levels of radiation within. Within three hours of deployment, the device stopped responding to operators despite its stated ability to withstand high levels of radiation. TEPCO has not commented on its new plans to gauge the damage recently uncovered in the reactor in the wake of the robot’s malfunction.

When a second robot was sent to investigate, it also failed.

http://www.theverge.com/2017/2/17/14652274/fukushima-nuclear-robot-power-plant-radiation-decomission-tepco
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
angelburst29 said:
TOKYO — While media attention has largely drifted away from the 2011 meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in the years since the disaster, a recent and disturbing development has once again made Fukushima difficult if not impossible to ignore.

2 Robots Crippled By Record Levels Of Radiation Leaking At Fukushima Daiichi
http://www.mintpressnews.com/2-robots-crippled-record-levels-radiation-leaking-fukushima-daiichi/225183/

February 24, 2017 - Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, quietly released a statement regarding the discovery of a hole measuring 2 meters in diameter within the metal grating at the bottom of the containment vessel in the plant’s No. 2 reactor.

http://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20170202/p2g/00m/0dm/087000c

Though news of this hole is indeed concerning, even more shocking was the associated jump in radiation detected in the area. According to estimates taken at the time of the hole’s discovery, radiation inside the reactor was found to have reached 530 sieverts per hour, a massive increase compared to the 73 sieverts per hour recorded after the disaster. To put these figures in perspective, NASA’s maximum amount of radiation exposure permitted for astronauts over their entire lifetime is 1 sievert.

Human exposure to 5 sieverts would kill half of those exposed within a month, while 10 sieverts would prove fatal to nearly all exposed within a matter of weeks. An official with Japan’s National Institute of Radiological Sciences told the Japan Times that medical professionals with the organization had never even considered working with such high levels of radiation.

TEPCO initially tried to counter public fears by stating that most of the reactor’s nuclear fuel remained in the containment vessel despite the hole. However, on Feb. 3, TEPCO spokesman Yuichi Okamura was quoted as saying that “it’s highly possible that melted fuel leaked through.” At the time, TEPCO said that it would send a robot into the area to survey the full extent of the damage in order to definitively determine whether fuel had leaked outside of the reactor into the surrounding environment.

The first robot, deployed on Feb. 16, was unable to conduct any meaningful measurements, as the extreme conditions within the reactor forced operators to abandon it within the containment vessel. The “scorpion” robot, manufactured by Toshiba, was meant to record images of the reactor’s interior and collect accurate — instead of estimated — data on the levels of radiation within. Within three hours of deployment, the device stopped responding to operators despite its stated ability to withstand high levels of radiation. TEPCO has not commented on its new plans to gauge the damage recently uncovered in the reactor in the wake of the robot’s malfunction.

When a second robot was sent to investigate, it also failed.

http://www.theverge.com/2017/2/17/14652274/fukushima-nuclear-robot-power-plant-radiation-decomission-tepco

Was reading an article on Wattsupwiththat a week ago regarding these robots (and the radiation levels themselves), was not sure what to make of it as it calls out fake stories and why - so don't know, yet here are their counter arguments according the guest, David Middleton who responded to the original articles author: _https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/02/17/fake-news-fukushima-edition/

Here is a sample on the robot issue that seemed to have originated from Reuters paraphrased by Popular Mechanics:

Fake News Item #3: “Fukushima’s radiation is so bad it’s even killing robots.”

Five years after Fukushima, the exclusion zone is in better shape, but still a mess. The area around its once functional nuclear reactors are by far the most inhospitable. So much so that the radiation even managed to kill robots that had been sent in to help clean up.

Five robots that have gone into the reactor in order to help remove spent fuel rods have failed to return, reports Reuters. The issue? The radiation levels are so high that the robot’s internals just melt. We’ve seen this happen before.

