Gluten-free Recipes

Thomas Alan

The Living Force
Laura wrote EE forum: "I take my big mixer bowl and fill it half full of purified water from my RO. That's about 2.5 liters (about 10 cups). I then add 3 heaping teaspoons of baking powder (not soda), 3 rounded teaspoons of sea salt, 3 scoops of D-Ribose, 1 cup grape-seed oil. I start the mixer on slow and then add 1 kilo of buckwheat flour (8 or 9 cups). The mixture should be a bit thin.

I get my pan hot and put it on med to med high heat. I use duck fat to fry, but lard will do nicely. I make sure the pan is well-oiled so that the cake is crispy! I keep a cup of melted fat on the counter to re-oil the pan constantly while making a platter of blini! Don't be afraid of animal fats, but run for the hills if anyone suggests that you use vegetable oils!

I pour a big cooking spoonful on the pan - and more if the pan is big enough to make several at once (I have a special blini pan that makes four). Let cook until the edges are a nicely browned and then turn. I like mine darker than golden brown because then they are crispier.

Now, of course you can cook with less fat and have a softer, less crispy cake. Or you can make the batter thicker and have a fluffier cake. But for snacking purposes, the thin, crispy blini is perfect."





I made my first attempt at this today. I finally found non hydrogenated lard at a local Mexican grocery. The D-Ribose I found was very costly so didn't use it. But the flavor was ok, didn't need sweetening to my taste anyway.

The result tastes good, felt satisfying in the stomach. But it broke up in the pan. When I tried to turn it it crumbled.

I proportioned the ingredients down since it was just for me, used 1 cup of buckwheat flour, olive oil instead of grape seed oil. In using the amount of water needed the batter was very runny. Added more flour to make it thicker but still was quite liquid when I poured into the pan.

I used baking powder somewhere near proportion. What does the baking powder do? :huh:

When I do this again how can I get it to hold together better?

Never been much of cook. Takes time, but this was kind of fun.

Suddenly my kitchen and refrigerator are way to small! :D

Mac
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Mac said:
I used baking powder somewhere near proportion. What does the baking powder do? :huh:

The baking powder makes it rise. You don't need it for crepes because they are supposed to be thin.

Mac said:
When I do this again how can I get it to hold together better?

I'm not totally sure because sometimes when I add things to it it becomes all floppy and breaks apart too. But flax seed meal mixed in water, in a 3:1 Tbs. ratio water to flax, is supposed to be a binder. Also, tapioca flour makes things "gummy" so that might help to put in some, replacing maybe a third of the buckwheat.
 

Alana

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Trevrizent said:
Recently I discovered a new method of baking bread; a conventional recipe for Bastible Bread. A Bastible is an iron pot that was used as a pot over an open fire. For breads cooked this way the crusts are softer because of the steam trapped inside the pot. An equivalent Soda bread, with a similar soft crust may be cooked in a covered casserole in an oven.

My first attempt was a straight conversion of a ‘wheaten flour’ Bastible Bread.
Ingredients
400g Buckwheat flour
100g Tapioca flour
1tsp salt
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
450ml Buttermilk equivalent (Goats milk or Rice milk plus 2tbsp fresh lemon juice, set aside for 15mins)

Preheat a greased and lined 9.5in (24cm) casserole in the oven at 230C/450F/Gas Mk 8

Mix the flours in a large plastic food bag with the salt and bicarbonate of soda, and thoroughly mix by tossing around the flours in the bag.
Empty flour mix into a large mixing bowl and pour in all the ‘buttermilk equivalent’ and stir. The result was a very sloppy mix, certainly not a dough. So I added more flour, another 100g to get more ‘stiffness’; it was still quite pourable.
The mix was poured into the hot casserole and the lid put on, and baked for 45mins, or until a skewer comes out clean (it was probably cooked a lot earlier).

The result was beautiful, a soft and springy bread, much to my surprise!

Thank you so much for this recipe, Trevrizent! My roomate and i tried it out last night, and the bread was delicious! It seems that our pot is bigger, and we will need to double the doses for next time, plus maybe add a bit of ghee in it, because it didn't rise as much, but still, it was the best bread we made so far.

On the occasion, we made berry jam too. We boiled mixed berries, xylitol and a tiny bit o tapioca floor, for over an hour, and it was the perfect topping (over ghee) for our bread! It's been raining and snowing here these days, so a hot cocoa with rice milk was the ideal side drink for warming up our night :D
 

Thomas Alan

The Living Force
3D Student said:
Mac said:
I used baking powder somewhere near proportion. What does the baking powder do? :huh:

The baking powder makes it rise. You don't need it for crepes because they are supposed to be thin.

