Gluten-free Recipes

slowone

Jedi Master
Trevrizent said:
High energy protein bar
This may be used as a breakfast bar, or for the busy person or hiker, as a mid-morning snack or lunch. Makes 15 or 16 bars. I’ve been experimenting with this recipe for a while to finally arrive at this.

Ingredients:
100g (1 cup) buckwheat flakes
280ml (1 cup + 2 tbsp) red grape juice (I have also used apple juice, and apricot successfully)
115g (1/2 cup) butter or ghee (I have used both)
60g (1/4 cup) Xylitol
2 eggs (or any one of the several egg substitute formulas)
100g (3/4 cup) sunflower seeds, then chopped up
100g (3/4 cup) pumpkin seeds, then chopped up
100g (1 cup) flaked almonds, then chopped up
100g (3/4 cup) dried cranberries (or chopped dried figs, or …)
100g (1/2 cup) dried blueberries (or chopped dried dates, or …)
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp tumeric
1 tsp ginger

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Line a 20cm square baking tin, or 28cm x 18cm Swiss roll tin, with baking parchment.
Place buckwheat flakes in a bowl and pour over the red grape juice, leave to soak for at least 1 hour, until all the juice appears absorbed.
In a large bowl (this is the main mixing bowl), cream butter, add sugar, beat until pale, light and fluffy.
In another bowl, whisk eggs and gradually add to the creamed mixture, beat together until combined.
Fold in juice soaked buckwheat flakes, chopped almonds and seeds, berries, and spices.
Pour into lined tin, smooth surface with a palette knife.
Bake for 25 mins until golden brown.
Allow baked ‘cake’ to cool in the tin, and place in refrigerator before taking it out and cutting into bars.
Store in an airtight tin and use within 1 week, or freeze.

There is an egg-free, crunchier version than the above ‘cake mix’ (this version is taken from Seriously Good! Gluten-Free Cooking by Phil Vickery), as follows:

100g sunflower seeds
100g sesame seeds (I used chopped almonds)
100g pumpkin seeds
100g semi-dried cranberries
100g semi-dried blueberries
100g gluten-free porridge oats (I used buckwheat flakes)
2 tbsp soft brown sugar (I used Xylitol)
1 tsp ground cumin seeds
1tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground coriander
1x397g tin condensed milk
150g unsalted butter, cut into small cubes (I've used ghee here too)

(if the sugar is omitted, the texture will be slightly crumblier)
Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Line a 24cm square baking tin with baking parchment.
Place the seeds, fruit, oats, sugar and spices in a large bowl and mix well.
Put the condensed milk and butter into a bowl and place over a pan of gently simmering water. Melt together until well blended and hot. This will take about 15 minutes.
Stir the butter mixture into the fruit and seeds and mix really well.
Spoon the mixture into the tin and pack down with the back of the spoon.
Bake for 20 minutes, until slightly golden. Remove from the oven, cool and cut into bars.

I have yet to make this with a satisfactory substitute for the condensed milk.

However, I recently came across a plausible alternative in The AiA Gluten & Dairy Free Cookbook, Compiled by Marilyn Le Breton; as an alternative I have yet to see how well it works.
Sweetened condensed milk
½ cup Dari-Free (potato based milk powder substitute) + ¾ cup sugar + 2 tbsp dairy free margarine (could use ghee or butter here I guess) +1/2 tsp xanthan gum or guar gum.
Method
Mix all the ingredients together well.
Bring ingredients slowly to the boil, over a medium heat, stirring constantly.
Boil for 1 minute or until thick and bubbling, stirring constantly.
Chill liquid before adding to a recipe.

These both look great, Thanks for posting them . I find Breakfast tricky if I'm in a hurry and these would definitely help.

Would Coconut cream replace condensed milk if you can tolerate coconut? I might try I have a tin in the cupboard. If it works I'll report back.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Oh, god! Condensed milk is SOOOO evil! For everyone. And for me, the eggs and almonds are a no-go also.
 