Naohiro Masuda, Tepco’s head of decommissioning, explained the difficulties the company faces in an interview. Not only do the robots tend to fail due to the failure of their wiring, but it’s also not easy to get replacements. These aren’t just off-the-shelf bots; they have to be designed specifically for the challenges of the particular building they enter, and that takes about two years of design.

[…]

Popular Mechanics

The response was "None of the robots have been “killed” by radiation…" The article seems to cite Bloomberg next:

Melted Nuclear Fuel Search Proceeds One Dead Robot at a Time

by Stephen Stapczynski and Emi Urabe
February 16, 2017

The latest robot seeking to find the 600 tons of nuclear fuel and debris that melted down six year ago in Japan’s wrecked Fukushima Dai-Ichi power plant met its end in less than a day.

The scorpion-shaped machine, built by Toshiba Corp., entered the No. 2 reactor core Thursday and stopped 3 meters (9.8 feet) short of a grate that would have provided a view of where fuel residue is suspected to have gathered. Two previous robots aborted similar missions after one got stuck in a gap and another was abandoned after finding no fuel in six days.

After spending most of the time since the 2011 disaster containing radiation and limiting ground water contamination, scientists still don’t have all the information they need for a cleanup that the Japanese government estimates will take four decades and cost 8 trillion yen ($70.6 billion). It’s not yet known if the fuel melted into or through the containment vessel’s concrete floor, and determining the fuel’s radioactivity and location is crucial to inventing the technology needed to remove it.

“The roadmap for removing the fuel is going to be long, 2020 and beyond,” Jacopo Buongiorno, a professor of nuclear science and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said in an e-mail. “The re-solidified fuel is likely stuck to the vessel wall and vessel internal structures. So the debris have to be cut, scooped, put into a sealed and shielded container and then extracted from the containment vessel. All done by robots.”

[…]

The machines are built with specially hardened parts and minimal electronic circuitry so that they can withstand radiation, if only for a few hours at a time. Thursday’s mission ended after the robot’s left roller-belt failed, according to Tokyo Electric, better known as Tepco. Even if it had returned, this robot, like all others so far designed to aid the search for the lost fuel, was expected to find its final resting place inside a reactor.

[…]

No. 2 Unit

On Thursday, Toshiba’s scorpion-like robot entered the reactor and stopped short of making it onto the containment vessel’s grate. While Tepco decided not to retrieve it, the company views the attempt as progress.

“We got a very good hint as to where the fuel could be from this entire expedition” Tepco official Yuichi Okamura said Thursday at a briefing in Tokyo. “I consider this a success, a big success.”

Tepco released images last month of a grate under the No. 2 reactor covered in black residue that may be the melted fuel — one of the strongest clues yet to its location. The company measured radiation levels of around 650 sieverts per hour through the sound-noise in the video, the highest so far recorded in the Fukushima complex.

[…]

The Hitachi and Toshiba robots are designed to handle 1,000 sieverts and no robot has yet been disabled due to radiation.

[…]

Because the No. 2 unit is the only one of the three reactors that didn’t experience a hydrogen explosion, there was no release into the atmosphere and radiation levels inside the core are higher compared to the other two units, according to the utility.

Bloomberg

Anyway, the article further goes on to look at each point from "TEPCO is dumping/pumping radioactive water into the ocean" to "The radiation level in the containment vessel… had reached 530 sieverts per hour.” Each needs to be viewed and cross referenced. Some of these rebuttals are from MSN sources, so that needs to be kept in mind.

It seems so difficult to get a handle on this, other than the fact that none of it is good in the short and even long term (particle decay periods) for our bbm and its already toxic inhabitants. From an engineering & physics perspective, some might venture to say it's a heck of dangerous method of creating energy to heat water for tea. The question might be, so why do we do it?

