Infrasound- is it a possible source of mind control?

Wow- several of you who replied found some great material on infrasound I had not seen yet- thank you!

As to the recent events regarding the sessions, considering the government could have played this card a looong time ago, I hope the revival of this thread did not contribute to the current plight. I never posted anything after the OP due to lack of responses and assuming it was just noise. But then I remembered from a thread I read here some time ago that sometimes, even if you do know or discover something, you should not necessarily say it or write it- i.e. strategic enclosure. After the C's brought it up in the last session, and knowing the session was public, I didn't see any reason to hold back on the subject anymore.

I feel this may have been a terrible error in judgement. It's one thing to accuse someone (or group) of mind control, but when you show a verifiable means as to how it could be accomplished relative to a current event, it's like opening Pandora's box. I'm sure given the C's candor in the session regarding current events that there are other things as well that could have been the trigger, but I can't help wonder if I should have just left this topic alone. :(

In any case, I have been able to find the files I thought were gone, so after I sort through them I'll start posting some of the papers from journals that detail specific experiments on human physiology. A lot of them have been done since 2008, and mainly by Chinese researchers. I'm trying to find the frequency effect chart that was on a Russian university site which showed all currently known effects from 1hz to 20hz. Unfortunately, the folder had a lot of links saved to these original websites- and many of them are now not working.

At least I didn't lose the .jpg shots of the infrasound measured between 0-5hz in the weeks proceeding and up to 9-11 since the induction magnetometer site at Gakona, AK is now gone. There's almost 5 years of research in that folder, so if anyone is looking for something specific, please ask and I'll see if I have something you are looking for. The most interesting thing I was researching at the end before stopping was the piezoelectric effect of quartz and similar materials and their interactions/effects with infrasound (such as a detector that can sense the P-wave 20-30 seconds before an earthquake actually starts).
 

shijing

The Living Force
This is an article which summarizes some general info on infrasound (some of it repeats what has been mentioned in previous posts). There are additional links to sites which discuss infrasound at the bottom of the article, but the majority of them seem to be defunct right now:

http://www.eastcoastrip.org/did-you-know/infrasound

Infrasound

Infrasound refers to sound vibrations that are at a frequency too low to be heard by the human ear which has a range from 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz (called the audible range). Levels below 20 Hz are described as infrasonic (infrasound) and those above 20,000 Hz are ultrasonic.

While we may experience discomfort at sounds we can hear at volumes of around 80 decibels upwards, it is believed exposure to low frequency sound vibrations which we cannot detect may also have considerable impact on humans. In much the same way many find the audible bass of a high volume car stereo annoying, sounds at even lower frequencies may interfere with our emotions and perceptions. It is known that military forces have examined the effects of infrasound and even looked into its use as a weapon.

Exposure to infrasound has been demonstrated to effect recipients with symptoms including fear, sorrow, depression, anxiety, nausea, chest pressure and hallucination. It can cause objects to move through vibration and some believe the body’s internal organs can be effected. It is suggested that levels above 80 decibels at frequencies between 0.5 to 10Hz may start to effect the vestibular of the inner ear thus causing disorientation. Any high volume sound can trigger the body to react by increasing respiration, heart rate and blood pressure, but when they cannot actually hear the sound recipients are left with no explanation for the sudden onset of these symptoms. This may then lead to further effects caused by the minds possible reaction to the unknown, as outlined below.

Once the mind receives information it considers unusual it may enter into “search mode” to try and explain what is being experienced, calling on all senses to assist - sight, sound, touch, smell etc... The longer the search goes on without an answer, the more intense the scrutiny. In the extreme, the body may react in “survival instinct” - fear sets in, pulse races etc... This is the body’s natural reaction to the unknown, preparing it for possible “fight or flight” from danger. At such times, because the senses are so heightened and “in tune” for experiencing something, the brain may begin to misinterpret what the senses are picking up. Much akin to sitting alone in the dark after watching a horror movie although to a much greater extent.

This is all a natural reaction of the brain and very real to the witness. Possible triggers (either alone or in combination) are anything that may suggest something strange is occurring including high EMF, infrasound, low atmospheric pressure, carbon monoxide exposure, darkness, isolation and any stimulus that may create suggestion such as watching a spooky movie, being in an spooky location, or Ouija board use. Ocean waves are known to sometimes generate infrasound and it has been suggested to have been a possible "trigger" causing ships crews to abandon their craft in fear, only to have the ship later found mysteriously drifting about unmanned.

