Insurrection in Kazakhstan: Popular Uprising or 'Color Revolution'?

anka

The Living Force
this came up on my timeline this morning. A bioweapons facility in Kazakhstan funded by the US.

I came across an article in Czech which claims the lab was the first building where the Russian troops headed after they landed but citing no source of the information so it's a hearsay at the moment. There was only a link to Popular Science article from 2013 where there is more info about the lab. It's scary enough on its own when you have the US playing with bubonic plague in Kazakhstan. Combined with the fact discussed here a couple of years ago that the US was collecting DNA samples of people from the former Soviet Union republics for undisclosed reason, the picture is not pretty.

Here the Popular Science long article which is quiet informative, yet naturally more of PR and preventive damage control:

Why The U.S. Is Building A High-Tech Bubonic Plague Lab In Kazakhstan

When Kazakhstan's Central Reference Laboratory opens in September 2015, the $102-million project laboratory will serve as a Central Asian way station for a global war on dangerous disease.

By Alex Pasternack/ Motherboard | Published Aug 29, 2013 5:00 PM

In 1992, Dr. Kanatjan Alibekov, a biologist from the Soviet Union, boarded a flight in Almaty, then Kazakhstan’s capital, for New York. When Dr. Alibekov–now known as Ken Alibek–sat down with the CIA, he had a terrifying secret to reveal: that bio weapons program the Soviet Union stopped in the 1980’s hadn’t actually stopped at all. He knew this because he had led Moscow’s efforts to develop weapons-grade anthrax. In fact, he said, by 1989–around the time that Western leaders were urging the USSR to halt its secret bioweapons program, known as Biopreparat–the Soviet program had dwarfed the US’s by many orders of magnitude. (This is disregarding the possibility that the US was also developing some of these weapons in secret, and, like Russia, still is.)

One big problem, he added, was that, like the stockpiles of nuclear weapons left in the dust of the Soviet Union, the materials and the expertise needed to make a bioweapon–anthrax, smallpox, cholera, plague, hemorrhagic fevers, and so on–could still be lying about, for sale to the highest bidder. Of those scientists, Alibek told the Times in 1998, ”We have lost control of them.”

Today, biologists who worked in the former Soviet Union–like those who responded to a case of the plague across the border in Kyrgyzstan this week–are likely to brush Alibek’s fears aside. But they’ll also tell you that the fall of the Soviet Union devastated their profession, leaving some once prominent scientists in places like Almaty scrambling for new work. That sense of desperation, underlined by Alibek’s defection to the US, has helped pump hundreds of millions of dollars into a Pentagon program to secure not just nuclear materials but chemical and biological ones, in a process by which Washington became, in essence, their highest bidder.

This explains the hulking concrete structure I recently visited at a construction site on the outskirts of Almaty. Set behind trees and concrete and barbed-wire, Kazakhstan’s new Central Reference Laboratory will partly replace the aging buildings nearby where the USSR kept some of its finest potential bioweapons–and where scientists study those powerful pathogens today. When it opens in September 2015, the $102-million project laboratory is meant to serve as a Central Asian way station for a global war on dangerous disease. And as a project under that Pentagon program, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the lab will be built, and some of its early operation funded, by American taxpayers.

The far-flung biological threat reduction lab may look like a strange idea at a time of various sequester outbreaks, but officials say it’s an important anti-terror investment, a much-needed upgrade to a facility that has been described as an aging, un-secure relic of the 1950’s, and one that the Defense Dept. fears can’t keep pace in an era of WMD.

It’s also an investment, they add, in a country where scientists are hungry for more international participation and better facilities–and where the U.S. is keen to keep sensitive materials and knowledge in the right hands and brains.

“You cannot erase this knowledge from someone’s mind,” said Lt. Col. Charles Carlton, director of the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency office in Kazakhstan. The threat of scientists going rogue, he said, is “a serious concern.” “We’re doing our best to employ these people. Our hope is that through gainful employment they won’t be drawn down other avenues.”

There is no hard evidence that bioweapons were pilfered and sold during the 1990s, but Alibek has said that “there are many non-official stocks of smallpox virus,” a virus that was officially eradicated in 1980. Western intelligence agencies also estimate that North Korea and Russia currently have the capacity to deploy smallpox as a weapon of mass destruction. (It’s worth remembering however that fears in the run-up to the Iraq war about Saddam Hussein getting smallpox from Soviet scientists were unfounded, despite widely publicized reports by Judy Miller and others.) Other countries suspected of having inadvertently or deliberately retained specimens of the virus include China, Cuba, India, Iran, Israel and Pakistan.

Bakyt B. Atshabar, head of the 60-year-old institute that will run the new lab, the Kazakh Scientific Center of Quarantine and Zoonotic Diseases, is keenly aware of the dangers of weapons development: his father helped diagnose the effects of weapons tests on thousands of people who lived near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, in the north of the country.

But to him and other biologists in Almaty, the lab is less about defense strategy and more about developing scientific expertise. Currently the KSCQZD is focused on studying and preventing potentially lethal contagion, like the case of the teenager across the southern border in Kyrgyzstan, who died last week from bubonic plague after eating a barbecued marmot (he was likely bitten by a flea, doctors said).

Dr. Bakyt B. Atshabar, head of the institute that will manage the Central Reference Lab​


“We’re looking forward to this becoming a regional training facility focused both on human and animal infections,” he said. “Cholera is also one of the major problems in our region, mostly with our numerous southern neighbors.” He also cited an incident in July in which Kazakh tourists returned from a trip in Southeast Asia with dengue fever.

Increased trade with its eastern neighbor China also threatens to increase the transmission of disease. “Along with the construction of pipelines,” he said, “come rodents and fleas.”

Meanwhile, the country’s meager opposition has called the lab a risk to the citizens of Almaty; the city sits in an active seismic zone, and the lab lies just outside town, and not far from a populated suburban neighborhood. Officials have countered that the building is designed to meet the city’s highest seismic standards, and will replace what a 2011 US embassy statement said were “older buildings at the institute that are not built to withstand such tremors.”

“I would say this could take just about anything,” Dan Erbach, an engineer from AECOM, the contractor overseeing the project, said during a tour of the site, which is currently a set of bulking concrete stacked three and four stories high, set atop a remediated field. “There’s more than twice as much strength in this building than any other building in the city.” (The building’s seismic standard was the result of an intervention by the government, which placed new requirements on the project before construction began in 2011. That pushed the initial completion date back a year to September 2015.)