The science aside, being that it was what was in the main during the period when first envisioned, these reactors provide massive jobs from engineering to mechanical, electrical and materials manufacturing - and post operations as a business. Sadly, we became hooked without envisioning (or applying) workable alternatives; and I don't mean windmills.
 

horse

Jedi
voyageur said:
Anyway, the article further goes on to look at each point from "TEPCO is dumping/pumping radioactive water into the ocean" to "The radiation level in the containment vessel… had reached 530 sieverts per hour.” Each needs to be viewed and cross referenced. Some of these rebuttals are from MSN sources, so that needs to be kept in mind.

It seems so difficult to get a handle on this, other than the fact that none of it is good in the short and even long term (particle decay periods) for our bbm and its already toxic inhabitants. From an engineering & physics perspective, some might venture to say it's a heck of dangerous method of creating energy to heat water for tea. The question might be, so why do we do it?

The science aside, being that it was what was in the main during the period when first envisioned, these reactors provide massive jobs from engineering to mechanical, electrical and materials manufacturing - and post operations as a business. Sadly, we became hooked without envisioning (or applying) workable alternatives; and I don't mean windmills.

Voyageur, do they not know much or do they not tell us much? From what I've read the 530 Sv is not what they wanted to find. Tepco hopes most of the fuel is still up in the RPV of Unit 2. They are looking for a 1,000+ Sv to find the corium. The reading in the PCV might be corium lava splatter but the main melt location is still unknown. Is the hole in the grate a corium lava tube? If the melt dropped into the basemat did it melt thru into soil? Then the argument was; the ice wall finally froze enough to block the flow of water so the fuel melt might not have penetrated thru the basemat. Some think the melt is well below the level of the ice wall. The ice wall might also help slow the amount of contaminated water that Tepco has been treating and dumping for lack of storage. The state of the three molten cores depends on whether they're covered in water or not and whether they spread out or remain in a big blob. Radiation readings taken from the wells between the reactor basements and the permanent wall are reported each time as 'beta increased' and the highest readings are near unit 2. The minor technical victory of getting a robot close enough to take a reading in the PCV being a sensational news item might be cover for the problems Tepco faces preparing unit 3 for spent fuel removal. Tepco only reported that additional shielding was required but the project has faced multiple delays. Bad as the fuel melts are the spent fuel pools are the larger threat for another catastrophic release. The first use nuclear energy was put to was making bombs and making new man-made isotopes for bigger bombs. It wasn't cheap and required new industries to be created to even make it look affordable. Too big to fail, just like the banks.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
horse said:
voyageur said:
Anyway, the article further goes on to look at each point from "TEPCO is dumping/pumping radioactive water into the ocean" to "The radiation level in the containment vessel… had reached 530 sieverts per hour.” Each needs to be viewed and cross referenced. Some of these rebuttals are from MSN sources, so that needs to be kept in mind.

It seems so difficult to get a handle on this, other than the fact that none of it is good in the short and even long term (particle decay periods) for our bbm and its already toxic inhabitants. From an engineering & physics perspective, some might venture to say it's a heck of dangerous method of creating energy to heat water for tea. The question might be, so why do we do it?

The science aside, being that it was what was in the main during the period when first envisioned, these reactors provide massive jobs from engineering to mechanical, electrical and materials manufacturing - and post operations as a business. Sadly, we became hooked without envisioning (or applying) workable alternatives; and I don't mean windmills.