Mac said:
When I do this again how can I get it to hold together better?

I'm not totally sure because sometimes when I add things to it it becomes all floppy and breaks apart too. But flax seed meal mixed in water, in a 3:1 Tbs. ratio water to flax, is supposed to be a binder. Also, tapioca flour makes things "gummy" so that might help to put in some, replacing maybe a third of the buckwheat.

My second attempt turned out better. The result looks pretty much like pancakes. Tastes good. Probably used too much water the first time.

I like the taste of ground flaxseeds, so might try adding some next time.

Mac
 

Ollie

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Alana said:
Thank you so much for this recipe, Trevrizent! My roomate and i tried it out last night, and the bread was delicious! It seems that our pot is bigger, and we will need to double the doses for next time, plus maybe add a bit of ghee in it, because it didn't rise as much, but still, it was the best bread we made so far.

I’m glad that you liked this bread. I now make a smaller version, with similar proportions. In terms of rising, the second recipe,
Ingredients
1 3/4Cup (255g) Buckwheat flour
1/4Cup (33g) Tapioca flour
1tsp salt
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 1/2tsp cream of tartar
1tbsp butter, or ghee
1 egg lightly beaten – or left out for the egg free version
¾ Cup rice plus 1tbsp (205ml) rice milk or goats milk – or for the egg free version, ¾ Cup plus 2tbsp plus 1tsp (225ml)

You can use less liquid to make a dough that can be ‘shaped’, can cut a deep cross on it and prick the centre of the quadrants ‘to let the fairies out’. However, the sloppier the mix the better it is for Gluten-free flours.

As this Soda bread uses a smaller amount of flour, a 6in (15cm) cake tin was greased and lined with baking paper and place inside greased and lined 9.5in (24cm) casserole. The combination was preheated in the oven at 230C/450F/Gas Mk 8.

The dry ingredients were mixed in a large plastic food bag, and thoroughly mix by tossing around the flours in the bag. The flour mix was emptied into a large mixing bowl.
The lightly beaten egg was then incorporated into the flour mix, followed by the milk.
The mixture was poured into the hot cake tin inside the casserole, the lid put on, and baked for 20mins or until a skewer comes out clean.
rising slightly more, but not by a lot. Ghee will improve the keeping time and add a little more flavour to the original recipe you used. I enjoy both versions of the bastible bread. :D I make both versions using the cake tin within the casserole.
 

Ollie

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Fruit cake
This recipe started off as a sugar free fruit cake, however the results indicated a lack of moistness and lift, so I resorted to enhancing the proportions according to my mother’s ‘normal’ (gluten) recipe, that has stood the test of time.

Ingredients:
220g (1 1/2C) raisins
215g (1 1/2C) sultanas
20g (2 tbsp) dried cherries (add more to choice)
200ml (3/4 C plus1tbsp) water (minimum – add more to ‘pour’ mixture)
170g (3/4C plus 1tbsp) butter

175g (1 1/4C ) Buckwheat flour
50g (1/2C) Tapioca flour
1 ½ tsp Xylitol
2 tsp baking powder
2 tsp mixed spice

3 lightly beaten eggs (or substitute - 3tsp ground flaxseed soaked in 9tbsp water)
65ml (¼ cup) fruit juice (pineapple)

Add fruits, water and butter to a pan, bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes.
Allow mix to cool.

Pre-heat oven to 160C/325F/GMk 3

Mix the dry ingredients in a large plastic food bag and mix well to aerate mixture, and transfer to a large mixing bowl.
Add in cooled fruit mix and stir to combine as much flour as possible. Add lightly beaten eggs (or substitute) and stir, finally add in the fruit juice and stir. Depending on the final texture, you may wish to add more water to increase the ‘pour ability’ of the mix.

Double line an 8 inch (20mm) diameter cake tin (or 7 inch (18mm)square), double line the outside as well using brown paper (or foil), and add a bottom layer of greaseproof or parchment paper to the inside of the cake tin. This is to stop the cake from burning.

Bake for approximately 1 ½ hours at 160C. After ½ hour cover the top of the cake, leaving a slight gap, to stop the top burning. The cake is cooked when a skewer comes out clean.

Allow the cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before turning the cake out on to a wire rack for final cooling.
Wrap the cake in tin foil and leave overnight, storing it in an airtight container, before eating.

I’ve just baked one for my mother’s 90th birthday.
 