From a security and safety perspective, the new lab represents a giant leap. When documentarian Simon Reeve visited the existing facility in 2006, he saw Soviet-era buildings and security measures not likely to intimidate a determined terrorist–or a scientist–from sneaking some anthrax or plague out into the wild. Small locks on fridges were all that kept deadly vials from a fast escape.




“We’re not that far from places where terrorists groups are living relatively openly,” Reeve said. “They would love to break in here, they would love to get hold of this stuff.”

Breaches of security and competance have been a problem at U.S. biodefense labs for decades. Texas is a particular hotspot. In 2002, a renowned professor at Texas Tech was alleged to have lied about thirty vials of plague that went missing at his lab. In two separate incidents at Texas A&M in 2006, university officials failed to tell the Center for Disease Control after biodefense researchers were infected with brucella and Q fever, which has been researched as a weapon. In March, when a sample of Guanarito, a Venezualan virus, went missing at the Gavalston National Laboratory, officials cautiously blamed the apparently missing amount on a clerical error, but the incident is under investigation by the FBI.

The Almaty lab will be outfitted with safety features like double-door access zones and special containment hoods, enough to qualify it under U.S. Centers for Disease Control standards as a level 3 biosafety lab, or BSL-3 (the highest level is BSL-4). Only a fraction of the lab will be dedicated to lethal diseases and certified at BSL-3; most of the other labs at the 87,000 square foot building will be BSL-2, for the non-lethal variety.

But plague is already a focus of work at the existing lab in Almaty because it occurs naturally in nearly 40 percent of the country. (The KSCQZD began life in 1949 as the Central Asian Anti-Plague Scientific Research Institute.) Though it’s often spread by fleas, depending on lung infections or sanitary conditions, it also can be spread in the air, through direct contact, or by contaminated undercooked food. Until June 2007, plague was one of the three epidemic diseases required to be reported to the World Health Organization, along with cholera and yellow fever. The case in Kyrgyzstan last week underscored the regional danger of its spread among humans; there are about 3,000 cases per year.

“We will evaluate the scale of contacts, likely natural carriers of the disease, such as rivers,” Zhandarbek Bekshin, an official at Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Health, said. No border crossings have been closed, local media reported, but over one hundred people who came into contact with the teenager were hospitalized.

Climate change is also a concern at the lab. Because climate effects how plague spreads, studying the disease “can also be used as an indicator of changes to the natural environment,” Dr. Atshabar said.

For the US, however, the project is rooted in global security, and fits with its now decades-long collaboration with Kazakhstan in controlling weapons of mass destruction. In 1991 President Nazerbayev oversaw the dismantling and return to Russia of its nuclear weapons. But the country still maintains a store of pathogens that were once cherished by the Soviet military.

The secret Biopreparat program came into sharp focus in 2001, when a former Soviet official explained to a Moscow newspaper the suspected basis of an outbreak of smallpox that sickened ten people and killed three in a community on the Aral Sea: they were the accidental victims of a Soviet military field test at a bioweapons facility based on a nearby island, he said.

Because some of those sickened had already been vaccinated against smallpox, the incident raised questions about the ability of vaccines to protect against state-designed bioweapons.

Lt. Col. Charles Carlton, who heads the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s efforts in Kazakhstan, outside the CRL

With another smaller lab at a military base in the town of Otar, in western Kazakhstan on the Caspian Sea, and a flurry of similar projects in the works–in Russia, Uzbekistan, Georgia, Ukraine, Armenia, and Azerbaijan–the Pentagon hopes its Defense Threat Reduction Agency can also establish a regional early warning system for infections and outbreaks. (As the U.S. weighed responses to Syria’s use of chemical weapons this week, DTRA announced more grants for research into sensing and tracking WMD.)

Is it possible, as some Russian critics have alleged, that labs like this could serve as brain trusts and storehouses for weapons research, for either the US or their home countries? “Russia sees this as… a powerful offensive potential,” Gennady Onishchenko, the Chief Sanitary Inspector of Russia–a kind of Surgeon General–told reporters in July.

Washington denies that these reference labs and the secret research at the historic home of American bioweapons, at the US Army base at Fort Detrick, Maryland, have anything to do with offensive weapons, that they meet the standards of the 1972 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), and that their work will eventually be made public.

Funding for the $103 million construction project in Kazakhstan, and much of the lab’s operations in its early years, will come from the Dept. of Defense, which envisions it as playing a central role in monitoring pathogen outbreaks, a strategy that received new funding after the anthrax attacks in 2001. Last year, the White House announced a program that consolidated these efforts under the banner of “biosurveillance.”

“DOD’s involvement in biosurveillance goes back probably before DOD to the Revolutionary War,” Andrew C. Weber, assistant secretary of defense for nuclear, chemical and biological defense programs, told American Forces Press Service last year. “We didn’t call it biosurveillance then, but monitoring and understanding infectious disease has always been our priority, because for much of our history, we’ve been a global force.”

Global outbreak of infectious disease (International Livestock Research Institute)

As the former director of the two-decade old Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (or “Nunn-Lugar” for short), Weber has paid special attention to Central Asia. After he spent much of the 1990s helping the U.S. remove weapons-grade uranium from the former Soviet Union under Nunn-Lugar, he was instrumental in creating Central Reference Laboratories in Almaty and elsewhere in the region.

An English-language editorial in Pravda in July referenced Weber’s role as something that should “promp[t] serious reflection.” Responding to a US State Department report that Russia was possibly pursuing bioweapons research, the Foreign Ministry in Moscow noted that it “gives impression that the US, despite the changes occurring in the world, still remains in the grip of cold war propaganda.”

Kazakh officials meanwhile underscored that the lab, which operates under Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Health, was not connected to Soviet defense research. But historically, scientists at the USSR’s anti-plague institutes–including the one that will run the new Almaty lab–were also involved in a secret project to design vaccines for pathogens that had been modified by the military program that Dr. Alibek, the defector, once ran.

On the sunny day earlier this month when we visited the site, however, the conversation was focused on saving lives through cooperation, not the opposite. The hope is that labs like this will simply encourage more international scientific relationships, the kind that build cultural trust, and the kind upon which science thrives.