The range of infrasound is generally accepted to be between 0-20 hertz with a specific area of interest between 17 and 19 hertz. Tests by NASA have revealed that the human eyeball resonates at around 18Hz, to which infrasound exposure may cause a reaction and lead to hallucinations.

Infrasound occurs quite naturally at some locations and possible causes include storms, earthquakes, waterfalls, volcanoes, ocean waves and wind reacting with structures such as chimneys. Some buildings or natural features can act as Helmholtz resonators and create infrasound at high levels. Ancient places of worship or ceremonial burial such as the Maeshowe mound in Orkney, have been shown to act in this way. Some animals are sensitive to these low frequency vibrations and may appear to "foresee" approaching storms and earthquakes. Elephants are known to use infrasound as a form of communication over long distances.

It is possible that any room with an open doorway or window can operate like a Helmhotz resonator, similar to blowing a column of air across an empty bottle. Subsonic sound can travel long distances, pass through walls and may be amplified in tunnel like structures. Standard hearing protection is of little use for subsonic sound as it often can pass straight through and may even be amplified. There have been links reported between supposedly haunted locations and the presence of infrasound, which is the reason paranormal investigators may monitor infrasound levels whenever possible.

The following text gives some insight into how sound levels including infrasound are represented (usually in pascals, micropascals or decibels) which may be of some assistance in interpreting the results of monitoring.

There is a huge variance in sound pressure ranging from the minimum that can be heard by the human ear, 20 micropascals, to the threshold of pain, 20 Pa (pascals). Because of this huge range a logarithmic scale is used to represent the sound pressure level (SPL). A reference of 20 micropascals is commonly used, being the lowest level that can be heard by the human ear at a frequency of 1000 Hz. This is equal to .02 mPa (millipascals) or 0.00002 Pa (pascals). The unknown level is compared to the 20 micropascal threshold which is given a value of 0 dB (decibels) and the resulting level is expressed in decibels (dB). Because the human ear perceives sound intensity differently depending on it’s frequency, weightings may also be applied in attempt to match what the human ear experiences. "A-weighted” levels are the most common used, although a “G-weighting” is perhaps more suitable for infrasound.

For comparison dB levels for some audible sounds are given below.

0-10dB Threshold of human hearing.
10-20dB Normal breathing, rustling leaves.
20-30dB Whispering at about 1.5 metres.
40-50dB Coffee maker, library, quiet office, quiet residential area.
50-60dB Dishwasher, electric shaver, office, rainfall, refrigerator, sewing machine.
60-70dB Air conditioner, alarm clock, background music, normal conversation, television.
70-80dB Coffee grinder, toilet flush, freeway traffic, hair dryer, vacuum cleaner.
80-90dB Blender, doorbell, heavy traffic, hand saw, lawn mower, ringing telephone, whistling kettle.
85dB Lower limit recommended for the wearing of hearing protection.
90-100dB Electric drill, shouted conversation, tractor, truck.
100-110dB Baby crying, boom box, factory machinery, motorcycle, subway train.
110-120dB Ambulance siren, car horn, leaf blower, walkman on high, power saw, shouting in the ear.
120-130dB Auto stereo, rock concert, chain saw, pneumatic drills, stock car races, thunder, power drill.
130-140dB Threshold of pain, air raid siren, jet airplane taking off, jackhammer.
150-160dB Artillery fire at 500 feet, balloon pop, cap gun.
160-170dB Fireworks, handgun, rifle.
170 -180dB Shotgun.
180 - 190dB Rocket launch, volcanic eruption.

The vibration of the sound alters the pressure of the medium it is traveling in - be it air, water or living cells. If the sound level is very high, the entire organism may vibrate. For instance the pressure of artillery with a few metres can exceed 200dB which is enough to cause blood vessels to tear and could even prove fatal. A level of 140dB is enough is to damage nerves of the inner ear which could lead to permanent deafness.

The sound we can hear (20-20,000Hz) gives us fair warning, but what of the sound frequencies we cannot hear? Such high levels of infrasound can easily pass through the skin and cause organs to vibrate which can lead to symptoms commonly associated with high infrasound exposure (see above). As we cannot hear the sound the cause of the symptoms often remains unidentified - but may be just as intense and harmful as any audible sound exceeding 120dB.