Ollie

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Fruit Tea Loaf/Bara Brith/ Barmbrack
This is a tea cake, in more senses than one, called a Fruit Tea Loaf in Yorkshire, Bara Brith in Wales, and Irish Tea Barmbrack in Ireland; all are variations on the same theme. The version of Bara Brith is the South Wales version, made without yeast. It is a rich tea bread, traditionally served sliced and buttered.

The variation from other fruit cakes is that the dried fruit is soaked in tea overnight to plump up the fruit, rather than boiling as in many other fruit cake preparation.

Ingredients:
175g (1 1/4Cup) raisins
175g (1 1/4 Cup) sultanas
250ml (1Cup) hot tea (I use 3-4 teabags of green tea – for the Thiamine)

1 egg lightly beaten or substitute (1tsp ground flaxseed soaked in 3tbsp water)
1 1/2tsp Xylitol
350g (2 1/3 Cup) Buckwheat flour
100g (1 Cup) Tapioca flour
1 1/2 tsp G-F baking powder
1 level tsp Xanthan Gum (optional)
2tsp mixed spice
Plus an additional amount of cold water to make up ‘strained tea’ to 440ml (1 3/4 Cup)

Place dried fruit in a bowl and pour over hot tea, cover and leave to soak overnight.

Pre-heat oven to 180C/350F/GMk 4

Drain off ‘tea’ and make up to 440ml (1 ¾ Cup) with water

Measure and mix flours in a large plastic food bag, along with the Xylitol, baking powder, mixed spice and Xanthan Gum (if used), and toss around to fully aerate the mix.
Pour flour mix into a large mixing bowl.

Add in lightly beaten egg (or substitute) and mstir to cover as much of the flour as possible. Add in the rest of the fluid in stages, allowing time for the absorption of water (G-F flours take time to absorb fluids).
Finally add in the fruit and stir.

Pour the mix into a large prepared (greased or lines) loaf tin, to two thirds full.

Cook in pre-heated oven for approximately 1 ¼ hours, or until a skewer comes out clean. For the last 20 minutes cover with parchment paper if the top becomes too brown.

Turn on to a wire rack to cool (covering with a tea towel to keep the crust soft).

Store in an airtight tin, it will keep for approx 5 days.
 

un chien anadolu

Jedi Master
Gluten Free Brown Rice Crackers

Made these yesterday and they turned out really delicious.I got the recipe from D'Adamo's website (http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1060) but I made some little changes.


Ingredients:

* 1 1/2 cups Brown Rice flour
* 2/3 cups cooked Brown Rice
* 1 Tbs Flax Seeds (optional)
* 1/4 tsp Sea Salt
* 1/4 cup compliant oil
* 1/3-1/2 cup Water



How to make it:

1. Preheat Oven to 375 (180 C°) degrees.Lightly oil a large baking sheet. In a bowl or food processor, mix flour, rice, flax seeds, salt and oil until combined. Add water a little at a time till dough holds together, try and make it not too sticky.
2. Pour onto floured surface and knead a few times to form a ball. Press or roll dough onto baking sheet. Score into 1 1/2 inch squares. Bake 20-25 minutes or until bottoms are golden brown. Break up in to pieces, serve with compliant cheese or dip.

I added 1 egg, 1 tbs baking powder, 1 1/2 tbs milled Flax Seeds, 1/2 cup fresh minced dill to the dough and finally coated the tops slightly with egg yellow and sprinkled black cumin seeds over them before baking.
Skip the egg if you are egg-intolerant.

27062010001y.jpg
 

Ollie

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Thanks for that - Gluten Free Brown Rice Crackers - n chien anadolu, I'll give both recipes a 'go', based around buckwheat.
 

un chien anadolu

Jedi Master
Trevrizent said:
Thanks for that - Gluten Free Brown Rice Crackers - n chien anadolu, I'll give both recipes a 'go', based around buckwheat.

You're welcome Trevrizent. I am type B and mostly prefer recipes with brown rice rather than buckwheat. So it made me happy that the result was good with such a simple recipe. I am sure it'll bring out a better result with buckwheat.
 

Ollie

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I took un chien anadolu’s G-F Brown Rice Crackers recipe and converted it into Buckwheat.

The first time I did the D’Adamo recipe with buckwheat, but it turned out rock hard – too much water possibly.

I then used the modified version and it turned out well, the crackers even keep well – 5 days plus in an air-tight tin. Just right for when you’re out walking in the hills.

Ingredients:
1 ½ Cup Buckwheat flour
2/3 Cup Buckwheat flakes
¼ tsp sea salt
¼ Cup Grapeseed oil
1 ½ tbsp ground flaxseed
1 tbsp baking powder

1 tbsp ground flaxseed soaked in 3 tbsp water (or 1 lightly beaten egg)
1/3 Cup water plus 1 tsp

Directions:
Preheat oven to 180C / 375F / Gas Mk 4

In a small bowl place the ground flaxseed and soak with 3 tbsp water, or alternatively lightly beat the egg in it.