Despite “typical intergovernmental issues,” Carlton and other officials expressed optimism about the collaboration. “I never like to refer to this as the former Soviet Union. That was in the past. In the military, it’s been a sea change in our mentality.

“Kazakhstan has come so far in terms of government organization, and understanding the threat and the problem,” he added. “This is a country that willingly said, we want to get rid of this threat and take the lead. Kazakhstan has opened up as an exemplar around the world.”


This story was reported as part of an International Reporting Project fellowship. It was republished with permission from Motherboard. Follow Alex Pasternack on Twitter
 

Ocean

The Living Force

Who “lost” Kazakhstan and to whom?​



Dear friends, Christ is born! Glorify Him!

The magnitude of the crisis in Kazakhstan has surprised many, including myself. Some compared what happened to the Euromaidan in Kiev, but that is a very bad comparison, if only because the Euromaidan happened on one square of one city whereas the violent insurrection (because that it was it was!) in Kazakhstan began in the western regions but quickly spread to the entire country (which is huge). Just by the sheer magnitude of the insurrection (about 20’000 well organized and trained combatants all over the country) and its extreme violence (cops had their heads cut off!), it was pretty obvious that this was not something spontaneous, but something carefully prepared, organized and then executed. The way the insurgents immediately attacked all TV stations and airports, while bigger mobs were trashing the streets and looting stores, shows a degree of sophistication Ed Luttwak would have approved of!

To me, this is much more similar to what happened in Syria in the cities of Daraa, Homs, Hama, Aleppo, Damascus, and many more.

I will admit that my initial reaction also was “wow, how could the Kazakh and Russian intelligence services miss all the indicators and warnings that such a huge insurrection was carefully prepared and about to explode?”. Then came the news that President Tokaev appealed to The Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), which up until now was a rather flaccid organization and that very same evening Russia began an air bridge to move forces to Kazakhstan, including the subunits of the 45th Guards Separate Special Forces Brigade, 98th Guards Airborne Division and 31st Guards Airborne Assault Brigade. Russian military transporters also airlifted small contingents of Armenian, Kyrgyz, Tadjik special forces. Most interestingly, the Belarusians also sent one reinforced company from their elite 103rd Separate Guards Airborne Brigade (that is the famous Vitebsk Airborne Division, one of the best Soviet Airborne Divisions). Considering the current tensions with the West over the Ukraine, the speed with which these forces were sent to Kazakhstan indicated to me that this was clearly a prepared move.

In other words, at least the Russians had advanced warning and were fully prepared. If so, I doubt they said anything to their colleagues from the CSTO, with the possible (likely?) exception of the Belarusians.

Okay, so let’s explore the implications of the above.

If the Russians knew, why did they do nothing at all to prevent what just happened?

Here we first need to revisit what recently happened in Belarus.

President Lukashenko had pretty much the same foreign policy as President Tokaev: something they call a “multi-vector” foreign policy which I would summarize as follows: pump all the aid and money from Russia, while suppressing pro-Russian forces inside your own country and try to show the AngloZionist Empire that we can be bought, just for the right price of course (this is also what Vucic is doing in Serbia right now). Now let’s recall what happened in Belarus.

The Empire and its vassal states in the EU tried to overthrow Lukashenko who had no other choice than to turn to Russia for help and survival. Russia, of course, did oblige, but only in exchange for Lukashenko’s “good behavior” and comprehensive abandonment of his “multi-vector” foreign policy. Lukashenko prevailed, the opposition was crushed, and Russia and Belarus have already taken major further steps towards their integration.

Now I know that there are those out there who love to accuse Putin (personally) that he “showed weakness”, “let the US and NATO blow up countries on the Russian periphery”, etc. etc. etc. To those inclined to this, I ask a simple question: compare the Belarus before the insurrection and after. Specifically, from the Russian point of view, was the multi-vectoring Belarus preferable to the fully aligned Belarus of today or not? The answer, I submit, is absolutely obvious.

Now let’s look at Kazakhstan. Potentially, this is a much more dangerous country for Russia than Belarus: it has a huge border (7’600km, open and undefended as Kazakhstan is a member of the Eurasian Economic Community!), a strong pan-Turkic underground (supported by Turkey), an equally strong Takfiri underground (supported by various non-state and even state actors in the region), ethnic tensions between the Kazakhs and the Russian minority and very important security ties to Russia. To have the Empire take over Belarus would have been very bad indeed, but the Empire taking over Kazakhstan would have been even much worse.

Yet, as a direct (and, I submit, predictable) consequence of the insurrection, Tokaev now knows that his fate depends on Russia, just like Lukashenko’s. Is that a bad or a good outcome for the Kremlin?

I will toss in another name here: Armenia’s Pashinian, who was a notorious russophobe until the Azeris attacked at which point he had no other choice but to turn to Russia for help and, frankly, survival. That is also true of Erdogan, but he is an ungrateful SOB who can’t ever be trusted, not even for minor matters.

Now remember all those dummies who were screaming urbi et orbi that the CSTO is useless, that the Russians just let the Azeris beat the crap of Armenia and could do nothing about it? As soon as Russia got involved, the war stopped and the “invincible” Bayraktars stopped flying. Is that a good or bad outcome for Russia?

And now, oh sweet irony, the self-same Pashinian happens to be the formal head of the CSTO (more like Stoltenberg really, a official mouthpiece with no real authority) and he had to “order” (announce, really) the CSTO operation into Kazakhstan.

So we have Lukashenko, Pashinian and now Tokaev all ex-multi-vector politicians begging Russia for help and getting that help, but at the obvious political price of ditching their former multi-vector policies.

I don’t know about you, but for me this is a triumph for Russia: without any military intervention or “invasion” (what the TV watching infantiles in the West scare themselves with at night), Putin “cracked” three notorious multi-vectorist and got them to be nice, loyal and very grateful (!) partners for Russia. By the way, Russia also has a very deep “penetration” into all the other “stans” whose leaders are not stupid and who, unlike the western journos and “experts” all read the writing on the wall. The impact of what just took place in Kazakhstan will reverberate all over Central Asia.