Such sound, although inaudible, is still subject to the laws and principles of pressure waves and may be amplified naturally through resonance etc... The Paranormal Calculator contains some formula which allow various calculations concerning sound waves.
 

Mark7

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
QuantumLogic said:
As to the recent events regarding the sessions, considering the government could have played this card a looong time ago, I hope the revival of this thread did not contribute to the current plight. I never posted anything after the OP due to lack of responses and assuming it was just noise. But then I remembered from a thread I read here some time ago that sometimes, even if you do know or discover something, you should not necessarily say it or write it- i.e. strategic enclosure. After the C's brought it up in the last session, and knowing the session was public, I didn't see any reason to hold back on the subject anymore.

I feel this may have been a terrible error in judgement. It's one thing to accuse someone (or group) of mind control, but when you show a verifiable means as to how it could be accomplished relative to a current event, it's like opening Pandora's box. I'm sure given the C's candor in the session regarding current events that there are other things as well that could have been the trigger, but I can't help wonder if I should have just left this topic alone. :(

I understand your concern, and it is good to be careful, I doubt that there was any trigger here though... dunno.

It's interesting stuff though, something that people just aren't aware of and is not propagated in the mainstream. I just started reading this other thread about Rife technology which is sort of in the same general category of alternative science and health:

http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,36358.0.html

Very interesting stuff as well. I have to struggle to understand the theory behind these topics and my physics is more than a bit rusty, but there are a lot of forum members here with advanced degrees and understanding. Thanks for your work and I hope you are able to continue to share.

[edit: for clarity]
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hmm, I like some electronic music, Drum and Bass in particular. I wonder if it would be a good idea to run mainstream music MP3's through a high pass filter at 20 Hz? I do a little audio editing in audacity, for the Sott radio podcasts mostly. I put anything less than 100 Hz at -24 db, and drop everything past 3k or 4k Hz to -24 or -48 db. Also some normalization and compression. I don't know much about the technical side of audio processing, I just follow some suggestions on podcast editing I found.

Some music definitely has a different feel to it, making the body feel unwell, including headaches. I wonder if it's infrasound that is injected into music that makes for those feelings.
 

trendsetter37

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
mkrnhr said:
It seems that in some varieties of electronic music, they use what is called sub-bass, which is a very low frequency that follows the audible bass or kick drums to induce an additive physical sensation.

Interesting. Wait a min. 140 bpm is 2.33333 (---> keeps going forever) bps which would be classified as infrasonic.

3D Student said:
Hmm, I like some electronic music, Drum and Bass in particular. I wonder if it would be a good idea to run mainstream music MP3's through a high pass filter at 20 Hz?
As do I... This actually crossed my mind while posting some of the songs I've listened to recently. And what I noticed or contemplated was whether or not it mattered if the speaker cone itself was vibrating at an infrasonic rate OR if the combination of sounds hitting your eardrums at the infrasonic frequency worked in the same manner.

For example if you were producing this effect intentionally in mainstream music you know that many headphones or car subwoofers are not capable of producing infrasound.

However, I've noticed that some tracks alternate the bass tones from left to right at a frequency that I am certain is below 20hz. So this could be done with bass notes that are around maybe 1000hz but switched from left to right in your speaker system at a rate below 20 cycles a second.

I've counted this before and thought wow insidious... that is if the above mechanism actually works.

I haven't touched audacity in a long while 3D Student but I'm curious if it could monitor the frequency of changes from left to right. If not then even if we tried to filter 'tones' that were below 20hz it still wouldn't catch frequncies that were provoked by directional switches with bass. Geez this is ridiculous and brings an entirely new meaning to frequncy fence.

Apparently they've been using this technology for a while even in movie theaters to induce fear or excitement during the show.

The 'buttkicker' is apparently top of the line and marketed openly. You attach it to your couch or chair and it can mechanically shake you seat at frequencies all the way down to 5 hz. People are paying for this?

With buckets of power and punch, the ButtKicker will not disappoint. The ButtKicker can 'hear' extremely low sounds - down to 5Hz - so you're in for some bass treats. Attach it to your couch or recliner and discover a deep, dramatic level of immersion in movies and music.
 