Mix the rest of the dry ingredients in a large plastic bag and shake up to fully mix the ingredients.
Place the dry mixture into a large bowl, add the grapeseed oil and mix with your hands to incorporate, allow plenty of time for this, to get as much as possible of :)the dry ingredients involved. Add the soaked ground flaxseed (or lightly beaten egg) and mix with hands, again, mop up as much of the dry ingredients as possible.

Add 1/3 Cup water and mix with hands, allow time for the flour mix to absorb the water (G-F flours take longer to do this than conventional flour). Add more water if necessary, aim to keep the mixture dry rather than wet, as long as it forms a ball that holds together (however flimsily), or split the ball into two (as it’s easier to work with). If the mix gets too wet add more flour and allow time for it to get incorporated.
As this is basically a pastry mix, if there is too much water, then on baking the biscuit will go rock hard, and is inedible!

Tip – clean hands with dry flour (and add resultant scraps to the biscuit dough :)).

Take one of the balls and place it on a sheet of floured parchment paper on a flat surface. Squash the ball down with the heel of your hand to flatten it. Take another sheet of parchment paper and place over the flattened ball of dough. Roll the dough to fully flatten it to your desired thickness. Using a round cutter (6.5cm or 2 5/8in diameter) to cut out shapes (I got 14 in total per ball). Round up scraps, make into a ball, and repeat the above process. Place biscuit dough rounds on a greased baking tray or a tray covered with parchment paper. Repeat with the other biscuit dough ball.
Bake for 20-25 mins, until light brown in colour.

Cool biscuits and keep in an air-tight tin.

The mixture scales down well too, if required, the key element is the amount of water used.
 

annp

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Those crackers look great! Can hardly wait to try the recipe.

I have made the following recipe (from _http://wheat-free-meat-free.blogspot.com/2009/01/sesame-rosemary-crackers-gluten-free.html) a couple of times and these turned out really well. The only thing is that I have had to add a bit more liquid than the recipe calls for to get it to stick together well enough to roll out.

Sesame-Rosemary Crackers

1/2 cup sorghum flour
1/4 cup tapioca flour
1/4 cup pecans, finely chopped (I used my food processor to make them finely ground, almost into a coarse meal)

1/4 cup flax seeds
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/4 cup sesame seeds

2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp. dried rosemary, finely chopped
1 tsp. cider vinegar


Toast sesame seeds until golden and fragrant, about 5 minutes in a toaster oven or hot oven. Watch carefully so that they don't burn.

Soak flax seeds in 1/4 cup warm water for about 15 minutes, or until they have swollen to absorb the water.

In a medium mixing bowl, blend together sorghum, tapioca, pecans and salt. Add flax seeds, olive oil, sesame seeds, rosemary and cider vinegar and mix into a ball of dough. If dough is too dry, add a tsp. or two of warm water to make dough ball stick together. Divide dough ball in half.

Place a sheet of parchment paper on your counter and place first dough ball on top. Cover with another sheet of parchment paper. Roll with rolling pin to rough rectangular shape to fit a cookie sheet. I rolled this out to a little under 1/4 inch thickness. Remove top sheet of parchment paper and place bottom parchment layer and dough on cookie sheet. Score crackers into serving size with sharp knife or pizza cutter (about 1/5 x 2.5 inches).

Bake at 400 degrees F for 10 minutes, or until slightly brown at edges. While first batch is baking, roll out your second cracker batch as above.

Makes about 60 crackers. Once cooled, store in airtight container to keep fresh.
 

shijing

The Living Force
Just wanted to note that I tried out the cake and icing recipe in DCM #10 last weekend, and it turned out really well, so thank-you to the contributors! The only modifications I made were to add dried cranberries and a 100% cacao bar (half in the cake, half in the frosting). I also ran out of xylitol and had to make up the rest with sugar, which is the only thing I would do differently next time. But definitely :thup: for the recipe!
 

manitoban

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FOTCM Member
Shijing said:
Just wanted to note that I tried out the cake and icing recipe in DCM #10 last weekend, and it turned out really well, so thank-you to the contributors! The only modifications I made were to add dried cranberries and a 100% cacao bar (half in the cake, half in the frosting). I also ran out of xylitol and had to make up the rest with sugar, which is the only thing I would do differently next time. But definitely :thup: for the recipe!

Yeah!! I made the cake this week and it was delicious! Sinfully good actually! Big thank you!
 
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