About the CSTO operation itself. First, the Russian and Belarusian forces (about 3’000 Russians and 500 Belarusians): they are truly elite, top of the line, battle hardened, professional, highly trained and superbly equipped forces (the other smaller contingents are more for “PR decoration” than for anything else). Officially, their mission is only to protect key official (Kazakh and Russian) facilities but these forces would be more than enough to make minced meat of out any western or Turkish trained Takfiris or nationalists, even if their numbers are much higher than the 20’000 estimate. And, in the worst case, these forces happen to be in control of key airports were Russians (and Belarusians) could send in even more forces, including at least two Russian airborne divisions. That would be a force nothing in Central Asia can even dream of taking on. I should also mention that Russia has a large and strategically crucial military base in Tadjikistan which has trained to fight against Takfiri terrorists and insurgents for decades now and which could also support any Russian military operation in Central Asia.


So the objective of these forces are:

  • To free up Kazakh security and military forces to put down the uprising (which they are doing)
  • To send a political message to the Kazakh security forces: we got your back, no worries, do your job.
  • To send a political message to the insurgents: you will either lay down arms, flee abroad or die (which is what Putin ordered in both Chechnia and Syria, so these are not empty threats at all).
  • To send a political message to the US and Turkey: Tokaev is our guy now, you lost him and this country!
  • To send a political message to the entire Central Asia and Caucasus: if Russia has your back, you will stay in power even if the idiots at CIA/NED/etc. try to color-revolutionize you.
  • To send yet another message to folks like Erdogan or Vucic – all that multi-vectorness will end up very badly for you, use your head before it is too late (for you, not for us – we are fine either way!).
Some have suggested that the timing of the insurrection Kazakhstan was some kind of attempt by US/NATO to “hurt” Russia in her “weak underbelly” and to show Russia that she has to back down from her ultimatum to the West (negotiations are supposed to start tomorrow, in an atmosphere of general pessimism). Well, I don’t have any info out of Langley or Mons, but if that was the US plan, then this entire project not only collapsed, but has backfired very very badly indeed.

Remember, the PSYOP narrative was that Putin is either stupid, or weak or sold out to the West, yet when we look at the “before and after” thingie, we see that while the West “almost” (or so they think) “got” Belarus, Armenia, Azerbaijan and, now, Kazakhstan, the reality is that in each case it appears that the narcissistic megalomaniacs running the West have confidently waltzed into a carefully laid Russian trap which, far from giving the Empire the control of the countries it “almost” acquired, made them lose them for the foreseeable future.

Can you imagine the level of impotent rage and frustration in Langley and Mons when the watch that kind of footage: oy veh!!


Of sure, the AngloZionist propaganda machine and the clueless trolls (paid or not) who parrot that nonsense won’t say a word about all this, but just use your own common sense, use the “before and after” thing, and reach your own conc
Joint briefing by the commander of the collective peacekeeping forces of the CSTO in the Republic of Kazakhstan, Colonel General Andrei Serdyukov, Commander of the Russian Airborne Forces, and Deputy Minister of Defense of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Lieutenant General Sultan Gamaletdinov.

Lieutenant General Sultan Gamaletdinov.

Speaking of conclusions: how about all those who bitched about the CSTO being a toothless wannabe copy of NATO which can get nothing done? You still find it so toothless now?

How does it compare to NATO, no, not on paper, but in terms of combat operations capability?

The West wanted to turn Kazakhstan into a “Russian Afghanistan” (same plan for the Ukraine, by the way). Turkey wanted to turn Kazakhstan into a Turkish-run vassal state. The Takfiris wanted to turn Kazakhstan into some kind of Emirate.

In your opinion, how do you evaluate the effectiveness of a collective security treaty which could foil all of these plans with only a brigade-sized force and in just a few days?

One more thing: there is something else which Kazakhstan and Syria have in common: there were A LOT of CIA/MI6/Mossad/etc agents around Assad, this became quite clear by the number of high-level Syrian officials who either backed the insurrection, or even led it. Most later fled to the West, some were killed. But the point is that the “apple” of the powers structure in Syria was quite rotten. The same can be said for Kazakhstan where a huge purge is taking place, with the highly influential head of the security services (and former Prime Minister!) not only demoted, but arrested for treason!

So in plain English, the SVR/FSB/GRU will now have a free hand to “clean house” the same way the Russians “cleaned house” around Lukashenko and Assad (in this case with Iranian help): quietly and very effectively,

Again, I can hear the hysterical and desperate wailing out of Langley and Mons. That’s what you get for believing your own stupid propaganda!

As for those who bought that silly “Putin losing countries all over the former Soviet Union space” PSYOP narrative, they probably feel quite stupid right now, but won’t ever admit it. Speaking of stupid,

No, Putin is NOT, repeat, NOT trying to “re-create” the Soviet Union.

And while that mediocre non-entity Blinken warns about how the Russians are “hard to get out once they come in” (coming from a US Secretary of State this is both quite hilarious and a new, even higher, level of absolute hypocrisy!), the truth is that most CSTO forces will leave pretty soon, if only because there will be no need to keep them in Kazakhstan. Why? Simple: the hardcore trained terrorists and insurgents will soon be dead, the looting rioters will get off the streets and hope that they don’t get a visit from the Kazakh NSC (National Security Committee) or cops, the traitors in power will either leave the country for the EU or be jailed and the Kazakh security and military forces will regain control of the country and maintain law and order.

Why would the Russian paratroopers and special forces need to stay?

Furthermore, Russia has no need, or desire, to invade or, even less so, administer poor, mostly dysfunctional countries, with major social problems and very little actual benefits to offer Russia. And now that Lukashenko, Pashinian, and Tokaev know that they serve at the pleasure of the Kremlin, you can rest assured that they will generally “behave”. Oh sure, they will remain mostly corrupt states, with nepotism, tribal affiliation, and religious extremism all brewing at some level, but as long as they represent no threat to a) the Russian minority in these states and 2) to Russian national security interests, the Kremlin will not micro-manage them. But at the first sign of a resurgence of “multi-vectoriality” (possibly inspired by the many western corporations working in Kazakhstan) the chairs upon which these leaders currently sit will immediately begin shaking pretty badly and they will know whom to call to stop this.