Voyageur, do they not know much or do they not tell us much? From what I've read the 530 Sv is not what they wanted to find. Tepco hopes most of the fuel is still up in the RPV of Unit 2. They are looking for a 1,000+ Sv to find the corium. The reading in the PCV might be corium lava splatter but the main melt location is still unknown. Is the hole in the grate a corium lava tube? If the melt dropped into the basemat did it melt thru into soil? Then the argument was; the ice wall finally froze enough to block the flow of water so the fuel melt might not have penetrated thru the basemat. Some think the melt is well below the level of the ice wall. The ice wall might also help slow the amount of contaminated water that Tepco has been treating and dumping for lack of storage. The state of the three molten cores depends on whether they're covered in water or not and whether they spread out or remain in a big blob. Radiation readings taken from the wells between the reactor basements and the permanent wall are reported each time as 'beta increased' and the highest readings are near unit 2. The minor technical victory of getting a robot close enough to take a reading in the PCV being a sensational news item might be cover for the problems Tepco faces preparing unit 3 for spent fuel removal. Tepco only reported that additional shielding was required but the project has faced multiple delays. Bad as the fuel melts are the spent fuel pools are the larger threat for another catastrophic release. The first use nuclear energy was put to was making bombs and making new man-made isotopes for bigger bombs. It wasn't cheap and required new industries to be created to even make it look affordable. Too big to fail, just like the banks.

The bolded part; yes, it might be that.

The part mentioned regarding Unit 2 (Safecast) stated:

It must be stressed that radiation in this area has not been measured before, and it was expected to be extremely high. While 530 Sv/hr is the highest measured so far at Fukushima Daiichi, it does not mean that levels there are rising, but that a previously unmeasurable high-radiation area has finally been measured. Similar remote investigations are being planned for Daiichi Units 1 and 3. We should not be surprised if even higher radiation levels are found there, but only actual measurements will tell. Unit 4 was defuelled at the time of the accident, and though the reactor building exploded and the spent fuel pool was dangerously exposed, it did not suffer a meltdown, so similar investigations are not being conducted.

So 1,000+ Sv or near there is indeed a possibility.

Whatever the case, it is a horrible reality, while information itself is guarded and does not well accommodate the true reality of the situation.

As for the banking part at the end of what you said, was thinking about this last night when discussing "massive jobs" in the industry. Industrialized nations where reactors are built (provinces, states) often are initially government sponsored and owned and thus taxpayer built from the money borrowed from its banks. Later these nuclear reactor assets or sold off (pennies on the dollar) to the private sector to run. In other parts of the world (a list here , reactors are built near the same way with debt financing (banks, world bank, or IMF type loans to governments later used to build reactors) which creates a debt reality that is hard to pay back; so assets are leveraged (austerity) and again sold off to the private sector to run. In Japan:

History: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_Japan
In 1954, Japan budgeted 230 million yen for nuclear energy, marking the beginning of the program. The Atomic Energy Basic Law limited activities to only peaceful purposes.[26] The first nuclear reactor in Japan was built by the UK's GEC and was commissioned in 1966. In the 1970s, the first light water reactors were built in cooperation with American companies. These plants were bought from U.S. vendors such as General Electric and Westinghouse with contractual work done by Japanese companies, who would later get a license themselves to build similar plant designs. Developments in nuclear power since that time have seen contributions from Japanese companies and research institutes on the same level as the other big users of nuclear power. Between the early 1970s and today, the Japanese government promoted the siting of nuclear power plants through a variety of policy instruments involving soft social control and financial incentives.[27] By offering large subsidies and public works projects to rural communities and by using educational trips, junkets for local government officials, and OpEds written as news by pro-nuclear supporters, the central government won over the support of depopulating, hard-on-their-luck coastal towns and villages.

The IMF in 2015 has an article (with a green energy bent): http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2015/12/davis.htm

...Nuclear construction surged again in 2008 and 2009, and has continued despite the Fukushima accident in 2011. Currently, 70 nuclear reactors are under construction worldwide, about one-third of the construction volume at the peak in the late 1970s. Of these, 46 are in Asia, 15 in eastern Europe and Russia, and 5 in the United States. The biggest driver is China, with 26 reactors under construction and plans to begin construction on dozens of additional projects over the next decade.