Mark7

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
3d Student said:
I put anything less than 100 Hz at -24 db, and drop everything past 3k or 4k Hz to -24 or -48 db

Do you mean everything below 3k or 4k? That would be accumulative attenuation? If I understand correctly any infrasound would already be pretty weak with what you are doing now without adding a high-pass filter, lol, but I am not much of an audiophile.

I think it might be interesting to run some popular tune tune tracks through a spectrum analyser to see if any spikes show up in the infrasound range. Then again, any infrasound frequencies may only show up at live concerts, with specialised equipment present.
 

Mark7

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Trendsetter37 said:
The 'buttkicker' is apparently top of the line and marketed openly. You attach it to your couch or chair and it can mechanically shake you seat at frequencies all the way down to 5 hz. People are paying for this?

Buttkicker huh?! How appropriate :O
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
trendsetter37, it sounds like what you're describing is like how binaural beats work. Bouncing two frequencies to get something in between.

Mark said:
3d Student said:
I put anything less than 100 Hz at -24 db, and drop everything past 3k or 4k Hz to -24 or -48 db

Do you mean everything below 3k or 4k? That would be accumulative attenuation? If I understand correctly any infrasound would already be pretty weak with what you are doing now without adding a high-pass filter, lol, but I am not much of an audiophile.

Those numbers I listed were what I do on an equalization pass. I drop everything around 3k Hz. There's a little 3 db "bump" at 2k, which I read is useful for boosting the common human voice range. I've been playing around with taking out that 2k Hz increase and going down with everything above 2k. But here's what it looks like normally:
 

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mkrnhr

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I think what 3D Student means by 3 to 4 kHz is the highest frequencies. Usually they filter very high frequencies from vocal tracks to remove the "sssss" sounds (some VST filters are caller de-essers) but I'm not sure how they work. 140bpm means beat per minute, it's the tempo of song, not necessarily a track frequency. A good example of a 120bpm song is "staying alive" by the Bee Gees, you can count the kick drums (or the way one follows the song with the leg, or the head, depending on personal styles) during 10 or 20 seconds and multiply accordingly (by 6 or 3). The music industry uses the standardized beats per minutes to correspond to the heart beats that occur in excited states like when one is dancing to upbeat music but that's another story.
In traditional mixing, they remove frequencies below ~100Hz for every track so that it doesn't muddy the bass line. In electronic music they add the infrasound signal in addition to the bass to produce those effects in live situations. Filtering with an EQ like that of audacity is okay. You can also test if your speaker reproduce frequencies below 20Hz by playing some youtube videos that produce those signals and see if things vibrate around the house :)
 
What I understand from my studies for my amateur radio license, almost all of the normal range for the human speaking voice is contained in only 3khz of bandwidth. So sharply sloping everything above 3 or 4 khz for the podcasts is exactly right. In amateur radio (also known as HAM radio), almost all HF frequencies are SSB mode limited to 3khz of bandwidth- just enough to allow for the full speaking voice range.

As far as listening to Youtube recordings for infrasound, I'm not sure how effective that would actually be due to the compression of the audio track. Even MP3's suffer greatly from compression loss, which is why if I rip a CD into a computer, I use a lossless form like FLAC or full raw WAV files. Not only that, but most computer's sound cards cannot resolve frequencies below 20hz, along with most speakers and headphones. You would have to get some higher end gear to get below 20hz.

I do think there is some merit to the thought of stereo bass frequencies, especially if slightly offset, colliding with each other to create infrasound frequencies. In that scenario, one could get and effective secondary pitch as low as .1hz- and I have no idea what frequencies that low could possibly do. All of this makes me wonder if Tesla's "Earthquake Machine" that he attached to the building as an experiment was really a mechanical or electromechanical infrasound generator.
 

mkrnhr

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
QuantumLogic said:
I do think there is some merit to the thought of stereo bass frequencies, especially if slightly offset, colliding with each other to create infrasound frequencies. In that scenario, one could get and effective secondary pitch as low as .1hz- and I have no idea what frequencies that low could possibly do. All of this makes me wonder if Tesla's "Earthquake Machine" that he attached to the building as an experiment was really a mechanical or electromechanical infrasound generator.
I think having the same bass signal alternating to the left and to the right (panning) is not a problem, it's just very annoying because we localise more easily the position of a high frequency sound than a low frequency sound and soing that is mostly idiotic IMHO (bass is usually mono). However, if there is a slight difference in the pitch (frequency), that would produce lower and higher frequencies through the beating phenomenon: _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_%28acoustics%29
Suppose you have a signal at 100Hz and another at 110Hz, the interference of these sine waves will produce a funny signal whom envelope is perceived as 110-100=10Hz
Binaural beats on the other hand are the same beating intereference but it is operated by the brain when the signals arriving from the left and from the right have slightly different frequencies.
 