Speaking of weak “idiots” who “lost” countries to the Empire, does anybody care to make a list of countries the Empire has ACTUALLY snatched away from Russia (or any other adversary) and succeeded in keeping? Syria? Libya? Afghanistan? Iraq maybe? Yemen? And that is after the “Mission Accomplished” declaration by a “triumphant” US President :-)

Okay, the three Baltic statelets. Bravo! Captain America won another Grenada!

Ah, I can hear the voices chanting “the Ukraine! What about the Ukraine!?”. Well, what about the Ukraine?

There is a Russian saying (цыплят по осени считают) which can be roughly translated as “do not count your chickens before they are hatched“. Right now, NOBODY can confidently
Lieutenant General Sultan Gamaletdinov.
Speaking of conclusions: how about all those who bitched about the CSTO being a toothless wannabe copy of NATO which can get nothing done? You still find it so toothless now?

How does it compare to NATO, no, not on paper, but in terms of combat operations capability?

The West wanted to turn Kazakhstan into a “Russian Afghanistan” (same plan for the Ukraine, by the way). Turkey wanted to turn Kazakhstan into a Turkish-run vassal state. The Takfiris wanted to turn Kazakhstan into some kind of Emirate.

In your opinion, how do you evaluate the effectiveness of a collective security treaty which could foil all of these plans with only a brigade-sized force and in just a few days?

One more thing: there is something else which Kazakhstan and Syria have in common: there were A LOT of CIA/MI6/Mossad/etc agents around Assad, this became quite clear by the number of high-level Syrian officials who either backed the insurrection, or even led it. Most later fled to the West, some were killed. But the point is that the “apple” of the powers structure in Syria was quite rotten. The same can be said for Kazakhstan where a huge purge is taking place, with the highly influential head of the security services (and former Prime Minister!) not only demoted, but arrested for treason!

So in plain English, the SVR/FSB/GRU will now have a free hand to “clean house” the same way the Russians “cleaned house” around Lukashenko and Assad (in this case with Iranian help): quietly and very effectively,

Again, I can hear the hysterical and desperate wailing out of Langley and Mons. That’s what you get for believing your own stupid propaganda!

As for those who bought that silly “Putin losing countries all over the former Soviet Union space” PSYOP narrative, they probably feel quite stupid right now, but won’t ever admit it. Speaking of stupid,

No, Putin is NOT, repeat, NOT trying to “re-create” the Soviet Union.

And while that mediocre non-entity Blinken warns about how the Russians are “hard to get out once they come in” (coming from a US Secretary of State this is both quite hilarious and a new, even higher, level of absolute hypocrisy!), the truth is that most CSTO forces will leave pretty soon, if only because there will be no need to keep them in Kazakhstan. Why? Simple: the hardcore trained terrorists and insurgents will soon be dead, the looting rioters will get off the streets and hope that they don’t get a visit from the Kazakh NSC (National Security Committee) or cops, the traitors in power will either leave the country for the EU or be jailed and the Kazakh security and military forces will regain control of the country and maintain law and order.

Why would the Russian paratroopers and special forces need to stay?

Furthermore, Russia has no need, or desire, to invade or, even less so, administer poor, mostly dysfunctional countries, with major social problems and very little actual benefits to offer Russia. And now that Lukashenko, Pashinian, and Tokaev know that they serve at the pleasure of the Kremlin, you can rest assured that they will generally “behave”. Oh sure, they will remain mostly corrupt states, with nepotism, tribal affiliation, and religious extremism all brewing at some level, but as long as they represent no threat to a) the Russian minority in these states and 2) to Russian national security interests, the Kremlin will not micro-manage them. But at the first sign of a resurgence of “multi-vectoriality” (possibly inspired by the many western corporations working in Kazakhstan) the chairs upon which these leaders currently sit will immediately begin shaking pretty badly and they will know whom to call to stop this.

Speaking of weak “idiots” who “lost” countries to the Empire, does anybody care to make a list of countries the Empire has ACTUALLY snatched away from Russia (or any other adversary) and succeeded in keeping? Syria? Libya? Afghanistan? Iraq maybe? Yemen? And that is after the “Mission Accomplished” declaration by a “triumphant” US President :-)

Okay, the three Baltic statelets. Bravo! Captain America won another Grenada!

Ah, I can hear the voices chanting “the Ukraine! What about the Ukraine!?”. Well, what about the Ukraine?

There is a Russian saying (цыплят по осени считают) which can be roughly translated as “do not count your chickens before they are hatched“.

Read the full article here :
 

Zzartemis

Dagobah Resident
SNIP:
The European Union said it was mobilising “all its resources” to help Ukraine, and NATO and the Western allies have warned they will impose “massive consequences” on Russia if it attacks.
 

Ryan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
From the article:

Militants attempting to seize power in Kazakhstan have made at least one attempt to attack a mysterious American biolab. It is known that the terrorists were prevented, but according to both Russian and local media, there were American scientists and probably mercenaries on the territory of the biolab. To date, it is known that equipment and some materials were lost from the laboratory, as well as the American scientists and specialists themselves, who were evacuated to an unknown destination under currently unclear circumstances.

According to Russian journalist Alexander Kotz, the attack on the biolab did take place, however. due to the multi-level protection of the complex of buildings, the militants were not able to enter the territory of the complex. However, it is claimed that after the attempted attack, all employees were evacuated from the secret laboratory, where, among other things, combat viruses are developed (evacuation was carried out in RCBZ suits, – Ed.), as well as equipment and, apparently, some material.

Earlier it became known that the Russian military was denied protection of this important object, despite the fact that the Russian side insisted on it.
Also:
Ex-employee of the SBU of Ukraine spoke about American biological laboratories in the CIS

13.1.22

"Vasyl Prozorov, an ex-employee of the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU), told at a special conference what danger they carry.

The topic of construction in Kazakhstan of another American military biological laboratory, which should soon appear in the village of Gvardeisky, Zhambyl region, seriously stirred up the public of the entire post-Soviet space.

Kazakhstan is not the only country in the CIS that has faced such a problem. The Americans began to create a network of such objects of special suspicion on the territory of the former USSR from Ukraine.

The ex-employee of the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) Vasily Prozorov spoke at a special conference about the danger they pose.

According to him, in 2005 the US Democratic Senator Barack Obama came to Ukraine on an official visit. During his stay in Nezalezhnaya, he was actively interested in the condition of the objects in which the results of biological research by Soviet scientists were stored.