Why are we not building more plants? Probably the most important explanation is construction costs. Building a nuclear power plant requires highly skilled, highly specialized architects and engineers to manage all stages of design, construction, assembly, and testing. And the sheer size of nuclear power plants means that most components must be specially designed and built, often with few suppliers worldwide. Moreover, the long time required for construction means that financing costs are substantial.
[...]
Is the world headed for a nuclear renaissance, with China leading the way? The turning point many have hoped for is not yet here. Construction costs are still too high and alternative technologies too cheap, and there is insufficient global commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions. A confluence of factors could make nuclear power a viable economic option. Otherwise, nuclear power will fall over time as a fraction of electricity generation.

The tragedy at Fukushima (originally preventable), with its downplayed hazard and obscured reporting in the news, should have resulted in a complete rethink along with an open discussion on fuel types, safeguards, locations etc. However, lessons learned does not seem to be at the fore of discourse and the world is stuck with a bad situation, especially in this newer cycle of planetary upheavals.
 

horse

Jedi
voyageur said:
The tragedy at Fukushima (originally preventable), with its downplayed hazard and obscured reporting in the news, should have resulted in a complete rethink along with an open discussion on fuel types, safeguards, locations etc. However, lessons learned does not seem to be at the fore of discourse and the world is stuck with a bad situation, especially in this newer cycle of planetary upheavals.

I agree with the quote except for the (originally preventable) part. When you consider the forces at play tragedy seems inevitable as we often only learn by making mistakes. Chernobyl contaminated half of Europe but it didn’t stop them. Fukushima alone didn’t cause this slow motion ELE. Will it be the straw that broke the camel’s back? The military, politicians, banks, and industry couldn’t pass up on nuclear’s promise of centralized power and control as well as a stick to threaten everyone else with; a group of self-reinforcing special interests leading the way.

http://issues.org/28-3/pfotenhauer/
The time has come to separate national economic and political interests in promoting nuclear power from the regulatory function, which concerns all nations. History suggests that significant changes in nuclear governance are both possible and desirable. For example, in 1974 the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission was split into the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration, with standard-setting delegated in part to the Environmental Protection Agency. This separation reflected the insight that the promotion and regulation of nuclear energy do not sit comfortably within the same body.

We conclude, first, that disasters are not caused by politics interfering with technology but are exacerbated by a spurious assumption that politics can be removed from technological design and the subsequent practices of technology policy. Room should be made for robust discussion of the politics of standard operation alongside the politics of breakdowns and disasters, including the questioning of outdated national narratives of justification. Second, the risks, benefits, and responsibilities of nuclear power have global as well as national ramifications. There is thus an urgent need for international regulatory oversight that separates nationalist goals for advanced technologies from the safe operation and maintenance of such technologies. Third, complex sociotechnical systems elude available methods of modeling and prediction, thus calling for greater humility in the reliance on models and more attention to the consequences of model failure.

Discussions have been held behind closed doors by the controlling interests and they acted. The public was not invited, informed, nor consulted and can only react to what they're told. Obviously, from my point of view, there is need for more discussion. Do as you will, aye, but harm ye none.

A: Cumulatively, it is already bad.

"..stuck with a bad situation, especially in this newer cycle of planetary upheavals."

Snow and ice may be the planet's response to technological pollution. More krypton and xenon in the upper atmosphere than should be. Inert 'noble gases' considered harmless because humans don't absorb them. When we learned that CFCs were bad for the ozone layer, we stopped adding CFCs and we can stop adding radio-krypton and radio-xenon. Quit leaking tritium, it destroys aquatic life. Earthquake zones are no place for Nuclear Power Plants. Japan must get better containment of the radionuclide pollution spewing out of Daiichi. The neighbors are noticing problems but Japan's nationalistic interests exclude paying for outside help. The nuclear industry has blackmailed us all into giving them money to mine, develop, and spread nuclear materials and technologies that will take seven generations to try to cleanup, adding more dead zones when man will be looking for better places to live.