mkrnhr said:
QuantumLogic said:
I do think there is some merit to the thought of stereo bass frequencies, especially if slightly offset, colliding with each other to create infrasound frequencies. In that scenario, one could get and effective secondary pitch as low as .1hz- and I have no idea what frequencies that low could possibly do. All of this makes me wonder if Tesla's "Earthquake Machine" that he attached to the building as an experiment was really a mechanical or electromechanical infrasound generator.
I think having the same bass signal alternating to the left and to the right (panning) is not a problem, it's just very annoying because we localise more easily the position of a high frequency sound than a low frequency sound and soing that is mostly idiotic IMHO (bass is usually mono). However, if there is a slight difference in the pitch (frequency), that would produce lower and higher frequencies through the beating phenomenon: _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_%28acoustics%29
Suppose you have a signal at 100Hz and another at 110Hz, the interference of these sine waves will produce a funny signal whom envelope is perceived as 110-100=10Hz
Binaural beats on the other hand are the same beating intereference but it is operated by the brain when the signals arriving from the left and from the right have slightly different frequencies.

Exactly- and those offset frequencies end up being offset electrical signals transmitted to the brain. Dangerous, but extremely remarkable. There is a book I never bought that seems rather interesting-

The Effects of Low-Frequency Noise and Vibration on People
Edited by Colin H. Hansen, University of Adelaide
published 2007 • ISBN 0906522 45 5 • ix + 416pp

I found it quite some time ago here _http://www.multi-science.co.uk/effects_low-frequency.htm . It actually looks like the book is a compilation of papers authored by many other researchers on the physiological effects of infrasound. In searching through my recovered folder I realize I have a lot more info saved than I thought. :D
 

mkrnhr

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Funny how the brain associates unrelated things. This discussion about infrasound reminds me of an old man who used to tell us kids fantastic stories and legends. He was a neighbour and the school guardian (in that realm, which has changed several times by now, an old man with the keys was sufficient to guard a school, no armed security vigils or electronic systems or anything). Well, among things he said that I can still remember, like when he told us not to stare at the full moon for too long because it was evil, was the story of the destruction of the world, which would occur some day when a man sitting below a tree would hear a low sound coming from the earth for several days. However, according to this story/legend or whatever, other people would not believe him because they couldn't hear it until it is too late. It could be associated to the observed reaction of animals (or some gifted individuals) sensitive to ultrasound right before earthquakes or maybe a lost knowledge about something else.
 
Well, if that story ends up being true, I suppose a large amount of impacts/earthquakes/eruptions within a short period of time could cause a massive infrasound cascade that would do exactly what the old man described. Perhaps the Wave is really a wave ( or multiple waves) of an infrasound frequency. From the article posted on SOTT today and the description of extremely heightened emotional response to ultrasound of adequate levels, it makes me think of what the C's said- hyperkinetic sensate.

What a wild ride :cool2:
 

Mark7

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
3D Student said:
trendsetter37, it sounds like what you're describing is like how binaural beats work. Bouncing two frequencies to get something in between.

Mark said:
3d Student said:
I put anything less than 100 Hz at -24 db, and drop everything past 3k or 4k Hz to -24 or -48 db

Do you mean everything below 3k or 4k? That would be accumulative attenuation? If I understand correctly any infrasound would already be pretty weak with what you are doing now without adding a high-pass filter, lol, but I am not much of an audiophile.

Those numbers I listed were what I do on an equalization pass. I drop everything around 3k Hz. There's a little 3 db "bump" at 2k, which I read is useful for boosting the common human voice range. I've been playing around with taking out that 2k Hz increase and going down with everything above 2k. But here's what it looks like normally:

Thanks for the explanation and for mkrnhr's further elaboration. Very interesting, a lot if this is new to me but I do remember that little 3 db bump can be very useful in a few applications. Good info in the posts here.
 
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