In the same year, an agreement was signed between the US Department of Defense and the Ministry of Health of Ukraine "On cooperation in the field of preventing the spread of technologies, pathogens and knowledge that can be used to develop biological weapons." The American side in this interaction was represented by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which is accountable to the Pentagon.

“The American military then thoroughly registered on the territory of Ukraine,” said Vasily Prozorov at an international conference held in Bishkek on issues of biological security of the CIS space. “Under the pretext of modernizing biological laboratories, they penetrated such institutions as the Ministry of Health, the Republican Sanitary and Epidemiological Service, and the National Academy of Agrarian Sciences. And since 2007, we have actually begun to create a central reference laboratory and storage of especially dangerous pathogens.”

A former lieutenant colonel of the SBU said that in 2013, a collection of pathogens, located in Ukraine and estimated at $ 2 billion , very quickly fell into the hands of the Americans. After that, their specialists introduced an electronic system for monitoring epidemiological diseases in the country. All the information they collected was kept and to this day is kept in strict confidence.

Even the Ukrainian authorities have no access to it...
"
 

dredger

The Living Force
Here's a small article from a usually reliable french source specialized on military subjects, they seem to have reliable sources. I rather trust this source. They post a recent article, it mentions that Russia targeted (and probably captured) the warfare laboratories.



During the crisis in Kazakhstan, considered by some observers as an insurgency and/or coup attempt, and by others as a hybrid attack, Russia's intervention at the head of the Collective Security Treaty Organisation (CSTO) targeted not so much the networks of former President Nursultan Nezarbayev as the former secret Soviet biological warfare laboratories whose conversion is funded by the US Pentagon in this large, landlocked, wealthy Central Asian country.

This important information, which we accidentally received, remains completely unknown to the official media.

Since the beginning of the crisis, unconfirmed reports on "oriented" social media accounts have mentioned the seizure or capture by unknown persons of a biological weapons research laboratory near Almaty. According to other versions, it was a laboratory of the national scientific centre for highly contagious diseases. This was the site first taken by units of the Russian 93rd Airborne Division. Another reference laboratory for biological vectors was also the target of an assault by CBRN (Chemical, Bacteriological, Radiological and Nuclear) units.

The other four sites targeted were the Stepnogorsk Experimental and Production Base, the Gvardeyski Scientific Institute for Agricultural Research, and the Almaty Institute for Plague Research. Test sites such as Vozrozhdenya Island in the Aral Sea were not affected by the CSTO's military operations. These sites were all part of Biopreparat during the Soviet era before being either abandoned or dismantled after the dissolution of the former USSR in 1991-1992. In 1993, Kazakhstan founded the National Biotechnology Centre and experts from the US Department of Defense began to evaluate Kazakh sites from 1995 onwards with a view to converting the former military programme to civilian use. In December 2004, Kazakhstan and the United States signed an agreement to reduce the risk of proliferation of biological weapons, especially pathogens that could be used in an assymetric biological attack. Within this framework, the US government has financed several laboratories, including the National Reference Laboratory for an official amount of USD 103 million, as well as another site in the village of Otar, Jambol region (Jambylskaya), designed to prevent and detect the emergence of new epidemic diseases in the entire region. In total, Washington is allocating more than USD 400 million to this programme, which Moscow viewed with suspicion in 2009-2010. More recently, in the Sino-US indictment of the origin of COVID, accounts affiliated with the government of the People's Republic of China suggested that US activities in Kazakhstan would include the development of new variants of known or widely spread viruses and even the propagation of localised epidemics in certain regions of the world on an experimental basis. This was seen by Washington as a mixture of propaganda and conspiracy.

In hindsight, it seems that the Russians paid close attention to these assumptions. The biological laboratories were the main target of the Russian forces' intervention alongside strategic infrastructure and some voices in Moscow are calling for this unprecedented opportunity to end the US military's activities in Central Asia in general and Kazakhstan in particular.

This is a little-known aspect of a hybrid war that is likely to last.
 

AzarHyun

Jedi
It is worth reading what he has to say on this topic, always well-informed Pepe Eskobar!


Escobar: After Kazakhstan, The Color Revolution Era Is Over


What happened in Kazakhstan increasingly looks like a US-Turkish-British-Israeli-led coup d'etat attempt foiled dramatically by their Eurasian adversaries...

The year 2022 started with Kazakhstan on fire, a serious attack against one of the key hubs of Eurasian integration. We are only beginning to understand what and how it happened.

On Monday morning, leaders of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) held an extraordinary session to discuss Kazakhstan.

Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev framed it succinctly. Riots were “hidden behind unplanned protests.” The goal was “to seize power” – a coup attempt. Actions were “coordinated from a single center.” And “foreign militants were involved in the riots.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin went further: during the riots, “Maidan technologies were used,” a reference to the Ukranian square where 2013 protests unseated a NATO-unfriendly government.

Defending the prompt intervention of CSTO peacekeeping forces in Kazakhstan, Putin said, “it was necessary to react without delay.” The CSTO will be on the ground “as long as necessary,” but after the mission is accomplished, “of course, the entire contingent will be withdrawn from the country.” Forces are expected to exit later this week.

But here’s the clincher: “CSTO countries have shown that they will not allow chaos and ‘color revolutions’ to be implemented inside their borders.”

Putin was in synch with Kazakh State Secretary Erlan Karin, who was the first, on the record, to apply the correct terminology to events in his country: What happened was a “hybrid terrorist attack,” by both internal and external forces, aimed at overthrowing the government.

The tangled hybrid web
Virtually no one knows about it. But last December, another coup was discreetly thwarted in the Kyrgyz capital, Bishkek. Kyrgyz intel sources attribute the engineering to a rash of NGOs linked with Britain and Turkey. That introduces an absolutely key facet of The Big Picture: NATO-linked intel and their assets may have been preparing a simultaneous color revolution offensive across Central Asia.

On my Central Asia travels in late 2019, pre-Covid, it was plain to see how western NGOs – Hybrid War fronts – remained extremely powerful in both Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. Yet, they are just one nexus in a western nebulae of Hybrid War fog deployed across Central Asia, and West Asia for that matter. Here we see the CIA and the US Deep State crisscrossing MI6 and different strands of Turkish intel.