Ollie

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
Oh, god! Condensed milk is SOOOO evil! For everyone. ...
I agree, that is why I worked on the other alternative (first) recipe, as I have yet to find an acceptable alternative to the condensed milk in the latter recipe.
 

Cazziea

The Force is Strong With This One
What yummy recipes! Here is one for the collection, but please forgive me if it isn't gluten free because I am not sure.

2 cups rice
half a cup of coconut
salt to taste

Grind together the rice and coconut. Make a thin batter and fry pancakes. This tastes great with tomato ketchup.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Have been meaning to post the gluten free bread recipe that my mum makes here for a while now.
Its from a book called "The Everyday Wheat-Free & Gluten-Free Cookbook" by Michelle Berriedale-Johnson

The original recipe in the book uses the following ingredients:

150g Potato Flower
150g Rice Flower
50g Buckwheat Flower
100g Fine Maize Flower
3tsp Soya Flour
1tsp Bicarbonate of Soda
2tsp Cream of Tartar
1tsp Sugar
3/4tsp Salt
1/2tbsp Butter
1 Large Egg (Beaten)
250ml Milk

However with my suggestion we have modified the ingredients to be as follows (hopefully to be 'evil' free):
150g Gram Flour
150g Rice Flower
50g Buckwheat Flower
100g Tapioca Flour
1tsp Bicarbonate of Soda
2tsp Cream of Tartar
3/4tsp Salt
1/2tbsp Butter
1 Large Egg (Beaten)
300ml Rice Milk

Recipe:

Heat the oven to 180oC/350oF/Gas Mark 4
Mix the flours together in a mixing bowl then mix in the other dry ingredients. Rub in the butter, then stir in the egg and milk, making sure that they are all thoroughly amalgamated.
Grease or oil a 15cm/6inch round cake tin or loaf tin (we use a loaf tin) and pour in the soda bread mixture. Or form into a circle on a greased baking try and cut a cross in the top. Bake in the centre of the oven for 45 - 50 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean.
Allow to cool slightly in the tin, cover with a tea cloth, then knock out carefully onto the rack. Cover with a tea cloth and allow to get completely cold before slicing.
 
G

Gertrudes

Guest
Thanks for the receipt Redfox! I'll get the ingredients this week.
 

slowone

Jedi Master
RedFox said:
Have been meaning to post the gluten free bread recipe that my mum makes here for a while now.
Its from a book called "The Everyday Wheat-Free & Gluten-Free Cookbook" by Michelle Berriedale-Johnson

The original recipe in the book uses the following ingredients:

150g Potato Flower
150g Rice Flower
50g Buckwheat Flower
100g Fine Maize Flower
3tsp Soya Flour
1tsp Bicarbonate of Soda
2tsp Cream of Tartar
1tsp Sugar
3/4tsp Salt
1/2tbsp Butter
1 Large Egg (Beaten)
250ml Milk

However with my suggestion we have modified the ingredients to be as follows (hopefully to be 'evil' free):
150g Gram Flour
150g Rice Flower
50g Buckwheat Flower
100g Tapioca Flour
1tsp Bicarbonate of Soda
2tsp Cream of Tartar
3/4tsp Salt
1/2tbsp Butter
1 Large Egg (Beaten)
300ml Rice Milk

Recipe:

Heat the oven to 180oC/350oF/Gas Mark 4
Mix the flours together in a mixing bowl then mix in the other dry ingredients. Rub in the butter, then stir in the egg and milk, making sure that they are all thoroughly amalgamated.
Grease or oil a 15cm/6inch round cake tin or loaf tin (we use a loaf tin) and pour in the soda bread mixture. Or form into a circle on a greased baking try and cut a cross in the top. Bake in the centre of the oven for 45 - 50 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean.
Allow to cool slightly in the tin, cover with a tea cloth, then knock out carefully onto the rack. Cover with a tea cloth and allow to get completely cold before slicing.

It's really nice Redfox to see a Gluten free recipe that has been modified to not use Potato flour. As you know I'm allergic to potatoes so I'll be trying this as soon as I have free run of the kitchen.
 

