Keto recipes

Laura

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Meanwhile, I've updated the Fat Bomb Custard. As you notice, my recipes keep getting larger. I wasn't willing to experiment with too much at first, but obviously, with 13 people in the house, in order for everyone to have a "fat bomb" every day that is sufficient to actually be useful, I have to make a large batch. However, one or two people could make the larger amount and keep it in the fridge and have it on hand for a number of days.

So, here's the latest.

1 liter - one quart - coconut milk.

23 egg yolks

500 grams / one pound butter

2 cups coconut oil

11 tsps xylitol - I think that stevia and/or erythritol could be used. I'm going to experiment further with that.

vanilla, liquid and a bit of powder if wanted

Put the coconut milk, butter, coconut oil, sweetener in the pot. (I use a heat disperser on a gas stove under the pot.) When it gets hot and starts steaming and looking like it wants to get close to boiling, drizzle the egg yolks in while beating constantly with a whisk (or electric mixer). Continue heating while stirring well constantly. Don't let it boil. It will thicken some... at this point, I added a couple of teaspoons of plain gelatin. I just sprinkled it on the top and whisked it in quickly. Then, after about a minute, I put the pot into cold water in the sink and kept stirring for a few minutes. Then, added the vanilla and ladled into dessert dishes and put in the fridge.

If you want to add cocoa powder, add it to the coconut milk/butter mix before adding the eggs and whisk well. I tried it with about three tablespoons and didn't have to increase the sweetness and it was decently chocolate.

The coconut milk has 17 grams of fat per 100 ml. so that's 170 grams of fat and 40 carbs
23 yolks = 184 grams fat
500 grams of butter = 300 grams of fat
2 cups coconut oil = 459 grams fat
11 tsps xylitol = 44 grams carbs

Total fat = 1113 grams
carbs = 84

Divided into ten servings: 111 grams of fat, 8 carbs. So one can get THAT MUCH fat in and enjoy it and only use of 8 carbs of a 20 or 30 carb per day allowance. And if I find that the other sweeteners can be used and tolerated and don't mess up the taste, then even better!

The beauty of it is that MOST of the fat here is MCT.

snagged from wikipedia said:
Medium-chain triglycerides

MCTs passively diffuse from the GI tract to the portal system (longer fatty acids are absorbed into the lymphatic system) without requirement for modification like long-chain fatty acids or very-long-chain fatty acids. In addition, MCTs do not require bile salts for digestion. Patients that have malnutrition or malabsorption syndromes are treated with MCTs because they do not require energy for absorption, utilization, or storage. ...

Some studies have shown that MCTs can help in the process of excess calorie burning, and thus weight loss. MCTs are also seen as promoting fat oxidation and reduced food intake. ...

Studies have also shown promising results for neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease) and epilepsy through the use of ketogenic dieting.

Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.

In the 1960s, it was discovered that medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) produce more ketone bodies per unit of energy than normal dietary fats (which are mostly long-chain triglycerides). MCTs are more efficiently absorbed and are rapidly transported to the liver via the hepatic portal system rather than the lymphatic system. The severe carbohydrate restrictions of the classic ketogenic diet made it difficult for parents to produce palatable meals that their children would tolerate. In 1971, Peter Huttenlocher devised a ketogenic diet where about 60% of the calories came from the MCT oil, and this allowed more protein and up to three times as much carbohydrate as the classic ketogenic diet. The oil was mixed with at least twice its volume of skimmed milk {Dumb!}, chilled, and sipped during the meal or incorporated into food. He tested it on twelve children and adolescents with intractable seizures. Most children improved in both seizure control and alertness, results that were similar to the classic ketogenic diet. Gastrointestinal upset was a problem, which led one patient to abandon the diet, but meals were easier to prepare and better accepted by the children. The MCT diet replaced the classic ketogenic diet in many hospitals, though some devised diets that were a combination of the two.
Some articles about MCTs:

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/issa23.htm

According to Dr. Laurie Cullen at the Women's Institute, when MCTs are absorbed into the blood stream, they bypass the digestion process that longer chain fats go through. MCT's provide quick energy for the body and are thus less likely to be stored in the fat cells. Further, Dr. Cullen says that when a meal includes medium chain triglycerides, there is a significant increase in the number of calories burned (thermogenic effect). When more calories are used, fewer are stored as fat, which helps to reduce body fat levels. ...

