Hemochromatosis and Autoimmune Conditions

Gaby

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An explorative study of non-invasive ultra-weak photon emission and the anti-oxidative influence of oral zinc sulphate in light-sensitive patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria.

_http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22092997

Skin Res Technol. 2012 Nov;18(4):405-12. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0846.2011.00586.x. Epub 2011 Nov 16.

An explorative study of non-invasive ultra-weak photon emission and the anti-oxidative influence of oral zinc sulphate in light-sensitive patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria.

Petersen AB, Philipsen PA, Wulf HC.

Source

Department of Dermatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is a rare, inherited disorder of haem biosynthesis owing to deficient ferrochelatase (FECH) and accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). This results in acute cutaneous photosensitivity upon light exposure with production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) as a by-product. We investigated if UPE evaluated the light sensitivity in EPP patients and influence of zinc treatment.

METHODS:

Fourteen EPP patients took zinc sulphate (3 × 200 mg/day) during spring and summer. Using a photomultiplier (PM), UPE was measured from the buttock skin and dorsal hand before and after solar-simulated light (SUN) exposure. Blood samples were analysed routinely for plasma zinc, iron, ferritin, transferrin, haemoglobin, erythrocyte PPIX and Zn-PPIX.

RESULTS:

UPE in EPP patients resembled that seen in healthy individuals. Without treatment, a seasonal decrease was seen from spring to summer in four control patients. However, oral zinc treatment reduced ROS formation significantly regardless of SUN exposure. After SUN exposure, the initial burst was correlated to plasma iron and erythrocyte PPIX. During treatment, an inverse correlation was found between plasma zinc concentration and the initial burst.

CONCLUSION:

Measurements of UPE can be used for monitoring UVA-induced oxidative processes in vivo in the skin of EPP patients.
Of relevance within the paper:

Besides
its roles in metalloenzymes, zinc functions
as an antioxidant and is a structural component
of membranes
(17). Zinc has the capacity
to replace transition metals (Fe,Cu)
from binding sites, which prevents the local
redox-cycling of the metals, the concomitant
production of ROS and the oxidation of macromolecules
in the vicinity
(18). Therefore, oral
zinc treatment could potentially reduce the
symptoms of light sensitivity by competing
with iron and acting as an antioxidant; and
thereby contribute to minimise ROS production
and phototoxicity.
Attached as a PDF.
 

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ark

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sitting said:
PS At the risk of being intrusive, I like to ask Ark for his view on this topic as well.
I think that the idea of getting rid of some of the old blood and asking the body to produce the brand new replacement is a healthy idea. In fact I will do it soon. New is not always better than old, like a new driver for your video card that sometimes screws up your computer. Yet we take the risks. In this case I am going to replace my blood cells with some of version 1.1 - with more functionality. Well, in this case I am getting rid of some obsolete hardware (iron) :)

I think it's ingrained from Taoist tradition.
Do not forget that leach therapy is also used in traditional Chinese medicine!
 

sitting

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ark said:
In this case I am going to replace my blood cells with some of version 1.1 - with more functionality.
I guess as long as it's not Windows 8, you should be just fine! :)

And thank you for taking the time to answer my question.
 

l apprenti de forgeron

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Update what I wrote before. With the second round of EDTA and the required substances Like Selenium, chromium picoinate,
vitamins, etc. I managed to re-balance the brain chemistry and I have no more panic attacks (I repeat that zinc poisoning was my mistaken by belief that vaccines contained EDTA, when it was not so. so zinc in vaccines then taking pills-with zinc!-. A mess. Maybe I also lacked Magnesium)
I must thank the paleo diet because it my heart could resist so many arrhythmias. I also believe that many episodes of terrible feelings of proximity to death in the last two months can be like breaks of certain false foundations of my ego. Since I believe I belong to that crystallize (as opposed to split) as told by the C's ("If one crystallizes on the wrong foundation it means much more suffering"). So maybe I still need many more suffering to clean all the lies (although I have not really knowledge of which of the two categories belong. Will exist mixtures and degrees in that?).
Well, thanks for reading and sorry for the noise. And thank you Ailén and Psyche for the links!
 

Michal

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Hi,
Update of my ferritin level:

After two "small decantings" and three oral EDTA's rounds (calcium disodium) my ferritin result dropped to 216 ng / ml from 353 in the beginning of May.

I have checked my genes and no mutation for hemochromatosis present.