When President Tokayev was referring, in code, to a “single center,” he meant a so far ‘secret’ US-Turk-Israeli military-intel operations room based in the southern business hub of Almaty, according to a highly placed Central Asia intel source. In this “center,” there were 22 Americans, 16 Turks and 6 Israelis coordinating sabotage gangs – trained in West Asia by the Turks – and then rat-lined to Almaty.

The op started to unravel for good when Kazakh forces – with the help of Russian/CSTO intel – retook control of the vandalized Almaty airport, which was supposed to be turned into a hub for receiving foreign military supplies.

The Hybrid War west had to be stunned and livid at how the CSTO intercepted the Kazakh operation at such lightning speed. The key element is that the secretary of Russian National Security Council, Nikolai Patrushev, saw the Big Picture eons ago.

So, it’s no mystery why Russia’s aerospace and aero-transported forces, plus the massive necessary support infrastructure, were virtually ready to go.

Back in November, Patrushev’s laser was already focused on the degrading security situation in Afghanistan. Tajik political scientist Parviz Mullojanov was among the very few who were stressing that there were as many as 8,000 imperial machine Salafi-jihadi assets, shipped by a rat line from Syria and Iraq, loitering in the wilds of northern Afghanistan.

That’s the bulk of ISIS-Khorasan – or ISIS reconstituted near the borders of Turkmenistan. Some of them were duly transported to Kyrgyzstan. From there, it was very easy to cross the border from Bishek and show up in Almaty.

It took no time for Patrushev and his team to figure out, after the imperial retreat from Kabul, how this jihadi reserve army would be used: along the 7,500 km-long border between Russia and the Central Asian ‘stans’.

That explains, among other things, a record number of preparation drills conducted in late 2021 at the 210th Russian military base in Tajikistan.

James Bond speaks Turkish
The breakdown of the messy Kazakh op necessarily starts with the usual suspects: the US Deep State, which all but “sang” its strategy in a 2019 RAND corporation report, Extending Russia. Chapter 4, on “geopolitical measures”, details everything from “providing lethal aid to Ukraine”, “promoting regime change in Belarus”, and “increasing support for Syrian rebels” – all major fails – to “reducing Russian influence in Central Asia.”

That was the master concept. Implementation fell to the MI6-Turk connection.

The CIA and MI6 had been investing in dodgy outfits in Central Asia since at least 2005, when they encouraged the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU), then close to the Taliban, to wreak havoc in southern Kyrgyzstan. Nothing happened.

It was a completely different story by May 2021, when the MI6’s Jonathan Powell met the leadership of Jabhat al-Nusra – which harbors a lot of Central Asian jihadis – somewhere in the Turkish-Syrian border near Idlib. The deal was that these ‘moderate rebels’ – in US terminology – would cease to be branded ‘terrorists’ as long as they followed the anti-Russia NATO agenda.

That was one of the key prep moves ahead of the jihadist ratline to Afghanistan – complete with Central Asia branching out.

The genesis of the offensive should be found in June 2020, when former ambassador to Turkey from 2014 to 2018, Richard Moore, was appointed head of MI6. Moore may not have an inch of Kim Philby’s competence, but he does fit the profile: rabid Russophobe, and a cheerleader of the Great Turania fantasy, which promotes a pan-Turk confederation of Turkic-speaking peoples from West Asia and the Caucasus to Central Asia and even Russian republics in the Volga.

MI6 is deeply entrenched in all the ‘stans’ except autarchic Turkmenistan – cleverly riding the pan-Turkist offensive as the ideal vehicle to counter Russia and China.

Erdogan himself has been invested on a hardcore Great Turania offensive, especially after the creation of the Turkic Council in 2009. Crucially, next March, the summit of the Confederation Council of Turkic-speaking States – the new Turkic Council denomination – will take place in Kazakhstan. The city of Turkestan, in southern Kazakhstan, is expected to be named as the spiritual capital of the Turkic world.

And here, the ‘Turkic world’ enters into a frontal clash with the integrating Russian concept of Greater Eurasia Partnership, and even with the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) that, crucially, does not count Turkey as a member.

Erdogan’s short term ambition seems at first to be only commercial: after Azerbaijan won the Karabakh war, he expects to use Baku to get access to Central Asia via the Caspian Sea, complete with Turkey’s industrial-military complex sales of military technology to Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

Turkish companies are already investing heavily in real estate and infrastructure. And in parallel, Ankara’s soft power is on overdrive, finally collecting the fruits of exercising a lot of pressure, for instance, to speed up the transition in Kazakhstan from Cyrillic script to the Latin alphabet, starting in 2023.

Yet both Russia and China are very much aware that Turkey essentially represents NATO entering Central Asia. The organization of Turkic states are cryptically called the Kazakh operation ‘fuel protests’.

It’s all very murky. Erdogan’s neo-Ottomanism – which comes with massive cheerleading by his Muslim Brotherhood base – essentially has nothing to do with the pan-Turanic drive, which is a racialist movement predicating domination by relatively ‘pure’ Turks.

The problem is that they are converging while becoming more extreme, with Turkey’s right-wing Grey Wolves deeply implicated. That explains why Ankara intel is a sponsor and, in many cases, a weaponizer of both the ISIS-Khorasan franchise and those Turan racists, from Bosnia to Xinjiang via Central Asia.

The Empire handsomely profits from this toxic association, in Armenia, for instance. And the same would happen in Kazakhstan if the operation is successful.

Bring on the Trojan Horses
Every color revolution needs a ‘Maximum’ Trojan Horse. In our case, that seems to be the role of former head of KNB (National Security Committee) Karim Massimov, now held in prison and charged with treason.

Hugely ambitious, Massimov is half-Uyghur and that, in theory, obstructed what he saw as his pre-ordained rise to power. His connections with Turkish intel are not yet fully detailed, unlike his cozy relationship with Joe Biden and son.

A former Minister of Internal Affairs and State Security, Lt Gen Felix Kulov, has weaved a fascinating tangled web explaining the possible internal dynamics of the ‘coup’ built into the color revolution.

According to Kulov, Massimov and Samir Abish, the nephew of recently ousted Kazakh Security Council Chairman Nursultan Nazarbayev, were up to their necks in supervising ‘secret’ units of ‘bearded men’ during the riots. The KNB was directly subordinated to Nazarbayev, who until last week was the chairman of the Security Council.