Mona

Jedi Master
I have a great recipe that is sooo light and fluffy and tastes heavenly. Unfortunately it contains nuts so for those who are allergic this is not going to work. But here it is. You can add bits of dark chocolate into the final dough before baking, or poppyseed (I hope this is healthy as I grew up on this stuff and I love to eat it even with rice noodles with little of stevia sugar and melted butter).

Coffee/Tea cake

6 eggs (separated)
1 cup ground almonds
half cup fine unsweetened coconut
third cup of buckwheat flour
half teaspoon of baking powder
pinch of salt
stevia sugar (as much as you want)
50 ml grapeseed oil
a litle of rice milk

Sift dry ingredients: flour, baking powder, salt, almonds, then add coconut

Mix egg yolks with sugar for about 5 minutes by hand with a wooden spoon. You can add real vanilla.
Then slowly mix into the yolk mixture flour then oil, flour then oil and rice milk if you feel the dough is too thick.
Finally with an electric mixer beat the egg whites to stifness. Fold the stiff egg whites with a wooden spoon into the dough, do not use an electric mixer to do this. The dough will be light. I use a bund cake form or you can use a rectangular form whatever you prefer. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 25 minutes.
 

Ollie

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
The cold months have proved too cold for either yeast or sourdough bread experimentation in my kitchen. And, previous attempts at Gluten-Free Soda breads led to hard, dense lumps that were inedible.

Recently I discovered a new method of baking bread; a conventional recipe for Bastible Bread. A Bastible is an iron pot that was used as a pot over an open fire. For breads cooked this way the crusts are softer because of the steam trapped inside the pot. An equivalent Soda bread, with a similar soft crust may be cooked in a covered casserole in an oven.

My first attempt was a straight conversion of a ‘wheaten flour’ Bastible Bread.
Ingredients
400g Buckwheat flour
100g Tapioca flour
1tsp salt
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
450ml Buttermilk equivalent (Goats milk or Rice milk plus 2tbsp fresh lemon juice, set aside for 15mins)

Preheat a greased and lined 9.5in (24cm) casserole in the oven at 230C/450F/Gas Mk 8

Mix the flours in a large plastic food bag with the salt and bicarbonate of soda, and thoroughly mix by tossing around the flours in the bag.
Empty flour mix into a large mixing bowl and pour in all the ‘buttermilk equivalent’ and stir. The result was a very sloppy mix, certainly not a dough. So I added more flour, another 100g to get more ‘stiffness’; it was still quite pourable.
The mix was poured into the hot casserole and the lid put on, and baked for 45mins, or until a skewer comes out clean (it was probably cooked a lot earlier).

The result was beautiful, a soft and springy bread, much to my surprise!

Based on this result, I took a smaller quantity, multi-flour Gluten-Free Soda bread recipe to see how that performed, and reduced the number of flours to two. There are two varieties: one with egg, and one without.

Ingredients
1 3/4Cup (255g) Buckwheat flour
1/4Cup (33g) Tapioca flour
1tsp salt
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 1/2tsp cream of tartar
1tbsp butter, or ghee
1 egg lightly beaten – or left out for the egg free version
¾ Cup rice plus 1tbsp (205ml) rice milk or goats milk – or for the egg free version, ¾ Cup plus 2tbsp plus 1tsp (225ml)

You can use less liquid to make a dough that can be ‘shaped’, can cut a deep cross on it and prick the centre of the quadrants ‘to let the fairies out’. However, the sloppier the mix the better it is for Gluten-free flours.

As this Soda bread uses a smaller amount of flour, a 6in (15cm) cake tin was greased and lined with baking paper and place inside greased and lined 9.5in (24cm) casserole. The combination was preheated in the oven at 230C/450F/Gas Mk 8.

The dry ingredients were mixed in a large plastic food bag, and thoroughly mix by tossing around the flours in the bag. The flour mix was emptied into a large mixing bowl.
The lightly beaten egg was then incorporated into the flour mix, followed by the milk.
The mixture was poured into the hot cake tin inside the casserole, the lid put on, and baked for 20mins or until a skewer comes out clean.