I caught the SOTT podcast; good advice to take care of yourself.
https://www.sott.net/article/343589-The-Health-Wellness-Show-Cell-phones-vaccines-and-Fukushima-Oh-my

I’ve been detoxing with iodine for over a year, avoided the cell/smart phone epidemic, and haven’t had vaccines in years. I eat a high fat low carb diet and I smoke instead of popping pills. I don't eat seafood any more. I stay out of the rain and snow. I garden. I get away with it because I’m semi-retired, minding my own business. Six years ago I started seeing the Daiichi disaster unfold on the TEPCO site cameras. Life across the globe has taken another big hit and I saw it in my own backyard. Industrial accidents and toxins are accepted as the cost of doing business but life is struggling under the load. There's a lot of work ahead for any future generations.
 

horse

Jedi
Here's a detailed report of conditions at Daiichi.

SimplyInfo.Org Fukushima 6th Anniversary Report
http://www.fukuleaks.org/web/?p=16171
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
horse said:
Here's a detailed report of conditions at Daiichi.

SimplyInfo.Org Fukushima 6th Anniversary Report
http://www.fukuleaks.org/web/?p=16171

Interesting. I see from this same link you provided the following:

The Semi-Secret Plan To Tunnel Under Fukushima Daiichi

It's from March 10th, 2017, so will have to keep an eye on how this develops, if at all.
 

SummerLite

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I spent a good part of the day yesterday looking at youtube videos and othe sources on updates and scanned the link provided by horse just now. Specifically, I was looking for information about Hawaii and its not easy to find. One article explained there is a cover up going on as many in Hawaiian government are Japanese along with much of the population and also the tourist industry would be adversely affected if radiation studies and such are made public, plus the thick program of denial. Other sources say cancer in children is on the rise. Does anyone have any good information on what is happening in Hawaii? My search on the topic was set off by my daughter hinting at wanting to move there with her 2 children and me. At one time, pre-Fukushima, I would have been very enthused and start packing my bags for to live in Hawaii has always been a cherished dream of mine. But now, I think its become a "no go zone". How could Hawaii possibly be exempt from the radiation of Fukushima? With the mass die off in the Pacific, along the coast that we're seening, what is happening to Hawaii's sea life? What a tragedy, don't really have the words to describe the loss of Hawaii. :(
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
It will take what, 40 years to clean up the disaster? And hundreds or thousands of years for the levels to drop all around, assuming it is not still leaking? It's really a sign of the times and you kind of have to accept it for what it is. And that the Universe knows what it's doing. Maybe we shouldn't think so much 3rd Density, thinking about the body so much. Maybe just dodge the bullets you can, and remember everything we do counts.
 

BHelmet

The Living Force
SummerLite said:
I spent a good part of the day yesterday looking at youtube videos and othe sources on updates and scanned the link provided by horse just now. Specifically, I was looking for information about Hawaii and its not easy to find. One article explained there is a cover up going on as many in Hawaiian government are Japanese along with much of the population and also the tourist industry would be adversely affected if radiation studies and such are made public, plus the thick program of denial. Other sources say cancer in children is on the rise. Does anyone have any good information on what is happening in Hawaii? My search on the topic was set off by my daughter hinting at wanting to move there with her 2 children and me. At one time, pre-Fukushima, I would have been very enthused and start packing my bags for to live in Hawaii has always been a cherished dream of mine. But now, I think its become a "no go zone". How could Hawaii possibly be exempt from the radiation of Fukushima? With the mass die off in the Pacific, along the coast that we're seening, what is happening to Hawaii's sea life? What a tragedy, don't really have the words to describe the loss of Hawaii. :(

Hi SummerLite - Hawaii is a whole 'nother kettle of fish, to use a bad pun in this case. I lived there for 10 years. I have many friends there, some who are avid divers. I asked and so far no one has reported seeing any shocking decline in the sea life or sushi that glows in the dark. It all depends on the ocean currents and trade winds. But my thoughts are that it must be at least equal to the effects on the western USA. Your thought about tourism is probably right. And it is true there are many Japanese who hold high positions, although they only constitute a fraction of the total population. Each island is different but the overall breakdown is about a third asians however this includes a whole bunch of Filipinos, Chinese, Thai and Koreans (among others) along with the Japanese, so maybe about 12-15% Japanese max. Certainly there have been some die-offs of sea life reported. If you want any advice about moving there, I can offer a bunch.
 