MCT has a smaller molecular structure and is more soluble in water. Therefore, it is easier for your body to absorb and does not require this complicated digestive process. Whereas conventional fats are prone to being stored as body fat, MCT is transported directly from the small intestine to the liver by the portal vein. In the liver, some of the MCTs are turned into ketone bodies, which the muscles can use for energy. Some MCT's are used for thermogenesis, and a portion is converted to ATP, the energy currency of the cell. MCT, therefore is processed in the liver, so there is little left to be stored as fat.
http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/article10612.htm

MCT are easily digested, absorbed, and put to use nourishing the body. Unlike other fats, they put little strain on the digestive system and provide a quick source of energy necessary to promote healing. This is important for patients who are using every ounce of strength they have to overcome serious illness or injury. It's no wonder why MCT are added to infant formulas. Actually, whether you were breast or formula fed as an infant you consumed MCT. Why? Because MCT are not only found in coconut oil but are natural and vital components of human breast milk. MCT are considered essential nutrients for infants as well as for people with serious digestive problems like cystic fibrosis. Like other essential nutrients, you must get them directly from the diet. ...

MCT are broken down almost immediately by enzymes in the saliva and gastric juices so that pancreatic fat-digesting enzymes are not even essential.1 Therefore, there is less strain on the pancreas and digestive system. This has important implications for patients who suffer from digestive and metabolic problems. Premature and ill infants especially whose digestive organs are underdeveloped, are able to absorb MCT with relative ease, while other fats pass through their systems pretty much undigested. People who suffer from malabsorption problems such as cystic fibrosis, and have difficulty digesting or absorbing fats and fat soluble vitamins, benefit greatly from MCT. They can also be of importance to people suffering from diabetes, obesity, gallbladder disease, pancreatitis Crohn's disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and some forms of cancer. ...

Eating foods containing MCT is like putting high octane fuel into your car. The car runs smoother and gets better gas mileage. Likewise, with MCT your body performs better because it has more energy and greater endurance. Because MCFA are funneled directly to the liver and converted into energy, the body gets a boost of energy. And because MCFA are easily absorbed by the energy-producing organelles of the cells, metabolism increases. This burst of energy has a stimulating effect on the entire body. ...

Besides increasing your energy level, there are other very important benefits that results from boosting your metabolic rate: it helps protect you from illness and speeds healing. When metabolism is increased, cells function at a higher rate of efficiency. They heal injuries quicker, old and diseased cells are replaced faster, and young, new cells are generated at an increased rate to replace worn-out ones. Even the immune system functions better.
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/mct-fats-found-coconut-oil-boost-brain-function-only-one-dose

Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs), the primary type of fat found within coconut oil, have been found to boost cognitive performance in older adults suffering from memory disorders as serious as Alzheimer's -- and not after months or even days of treatment, but after a single 40 ml dose!
http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/13-evidence-based-medicinal-properties-coconut-oil
 

davey72

The Living Force
erythritol - This is one i haven't heard of yet. I found that it contains stevia. Is this along the same lines as sorbitol?

From: abouterythritol.homestead.com

Erythritol has a high digestive tolerance: 2 to 3 times better than xylitol, lactitol, maltitol and isomalt; 3 to 4 times better than sorbitol and mannitol.
From: _http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/erythritol.htm
What is Erythritol?
Erythritol is a naturally-derived sugar substitute that looks and tastes very much like sugar, yet has almost no calories. It comes in granulated and powdered forms.

Erythritol has been used in Japan since 1990 in candies, chocolate, yogurt, fillings, jellies, jams, beverages, and as a sugar substitute.

Erythritol is classified as a sugar alcohol. Sugar alcohols, also called polyols, are sugar substitutes that are either extracted from plants or manufactured from starches. Some of the more common sugar alcohol sweeteners are sorbitol and xylitol.

Sugar alcohols also occur naturally in plants. Erythritol is found naturally in small amounts in grapes, melons, mushrooms, and fermented foods such as wine, beer, cheese, and soy sauce.

How Sweet is Erythritol?
Erythritol is approximately 70 percent as sweet as table sugar (sucrose). Some manufacturers, however, claim that their erythritol products are as sweet as sugar.

How is Erythritol Made?
Erythritol is usually made from plant sugars. Sugar is mixed with water and then fermented with a natural culture into erythritol. It is then filtered, allowed to crystallize, and then dried. The finished product is white granules or powder that resembles sugar.

Why Do People Use Erythritol?
Erythritol has almost no calories. In the United States, erythritol is labeled as having 0.2 calories per gram, which is 95 percent fewer calories than sugar. In Japan, erythritol is labeled as having zero calories.

Erythritol has not been found to affect blood sugar or insulin levels and has a zero glycemic index.

Erthyritol has a sweet taste. Some say it tastes more like sugar than other natural sweeteners such as stevia (which can be bitter) while others dislike the taste.