When Tokayev understood the mechanics of the coup, he demoted both Massimov and Samat Abish. Then Nazarbayev ‘voluntarily’resigned from his life-long chairmanship of the Security Council. Abish then got this post, promising to stop the ‘bearded men,’and then to resign.

So that would point directly to a Nazarbayev-Tokayev clash. It makes sense as during his 29-year rule, Nazarbayev played a multi-vector game that was too westernized and which did not necessarily benefit Kazakhstan. He adopted British laws, played the pan-Turkic card with Erdogan, and allowed a tsunami of NGOs to promote an Atlanticist agenda.

Tokayev is a very smart operator. Trained by the foreign service of the former USSR, fluent in Russian and Chinese, he is totally aligned with Russia-China – which means fully in sync with the masterplan of BRI, the Eurasia Economic Union and the SCO.

Tokayev, much like Putin and Xi, understands how this BRI/EAEU/SCO triad represents the ultimate imperial nightmare, and how destabilizing Kazakhstan – a key actor in the triad – would be a mortal coup against Eurasian integration.

Kazakhstan, after all, represents 60 percent of Central Asia’s GDP, massive oil/gas and mineral resources, cutting-edge high tech industries: a secular, unitary, constitutional republic bearing a rich cultural heritage.

It didn’t take long for Tokayev to understand the merits of immediately calling the CSTO to the rescue: Kazakhstan signed the treaty way back in 1994. After all, Tokayev was fighting a foreign-led coup against his government.

Putin, among others, has stressed how an official Kazakh investigation is the only one entitled to get to the heart of the matter. It’s still unclear exactly who – and to what extent – sponsored the rioting mobs. Motives abound: to sabotage a pro-Russia/China government, to provoke Russia, to sabotage BRI, to plunder mineral resources, to turbo-charge a House of Saud-style ‘Islamization’.

Rushed to only a few days before the start of the Russia-US ‘security guarantees’ in Geneva, this color revolution represented a sort of counter-ultimatum – in desperation – by the NATO establishment.

Central Asia, West Asia, and the overwhelming majority of the Global South have witnessed the lightning fast Eurasian response by the CSTO troops – who, having now done their job, are set to leave Kazakhstan in a couple of days – and how this color revolution has failed, miserably.

It might as well be the last. Beware the rage of a humiliated Empire.
 
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sToRmR1dR

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
'What's the hurry?: Does the US have "plan B"?'

12 JAN, 2022
'The "plan B" - Installment of "new Guaido".'

18 Jan, 2022

(Translated by Google)

With the departure of the CSTO, the US military and the CIA arrived in Kazakhstan

2022-01-17
 

sToRmR1dR

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
'Another attempt for color revolution.'

(Translated by Google)

Dissatisfied with Tokayev promise protests in Kazakhstan today (videos)

2022-11-27

13 hours ago

(Translated by Google)

Protests in Kazakhstan: Are those dissatisfied with Tokayev preparing for radical action?

2022-11-27

26 NOV, 2022

'Everything is ready for color revolution.'
 

youlik

Dagobah Resident
We will always honor the courage of the heroes: Tokayev spoke about the December events

President of Kazakhstan Kassym-Jomart Tokayev spoke about the December events of 1986. He wrote on his official Twitter that Kazakhstanis will keep the memory of the victims of Zheltoksan.

"Today is the 36th anniversary of the December events that left an indelible mark on the history of our country. They showed the unshakable spirit of our people, our firm desire for freedom and Independence. We will always honor the courage of the heroes and keep the memory of the victims of Zheltoksan," the president said.
Мы всегда будем чтить мужество героев: Токаев высказался о декабрьских событиях

I had to participate personally in what Tokayev is talking about. I served in the Soviet Army then and was in northern Kazakhstan. Then it was the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic within the USSR. We didn't think about the roots and preparation of these then, but even then it was obvious that this was a clear manifestation of nationalism. It seems Tokayev is becoming more and more clearly on the Ukrainian track, well, the final will be the same as with Ukraine.
In the village where I was, by the way, there were no victims. The total population in this village then was about 5-6 thousand people. Police department - up to 10 people. When the events began, a crowd of young Kazakhs gathered in the center of the village - up to 100 people. They started hooliganism. The policemen could not do anything with them and came to our unit to ask for help to restore order. We also had a small military unit - 120-130 people, not counting officers. Then they gathered free soldiers, explained the situation and took those who wanted to participate by car to the center of the village. There were 50-60 people willing. We were not given any weapons, instead, according to the then tradition, we used waist belts with a heavy brass buckle. That's how we dispersed the Kazakhs in the surrounding forests. The fight was memorable. We did not detain anyone, no one set us such a task. They just said to clear the village, so we just beat them, they ran, we caught up and beat them again.

В том, о чем говорит Токаев мне пришлось участвовать лично. Я служил тогда в Советской Армии и был в северном казахстане. Тогда это была Казахская Советская Социалистическая Республика в составе СССР. Про корни и подготовку этих мы тогда не задумывались, однако уже тогда было очевидно, что это явное проявление национализма. Похоже Токаев все более четко становится на украинскую дорожку, ну чтож финал будет таким же как и с украиной.
В поселке где я был, кстати, жертв не было. Всего населения в этом поселке тогда было примерно 5-6 тысяч человек. Отдел милиции- до 10 человек. Когда начались события, в центре поселка собралась толпа молодых казахов-до 100 человек. Они начали хулиганить. Милиционеры ничего не могли с ними сделать и пришли к нам в часть просить помощи навести порядок. Военная часть у нас была тоже не большая- человек 120-130, не считая офицеров. Тогда собрали свободных солдатиков, объяснили ситуацию и желающих поучаствовать отвезли на машине в центр поселка. Желающих набралось человек 50-60. Оружия нам никакого не давали, вместо него мы по тогдашней традиции использовали поясные ремни с увесистой латунной пряжкой. Вот так и разогнали мы тогда казахов по окрестным лесам. Драка была запоминающаяся. Мы никого не задерживали, нам такой задачи никто не ставил. Сказали просто очистить поселок, вот мы просто били их, они бежали, мы догоняли и опять били.
 
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