horse

Jedi
@SummerLite, Stock at NukePro has info on Hawaii. Mahalo
https://nukeprofessional.blogspot.com/search?q=Hawaii

Yeah, he's not spotting as many whales as he used to. Contamination was spread and keeps spreading. No place is all that safe anymore. Hawaii may be no worse that the west coast of North America.

@3D Student
Found this interesting read from an artists point of view.

https://weadartists.org/tracking-our-atomic-legacy
THROUGH TRACKING THE INVISIBLE TRACES left behind by the nuclear weapons complex and its “peaceful” doppelganger, the nuclear energy industry, my visual artwork forms an archive of our shared atomic legacy. Radioactive waste is never disposed of; it is dispositioned – placed out of sight and out of mind. By visualizing this contamination through installations, videos, images and social-sculpture interventions, I shape this content by sharing information, raising awareness, and activating community participation in remediation and nonproliferation efforts.
...
Dispositions are temporary locations involving multiple sites and confluences of flows, they represent and embody temporary collocations of matter, environmental attitudes and values. Suspended in this turbulence we find millions of particles, some colliding, others softly slipping past one another, slipping through holes in the system. Millions of tons of contaminated earth and billions of gallons of radioactive fluids comprise these complex fields of toxicity. Isotopes moving through strata and time result in cancer clusters throughout the world.

If we don't change our intent and start sequestering radionuclides the Universe may just clean house for us, of us. What if what we can do here in 3rd Density lays the foundation for a 4th Density existence. Don't you want to tidy up a bit before you go? Maybe learn that some bullets are invisible and what it takes to dodge them. From the C's I get that nuclear can destroy the frequency and I get that we're trying to maintain the frequency. The consequences of the nuclear meltdowns will steadily get worse. It can't be cleaned up in 40 years. Steps to stop the leaking aren't being taken. Places that were paradise for life will become less habitable as contamination spreads to different areas. Fukushima is not stable and further disaster looms before we might graduate. The Universe knows what its doing but we don't and we have a lot to learn.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
SummerLite said:
I spent a good part of the day yesterday looking at youtube videos and othe sources on updates and scanned the link provided by horse just now. Specifically, I was looking for information about Hawaii and its not easy to find. One article explained there is a cover up going on as many in Hawaiian government are Japanese along with much of the population and also the tourist industry would be adversely affected if radiation studies and such are made public, plus the thick program of denial. Other sources say cancer in children is on the rise. Does anyone have any good information on what is happening in Hawaii? My search on the topic was set off by my daughter hinting at wanting to move there with her 2 children and me. At one time, pre-Fukushima, I would have been very enthused and start packing my bags for to live in Hawaii has always been a cherished dream of mine. But now, I think its become a "no go zone". How could Hawaii possibly be exempt from the radiation of Fukushima? With the mass die off in the Pacific, along the coast that we're seening, what is happening to Hawaii's sea life? What a tragedy, don't really have the words to describe the loss of Hawaii. :(

Hi SummerLite.

Although I don't have any particular data on Hawaii, this article is currently on SoTT whereby Dr. Helen Caldicott discusses Fukushima. Helen speaks in a Radio show (link in the article). Her message, as a physician related to radioactive toxins, is extensive, and she forewarns of further changes for those of us living in the Northern hemisphere. She lives in Boston and says that if things change further, she will up and leave to the Southern hemisphere - Australia (think this is where she is from originally).

Anyway, listened to her speak today and it is indeed a gloomy picture (keep at the Iodine).