I have reached limit of red blood cells - 4.31 T/l with norm 4.5-5.7 and reached Hematocrit limit - 36.8 % with norm 40 - 49.5. So now I wait to come back to normal with RBC and Hematocrit.
 

Chu

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Thank you very much for those papers, Psyche. If you find anything else, I'll forward them to this doctor.
 

anart

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anart said:
Okay, here are my results:

Test Description Result Range Units
Iron, Serum001339 105 35-155 ug/dL
Iron Bind.Cap.(TIBC)001347 230 250-450 ug/dL (the lab flagged as low)
UIBC 001348 125 150-375 ug/dL (the lab flagged as low)
Iron Saturation 011362 46 15-55 %

Test Description Result Range Units
Ferritin, Serum 004598 197 13-150 ng/mL (the lab flagged this as high)
Just an update for the data pool - After giving two pints of blood and drinking activated charcoal on average of every few days for the past 2 months (some days I'd drink it some days I would not), my Ferritin level dropped to 55 from 197, so I think the activated charcoal really played a part since giving a pint of blood should only drop it about 50 points from what I understand, so if the drop were just from the pints of blood, the reading should have been around 97. Of course there could be other factors at play of which I am unaware. Serum iron level dropped to 70, though that doesn't tell us much.

Unfortunately, this doctor I had didn't do either of the binding capacity tests so I have no idea of the saturation, logically, it should have improved (I think). So, I'm going to continue to give blood as often as the red cross allows me to and I think that should manage it. All my other blood tests were normal and she did an abdominal ultrasound to make sure I didn't have liver enlargement or anything and that all looked normal as well. I did have one liver hemangioma, a benign mass but she said that's no big deal.

So, if anyone can't do EDTA or doesn't want to do EDTA, activated charcoal certainly appears to be an alternative.
 

Gaby

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anart said:
So, if anyone can't do EDTA or doesn't want to do EDTA, activated charcoal certainly appears to be an alternative.
And a cheaper one :). Thanks for sharing.
 

nicklebleu

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Psyche said:
anart said:
So, if anyone can't do EDTA or doesn't want to do EDTA, activated charcoal certainly appears to be an alternative.
And a cheaper one :). Thanks for sharing.
Interesting thing ... thanks for sharing!

Anart, how did you come up with activated charcoal - I would never have thought about it ...
 

Gawan

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nicklebleu said:
Psyche said:
anart said:
So, if anyone can't do EDTA or doesn't want to do EDTA, activated charcoal certainly appears to be an alternative.
And a cheaper one :). Thanks for sharing.
Interesting thing ... thanks for sharing!

Anart, how did you come up with activated charcoal - I would never have thought about it ...
Thanks for sharing and it is indeed much cheaper and could be easier to take with less side effects. Maybe cause of a water filter ;).
 

Voyageur

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nicklebleu said:
Psyche said:
anart said:
So, if anyone can't do EDTA or doesn't want to do EDTA, activated charcoal certainly appears to be an alternative.
And a cheaper one :). Thanks for sharing.
Interesting thing ... thanks for sharing!

Anart, how did you come up with activated charcoal - I would never have thought about it ...
Very interesting charcoal link anart, thank you for that. Pint # 2 coming up in August and will add this and then retest.
 

SeekinTruth

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I finally got my blood test results. Blood given on July 3, 2013, results received July 6, 2013. Been meaning to post them the last couple of days.

I'll just post the iron and lipid panel here and post the full results in the other thread "Help to understand blood test results" when I get a chance in the next couple of days.


Item Result Reference Ranges
Fe (iron) (Ferrum) 106.4 (male): 65-175 mg/dl
TIBC 307.6 250-400 mg/dl
Transferrin saturation 311.0 200-360 mg/dl
Ferritin 143.0 (male (20-50 years)): 34-310 ng/dl

UIBC wasn't tested but from calculating (subtracting serum iron from TIBC) gives: 201.2 mg/dl and Ref. Range is shown as 190-250 mg/dl. And Transferrin Saturation calculated as a percentage (dividing serum iron by TIBC) gives 34.59%. Hemoglobin was 133 g/l (so 13.3 g/dl) with a Ref. Range shown as male: 135-175 g/l. Hematocrit was 41% (Ref. Range male: 40-52%).