Carefully remove the bread from the cake tin, place on a wire cooling rack and cover with a tea towel until cold, and then slice.

Both versions were a delight, soft and springy with an open texture to the bread. The sloppy dough leads to an open, chewy crumb. Also, the Tapioca flour adds a chewy texture to the bread. The use of butter has a small effect on the keeping quality, but increases gas retention.

As with all Gluten-Free breads, they are best eaten on the first day, or sliced and frozen. However, these breads were edible on both a second and third day, although progressively ‘stiffening up’.

Spurred on by the success of this ‘steam-baking’ method, I applied the technique to RedFox’s Gluten-Free bread recipe, with a couple of differences: the Gram and Rice flours became additional Buckwheat flour (a total of 350g); and the baking time was reduced to 20-25mins at 230C/450F/Gas Mk 8 in the ‘Bastible’. Once again, the result was delightful, a soft and springy bread, even though this was a larger bread.
 
G

Gertrudes

Guest
RedFox said:
Have been meaning to post the gluten free bread recipe that my mum makes here for a while now.
Its from a book called "The Everyday Wheat-Free & Gluten-Free Cookbook" by Michelle Berriedale-Johnson
(...)
However with my suggestion we have modified the ingredients to be as follows (hopefully to be 'evil' free):

RedFox:
Yesterday my partner cooked this bread for the first time. I like bread but am generally not its greatest fan, I have to say though that this one was delicious! I have just a few questions in case you are able to help.

My partner has followed the receipt faithfully with the exception of the egg, to which I suspect I am allergic. When it got to the point of putting the final mixture into the baking tray, the result was very humid and didn't have enough consistency to be shaped in any form. We weren't sure whether the mixture was supposed to have that type of consistency, it wasn't liquid enough to pour it into the tray, and it wasn't solid enough to be able to manage it either. My partner decided to add more flour (can't remember which type) for a more solid mixture and carry on from there. Well, the result was great, we both loved the bread. However, perhaps we messed up and added too much flour in the end?
My question is then, do you know which type of consistency we are looking for?

Trevrizent said:
Recently I discovered a new method of baking bread; a conventional recipe for Bastible Bread. A Bastible is an iron pot that was used as a pot over an open fire. For breads cooked this way the crusts are softer because of the steam trapped inside the pot. An equivalent Soda bread, with a similar soft crust may be cooked in a covered casserole in an oven.

Thank you for both the receipts and the pot suggestion Trevrizent! We will definitely try those. If I understood you correctly, a regular oven casserole would do the trick, right?

I haven't found tapioca flour so far, so for Redfox's receipt we have used what we believe to be mandioca or manioc flour instead. The package says cassava flour, would anyone know whether this is indeed mandioca/manioc, and whether tapioca could be found under a different designation?

Thank you in advance :)
 

Ollie

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Gertrudes said:
... We weren't sure whether the mixture was supposed to have that type of consistency, it wasn't liquid enough to pour it into the tray, and it wasn't solid enough to be able to manage it either. My partner decided to add more flour (can't remember which type) for a more solid mixture and carry on from there. Well, the result was great, we both loved the bread. However, perhaps we messed up and added too much flour in the end?
My question is then, do you know which type of consistency we are looking for? ...

The consistency that I find best is '[is]n't liquid enough to pour', needing a spoon to 'encourage' it into the pan. If it is more fluid than this it is OK. Andrew Whitley in Bread Matters writes
Make it wet. Gluten-free flours need much more water than wheat ones. There's no point kneading a gluten-free dough because it won't become any more stretchy and if you make it firm enough to be kneadable it will bake into a brick. Gluten-free doughs and cake mixes must be sloppy - really sloppy.

Gertrudes said:
I haven't found tapioca flour so far, ...

You can get Gluten-free Tapioca starch (which is what you want) from innovative-solutions.org.uk the service is excellent.

Edit: add,
Gertrudes said:
... we have used what we believe to be mandioca or manioc flour instead. The package says cassava flour, would anyone know whether this is indeed mandioca/manioc, and whether tapioca could be found under a different designation?