In small amounts, erythritol is not supposed to cause digestive upset and diarrhea that other sugar alcohols like sorbitol and xylitol are known to cause, because erythritol is a smaller molecule and 90 percent of erythritol is absorbed in the small intestine and excreted for the most part unchanged in urine. This quality makes erythritol unique among the sugar alcohols. Many people, however, report side effects such as diarrhea, stomach upset, and headache after consuming normal amounts of erythritol in food or beverages.
Erythritol isn’t metabolized by oral bacteria, which means that it doesn’t contribute to tooth decay. Erythritol was approved for use as a sugar substitute in Japan in 1990. In the United States, it is classified as being Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) since 1997. It was approved in Australia and New Zealand in 1999.

What are the Side Effects?
Excessive consumption of erythritol (over 80 grams per day) may result in digestive upset, diarrhea, and bloating.

What are the Downsides of Erythritol?

Erythritol has a cooling effect on the mouth, unlike sugar.
Erythritol isn’t as sweet as sugar. It is approximately 70 percent as sweet.
Erythritol doesn’t dissolve as easily as sugar.
Erythritol causes side effects such as diarrhea, headache, and stomachache in lower amounts in some people
Erythritol still isn’t easy to find. Currently it is available online and in some health food stores and groceries.
 

Laura

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Emmerich (in book linked previously) recommends making mayonnaise out of bacon fat and salad dressings out of MCT oil. So, we'll be trying that.

She makes a lot of recommendations about dealing with the issues of keto-adaptation such as the "keto flu" and aches that you get when the body starts unloading a lot of retained fluids. She also describes her day as "intermittant fasting." She gets up at about 6 but doesn't eat until about 9 or 10. Her last meal the previous day (two meals a day) is in mid-afternoon. We have been doing pretty much the same thing here so I guess we've been "intermittant fasting". She explains all the benefits.
 

Approaching Infinity

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Laura said:
The coconut milk has 17 grams of fat per 100 ml. so that's 170 grams of fat and 40 carbs
23 yolks = 184 grams fat
500 grams of butter = 300 grams of fat
2 cups coconut oil = 459 grams fat
11 tsps xylitol = 44 grams carbs

Total fat = 1113 grams
carbs = 84
Cool! The coconut cream we've got (Kara brand) has around 260 g fat/liter and no carbs. But our egg yolks are only around 6.5 grams of fat each. So using our ingredients, we'd get:

Total fat = 1169 g (117 g/serving)
Carbs = 44 g (4.4 g/serving)

Not bad! We tried a 103 g fat/serving custard yesterday and it was YUMMY! Today we tried 'warm milkshakes' with breakfast (~80 g fat/serving). In addition to our bacon and sausage, that might have been a bit too much! My stomach felt just a tad too full for the next hour or so. Haven't tried adding the coconut oil yet, though.
 

Gaby

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I'm still trying to get a hold of coconut milk and cream, but I'll come up with something with the coconut oil I got.

Butter is the other source of medium chain fatty acid in this fat bomb custard :D

According to this source:

_http://paleoleap.com/the-many-virtues-of-butter/

Another important point concerning the fat composition of butter is the presence of medium-chain fatty acids, the main one being lauric acid. Those medium-chain fatty acids have antimicrobial properties. The presence of those fatty acids in butter notes their importance for a growing child, perhaps in great part for its antimicrobial activity and the development of a healthy gut flora that is so important at a young age. Coconut oil is composed of about 66% medium-chain fatty acids, but butter will probably contain an amount proportional to what’s optimal for a healthy gut flora because too much antimicrobial activity can destroy the beneficial bacterial population as well.
I think the last sentence is just merely speculation though, specially considering that coconut oil is used in ketogenic diets for children.
 

Laura

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I'm getting some erythritol to make the bomb better; I'd like for it to be pretty much carb free so I could spend my carbs on a salad or something.
 

Goemon_

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Laura said:
The coconut milk has 17 grams of fat per 100 ml. so that's 170 grams of fat and 40 carbs
23 yolks = 184 grams fat
500 grams of butter = 300 grams of fat
2 cups coconut oil = 459 grams fat
11 tsps xylitol = 44 grams carbs

Total fat = 1113 grams
carbs = 84
I don't know what butter you use but regular butter is 82% of fat so 500 grams = 410 grams of fat. I don't see why you would use any other form of butter so I guess it is a miscalculation.