Item Result Reference Ranges
Total Cholesterol 326.1 perfect level 120-220 mg/dl
max. permissible 220-260 mg/dl
dangerous level >260 mg/dl

HDL 38.7 perfect level >55 mg/dl
max. permissible 35-55 mg/dl
dangerous level <35 mg/dl

LDL 271.0 perfect level <150 mg/dl
max. permissible 150-189 mg/dl
dangerous level >190 mg/dl

Triglycerides 82.0 perfect level <150 mg/dl
max. permiss. 150-200 mg/dl
dangerous level >200 mg/dl

Atherogenic factor 7.4 40-60 years 0-3.5
High risk of CHD development >4

So overall, it's not TOO bad, but I'm going to donate blood a couple of times in the next two months or so to get the ferritin down closer to the 60 to 80 ng/dl range. The lipid panel is probably related to the somewhat high ferritin. I'm surprised my HDL is low (and LDL kinda on the high side -- but again that's probably related to ferritin level) and although tryglicerides are pretty good, I thought it would be even better since I've been in permanent nutritional ketosis for two and a half years.

I don't know what to make of the "Atherogenic factor." Looks kinda worrying, but I'm not really sure what it's measuring and how meaningful it is. If anyone has any input, I'd appreciate it. But, again, I'll post the entire blood test results in the other thread, as I get time to give a more comprehensive picture. Just about everything else looks pretty good, except a couple of other items are out of reference range (whatever that's supposed to mean in and of itself -- not much in most cases from what I've figured).

My mother has decanted twice with about 4 weeks in between (about 500 ml each time) so far. She seems to be feeling better lately overall. I've also ordered EDTA, minerals, and activated charcoal and was waiting the last few weeks for the order to arrive and got notified today that it ended up at customs. So I'll be going to retrieve those probably tomorrow. I had ordered a bunch of charcoal with all the rest of the supplements just to have on hand (it's good to have like as part of a first aid/emergency kit for poisoning, etc.) and am glad to hear that it may also help reduce ferritin levels faster. So might experiment with that too.
 

Gandalf

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nicklebleu said:
Psyche said:
anart said:
So, if anyone can't do EDTA or doesn't want to do EDTA, activated charcoal certainly appears to be an alternative.
And a cheaper one :). Thanks for sharing.
Interesting thing ... thanks for sharing!

Anart, how did you come up with activated charcoal - I would never have thought about it ...
Thanks so much for sharing Anart. What a good idea to take activated charcoal. :perfect:
 

nicklebleu

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SeekinTruth said:
Don't know what to make of the "Atherogenic factor." Looks kinda worrying, but I'm not really sure what it's measuring and how meaningful it is. If anyone has any input, I'd appreciate it. But, again, I'll post the entire blood test results in the other thread, as I get time to give a more comprehensive picture. Just about everything else looks pretty good, except a couple of other items are out of reference range (whatever that's supposed to mean in and of itself -- not much in most cases from what I've figured).
I couldn't find much info about this on the net, but my guess is that it is a comparison of relative risks of developing CHD compared to other lipid profiles in the general population. So on the face of it it looks bad.

However things are not as easy as mainstream medicine purports it to be.

I am basically in the same boat as you - my lipid profile actually is even worse.

There are several interpretations and actions that come to mind:

1) Follow the party line: This is bad, you need to start taking statins and get your cholesterol down, stop eating fatty meat ... AND STOP SMOKING!!!!

2) Just ignore everything and hope for the best, because not all high cholesterol leads to CHD - mainstream med doesn't understand when it does and when it doesn't.

3) I am doing a ketogenic diet and have tried to eliminate toxic factors from my environment as much as humanely possible - and I have still high lipids. No-one has tested lipid profile outcomes when eating a ketogenic diet long-term. High cholesterol is probably a measure of inflammation in the body, due to a multitude of possible factors (gluten, sugar, pesticides, allergens, heavy metals, psychological stress, just to name a few) and higher risk for CHD probably just reflects this. Now since I have eliminated most of the inflammatory sources I should be much less likely develop CHD than a comparable person eating a standard western diet and being subject to all the other influences.

4) The last possibility is that I have familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disposition to high blood lipids. There is some data pointing to the possibility that a high-fat diet ketogenic diet can massively increase lipid levels in the blood in FH, contrary to most studies who show that a low carb, high fat diet usually has very little influence, or beneficial influence, on your lipid profile.

My hypothesis at the moment - and research direction - is, that it is an inflammatory process. Consequently it should get better if I reduce inflammation, which I try to do with EDTA. I'll certainly report back here on how this hypothesis is faring ...
 
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