Tapioca flour is also known as Manioc or cassava.

Gertrudes said:
... If I understood you correctly, a regular oven casserole would do the trick, right?

I use a stainless steel casserole, as the knob on the lid of my cast iron casserole would not stand the temperature - it would melt!
 
G

Gertrudes

Guest
Trevrizent said:
The consistency that I find best is '[is]n't liquid enough to pour', needing a spoon to 'encourage' it into the pan. If it is more fluid than this it is OK. Andrew Whitley in Bread Matters writes
Make it wet. Gluten-free flours need much more water than wheat ones. There's no point kneading a gluten-free dough because it won't become any more stretchy and if you make it firm enough to be kneadable it will bake into a brick. Gluten-free doughs and cake mixes must be sloppy - really sloppy.

Thanks Trevrizent, I did suspect we used too much flour, now I know :rolleyes:

Trevrizent said:
Tapioca flour is also known as Manioc or cassava.

Oh, so we used tapioca flour after all! I have been searching on the net and it seems that mandioca refers to the fruit and tapioca refers to the flour from that same fruit, I'm not too sure about this though. In both cases, they are related to cassava.

Trevrizent said:
I use a stainless steel casserole, as the knob on the lid of my cast iron casserole would not stand the temperature - it would melt!

I will get a proper oven casserole soon. I'm looking forward to trying the baking method you've suggested!
 
G

Gertrudes

Guest
Trevrizent said:
Recently I discovered a new method of baking bread; a conventional recipe for Bastible Bread. A Bastible is an iron pot that was used as a pot over an open fire. For breads cooked this way the crusts are softer because of the steam trapped inside the pot. An equivalent Soda bread, with a similar soft crust may be cooked in a covered casserole in an oven.

My first attempt was a straight conversion of a ‘wheaten flour’ Bastible Bread.
Ingredients
400g Buckwheat flour
100g Tapioca flour
1tsp salt
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
450ml Buttermilk equivalent (Goats milk or Rice milk plus 2tbsp fresh lemon juice, set aside for 15mins)
(...)
The result was beautiful, a soft and springy bread, much to my surprise!

I would just like to report the success we had with our first bread, cooked a few hours ago, taken from the above recipe by Trevrizent. Having cooked it in a casserole gave it the soft springy consistency described by Trevrizent, quite unexpected for a gluten free bread.

Best of all, my partner who eats a lot of bread absolutely loved it. This is great, because it means that we can finally eliminate gluten from our house. He is so impressed that he's trying Redfox's receipt on the casserole as I write this :D
 

annp

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thank you for this recipe - I buy Lara Bars by the dozen just to keep with me while running errands. I find that as long as I have some "emergency food" I am much less likely to succumb to forbidden foods. I have been searching for an alternative that I could make myself and was really happy to see this.

I made a batch of these last night - really tasty, however I needed to cook them a bit longer and I noticed they are very crumbly. I was tired, so could have used too much ghee - not really sure. I could not really cut them into bars - but I had an inspiration. I spooned the mixture into muffin tins (lined with paper cups) and then froze them. I was able to pop one out this morning to bring for a mid-morning treat.
aleana


Trevrizent said:
High energy protein bar
This may be used as a breakfast bar, or for the busy person or hiker, as a mid-morning snack or lunch. Makes 15 or 16 bars. I’ve been experimenting with this recipe for a while to finally arrive at this.

Ingredients:
100g (1 cup) buckwheat flakes
280ml (1 cup + 2 tbsp) red grape juice (I have also used apple juice, and apricot successfully)
115g (1/2 cup) butter or ghee (I have used both)
60g (1/4 cup) Xylitol
2 eggs (or any one of the several egg substitute formulas)
100g (3/4 cup) sunflower seeds, then chopped up
100g (3/4 cup) pumpkin seeds, then chopped up
100g (1 cup) flaked almonds, then chopped up
100g (3/4 cup) dried cranberries (or chopped dried figs, or …)
100g (1/2 cup) dried blueberries (or chopped dried dates, or …)
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp tumeric
1 tsp ginger
 
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