As an aside for those interested in Helen, she had very respectful things to say in the show about Putin and Russia, was fully aware of the "coup" in the Ukraine along with the neo-Nazis (and who helped orchestrate it Obama/Clinton/Nuland et al.), although she is now very worried about Trump and the generals.
 

horse

Jedi
Fukushima: Radiation now reported in West Coast Tuna
March 14 2017
http://365reality.net/fukushima-radiation-now-reported-in-west-coast-tuna/
The potential for consistent, chronic exposures to even low levels of radiation through a variety of sources is what is truly risky here. It’s not just the fish or just swimming in the ocean or just drinking the water: it’s the exposure to all of these things on a regular basis that may indeed prove to be quite problematic.
Fukushima: First Images Emerge Of Radioactive Salmon In Canada
http://www.organicandhealthy.org/2017/02/fukushima-first-images-emerge-of.html#.WMfQkIQsV4d.twitter
According to the tests, the samples from the Oregon coast measured around 0.3 becquerels per cubic meter for cesium 134. This level of radiation was deemed safe and “not a risk to humans or the environment” by multiple researchers in both the US and Canada. Of course, we know better – there’s no such thing as safe amount of radiation for living organisms. Every exposure to radiation, no matter how small, increases our risk for cancer and other serious medical conditions…which is why we'll be avoiding salmon for a while.
I can try to minimize exposure to the toxins. No more fish means we weren't getting an important trace mineral. Iodine deficiency becomes a problem.

’a friend’ said:
Why wouldn't you tell the Doc about the iodine pills? Curious. But, I think I know why.

Doctors are not really interested in diet as a rule; they sell pills. The Lugol's 5% is liquid, measured by eyedropper for dosage. We are taking 16 drops a day; about 100mg. I do mine in 4 doses, wife in 2 doses. More than a suggested:

"LUGOL’S Dosing using 12% (if using 5%, double)
Normal weight person, no sickness: 5 drops per day."

One drop of the 5% equals 6.25 mg iodine

8 drops of 5% Lugol's is approximately 50mg

Much more than the MDR or RDA

http://drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Iodine_-_what_is_the_correct_daily_dose%3F
the recommended daily amount of iodine is 150 μg - that is to say a thousand fold less than the sort of doses that were used in the 19th century. Interest in iodine was re-awoken in 1993, when Gent demonstrated that 5mg a day of iodine is highly effective in the treatment of fibrocystic disease of the breast. A study in Japan showed that the average daily intake of iodine was 13.8mg (because of their high intake of seafood) and the Japanese have the lowest incidence of breast cancer in developed nations.
The 100mg dose is closer to a protective dose from radiation protection KI pills but the Lugol's solution is a much better balanced mixture of the iodine and iodide. The Japanese were somewhat protected with daily 14mg doses keeping their glands full of iodine. Americans have no such protection especially the Midwest with no iodine trace minerals. Now I might think that the medical profession has no interest in a healthy person. They make money selling their own potions for what ails you. Prevention or treatment, what's the right choice? They tell me exercise and don't smoke. They know about toxins but they won't tell you to stay out of traffic smog or don't drink the fluoridated water. You understand how important probiotics are to a healthy gut, Doctors don't know much about diet, and we're just beginning to understand which biotics are pro and what are bad. I will say in our personal experience that the iodine helps control the bad biotics and left the good ones to flourish. You wouldn't bother telling your doctor about your fermented dinner and I won't bother them with my dietary habits. Take care of yourself.

Inspirational message when history is repeating itself. Are you paying attention? There will be a price to pay for do nothing while under attack.

30 mins | Fukushima 6 Year: We Are Power.
Rad Chick – Published on Mar 11, 2017
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDEszs38vdU
 

SummerLite

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hello! Thanks to everyone for your very helpful replies to my question about Hawaii. I haven't been able to give my reply the time it needs so I'll likely get to that in a few days. :)
 
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