My 2 cents
 

Approaching Infinity

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Goemon_ said:
Laura said:
The coconut milk has 17 grams of fat per 100 ml. so that's 170 grams of fat and 40 carbs
23 yolks = 184 grams fat
500 grams of butter = 300 grams of fat
2 cups coconut oil = 459 grams fat
11 tsps xylitol = 44 grams carbs

Total fat = 1113 grams
carbs = 84
I don't know what butter you use but regular butter is 82% of fat so 500 grams = 410 grams of fat. I don't see why you would use any other form of butter so I guess it is a miscalculation.

My 2 cents
That's right. Our butter is 82%, with 370 g of fat in one box (452 g). Using just that much butter, plus our Kara coconut cream, that would bring the custard we make here to 125 g per serving (1/10 of total batch)!
 

Laura

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Goemon_ said:
Laura said:
The coconut milk has 17 grams of fat per 100 ml. so that's 170 grams of fat and 40 carbs
23 yolks = 184 grams fat
500 grams of butter = 300 grams of fat
2 cups coconut oil = 459 grams fat
11 tsps xylitol = 44 grams carbs

Total fat = 1113 grams
carbs = 84
I don't know what butter you use but regular butter is 82% of fat so 500 grams = 410 grams of fat. I don't see why you would use any other form of butter so I guess it is a miscalculation.

My 2 cents
That was an approximation based on a figure given to me by someone else. I figured better to underestimate than overestimate. Thanks to you now I have a better figure!
 

Laura

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Approaching Infinity said:
That's right. Our butter is 82%, with 370 g of fat in one box (452 g). Using just that much butter, plus our Kara coconut cream, that would bring the custard we make here to 125 g per serving (1/10 of total batch)!
Which means that the fat bomb can deliver almost your entire day's load of fat!
 

Oxajil

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Thank you for sharing this, I'll be trying this out. It would also be a very good thing to bring along to work or school.
 

Laura

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Oxajil said:
Thank you for sharing this, I'll be trying this out. It would also be a very good thing to bring along to work or school.
Yes indeedy!

In fact, it reminds me of the first time I ever heard of the "carbohydrate diet". I was working in the foodstamp office in FL back in 1979 and one of the lead workers brought in a plastic bowl of chocolate pudding with a thick layer of whipped cream on top; that was her lunch EVERY DAY. It was diet pudding, with almost no calories (evil artificial sweetener I'm sure) and the cream was the fat part. She swore by the diet and never seemed to be tired of her pudding lunch.

Well, I understand you can whip coconut cream too, so anyone who has to pack a lunch can just take this little gem along with them. I would make sure it was very cold in the morning and then it would still be cool by lunchtime.

So, you could make a big batch once a week and pour it into little covered glass dishes and have it ready to go every day.
 

Polonel

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Laura said:
Yes indeedy!

In fact, it reminds me of the first time I ever heard of the "carbohydrate diet". I was working in the foodstamp office in FL back in 1979 and one of the lead workers brought in a plastic bowl of chocolate pudding with a thick layer of whipped cream on top; that was her lunch EVERY DAY. It was diet pudding, with almost no calories (evil artificial sweetener I'm sure) and the cream was the fat part. She swore by the diet and never seemed to be tired of her pudding lunch.

Well, I understand you can whip coconut cream too, so anyone who has to pack a lunch can just take this little gem along with them. I would make sure it was very cold in the morning and then it would still be cool by lunchtime.

So, you could make a big batch once a week and pour it into little covered glass dishes and have it ready to go every day.
Yes, that's exactly what I want to do. With my previous job, I had access to a real kitchen, and I used to take some bone broth full of butter with me, in my vacuum bottle. The butter was solidifying again after a few hours, and I needed to warm the broth a little bit in a bowl before drinking it.
I can't to this with my new job (I don't have access to a kitchen and a sink for the dishes anymore, just the standard microwave oven). The chocolate coconut cream shake thing looks interesting, I'm gonna buy a blender this week, and I'm gonna find the perfect keto-shake fat bomb recipe !

Laura said:
ut the coconut milk, butter, coconut oil, sweetener in the pot. (I use a heat disperser on a gas stove under the pot.) When it gets hot and starts steaming and looking like it wants to get close to boiling, drizzle the egg yolks in while beating constantly with a whisk (or electric mixer). Continue heating while stirring well constantly. Don't let it boil. It will thicken some... at this point, I added a couple of teaspoons of plain gelatin. I just sprinkled it on the top and whisked it in quickly. Then, after about a minute, I put the pot into cold water in the sink and kept stirring for a few minutes. Then, added the vanilla and ladled into dessert dishes and put in the fridge.
I tried a first batch of coconut cream custard and it was a catastrophe. The taste is good but the texture is godawful, very "granular". Maybe I applied too much heat, maybe I didn't stir enough.
 
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