Keto recipes

Laura

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Everyone should please look up and calculate the fat/carbs in every recipe and provide that information.
 

Nancy2feathers

The Living Force
Quote: Can the coconut cream be substituted with canned coconut milk? The one i have gets very thick, and cream like.

I buy the Native Forest Organic Coconut Milk (unsweetened) in the can. It`s very thick and has to be scooped out of the can. I usually put it in the blender and smooth it all together before use. It`s the consistency of mousse.

One can, 13.5 fl oz = 9g of saturated fat per serving
25mg sodium "
1g sugar "
1g protein "
100 calories per per serving, 7 servings per can, 90 calories from fat.

I tried other brands but just didn`t compare to the above. I find it at one grocery store for$ $2.50 a can and in other grocery stores $4.00 for the same product. I purchase a couple cases at the cheaper price at a time and go through quite a bit in a week. The expiration date is 8/21/15, so it`s shelf life lasts a while, which is excellent.

I was wondering if this brand of coconut Cream/Milk, is found any where else? (Native Forest)
 

trendsetter37

The Living Force
Laura said:
Everyone should please look up and calculate the fat/carbs in every recipe and provide that information.

Are you guys calculating the calories per gram of (enter macronutrient here) to get your fat / carb ratios? Because awhile back I was looking into this while weighing portions of fat and meat; long story short if i was roughly around 50/ 50 or 60/40 fat/protein in grams I would be closer to the ratio (70/30 or 80/20) in terms of caloric energy from the fat and protein If I broke them down to calorie count.

A couple of searches yielded that 1 gram of fat is 9 (cal/kcal) of energy where as protein and carbs only contain around 4 calories per gram. Ergo I began calculating my fat to protein ratios with the caloric energy input as opposed to the mass or weight I was consuming. Is this the correct way of getting the correct ratios or would you also need to pay more attention to the amount in terms of weight (grams) to be more sufficient?
 

Arwenn

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trendsetter37 said:
Laura said:
Everyone should please look up and calculate the fat/carbs in every recipe and provide that information.

Are you guys calculating the calories per gram of (enter macronutrient here) to get your fat / carb ratios? Because awhile back I was looking into this while weighing portions of fat and meat; long story short if i was roughly around 50/ 50 or 60/40 fat/protein in grams I would be closer to the ratio (70/30 or 80/20) in terms of caloric energy from the fat and protein If I broke them down to calorie count.

A couple of searches yielded that 1 gram of fat is 9 (cal/kcal) of energy where as protein and carbs only contain around 4 calories per gram. Ergo I began calculating my fat to protein ratios with the caloric energy input as opposed to the mass or weight I was consuming. Is this the correct way of getting the correct ratios or would you also need to pay more attention to the amount in terms of weight (grams) to be more sufficient?


trendsetter, I could be wrong here but what I think Laura wants is quantities of fat to carbs, as she stated in her recipe a few posts back:

Laura said:
Okay, another I just made for lunch (I chilled it in the freezer while preparing a slice of ham for the meal). I've given approximations of different measuring systems which are close enough. I gotta tell ya, this is divine and boy, does your body ever feel full, sated, and happy with this one!

Coconut Cream Custard

9 tablespoons – 130 grams – 4.5 ounces butter (121 grams fat)

1 cup – 200 ml – 8 ounces coconut cream (24 grams fat, 4 carbs)

4 or 5 egg yolks (8 grams fat each , 1 carb each)

2.5 tsp xylitol (10 carbs)

Dash of vanilla – liquid and/or powder (maybe 1 or 2 carbs)

Place coconut cream and butter cut in pieces, and xylitol in small saucepan or top of double-boiler. Bring to small bubble stage stirring constantly or very frequently. Take off heat. While beating the cream/butter mixture, drizzle in already beaten egg yolks until completely mixed. Place back on heat and stir constantly until it thickens and just begins to bubble around the edges. Remove from heat. Add vanilla to taste. Place pan in cold water and stir to cool faster, about five minutes. Pour into dessert dishes and refrigerate until cold.

Divided in two, each serving has about 85 grams of fat and 9 carbs.

Be careful with these things because there ARE carbs in there. You could add a couple more egg yolks and a bit more butter to make it 100 grams of fat and thus get more of your fat allowance along with the carbs. I'll do that next time.


It is not about calculating calories or energy. OSIT
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
trendsetter37 said:
Is this the correct way of getting the correct ratios or would you also need to pay more attention to the amount in terms of weight (grams) to be more sufficient?

I recall from the extensive keto thread information that 3/1 ratio of calories was what you want to at least be at. I remember something being 1.7, the amount of fat you should eat compared to protein. Does my math look right?

50 grams of fat is 450 calories. That makes for 37.5 grams ((450 / 3) / 4) of protein. That comes out to 75% of the fat you ate.

At the 4:1 ratio: 50 grams of fat is 450 calories. That makes for 28.125 ((450 / 4) / 4) grams of protein. That comes out to eating 56.25% protein of the fat you ate.

Looks like the 3:1 ratio is 1.3333 times the protein in grams and the 4:1 is 1.7778 times the protein in grams.
 

trendsetter37

The Living Force
Arwenn said:
trendsetter37 said:
Laura said:
Everyone should please look up and calculate the fat/carbs in every recipe and provide that information.

Are you guys calculating the calories per gram of (enter macronutrient here) to get your fat / carb ratios? Because awhile back I was looking into this while weighing portions of fat and meat; long story short if i was roughly around 50/ 50 or 60/40 fat/protein in grams I would be closer to the ratio (70/30 or 80/20) in terms of caloric energy from the fat and protein If I broke them down to calorie count.

A couple of searches yielded that 1 gram of fat is 9 (cal/kcal) of energy where as protein and carbs only contain around 4 calories per gram. Ergo I began calculating my fat to protein ratios with the caloric energy input as opposed to the mass or weight I was consuming. Is this the correct way of getting the correct ratios or would you also need to pay more attention to the amount in terms of weight (grams) to be more sufficient?


trendsetter, I could be wrong here but what I think Laura wants is quantities of fat to carbs, as she stated in her recipe a few posts back:

Laura said:
Okay, another I just made for lunch (I chilled it in the freezer while preparing a slice of ham for the meal). I've given approximations of different measuring systems which are close enough. I gotta tell ya, this is divine and boy, does your body ever feel full, sated, and happy with this one!

Coconut Cream Custard

9 tablespoons – 130 grams – 4.5 ounces butter (121 grams fat)

1 cup – 200 ml – 8 ounces coconut cream (24 grams fat, 4 carbs)

4 or 5 egg yolks (8 grams fat each , 1 carb each)

2.5 tsp xylitol (10 carbs)

Dash of vanilla – liquid and/or powder (maybe 1 or 2 carbs)

Place coconut cream and butter cut in pieces, and xylitol in small saucepan or top of double-boiler. Bring to small bubble stage stirring constantly or very frequently. Take off heat. While beating the cream/butter mixture, drizzle in already beaten egg yolks until completely mixed. Place back on heat and stir constantly until it thickens and just begins to bubble around the edges. Remove from heat. Add vanilla to taste. Place pan in cold water and stir to cool faster, about five minutes. Pour into dessert dishes and refrigerate until cold.

Divided in two, each serving has about 85 grams of fat and 9 carbs.

Be careful with these things because there ARE carbs in there. You could add a couple more egg yolks and a bit more butter to make it 100 grams of fat and thus get more of your fat allowance along with the carbs. I'll do that next time.


It is not about calculating calories or energy. OSIT




Ah ok thanks for the clarification. I guess my point is moot either way because looking at the breakdown; if you get the ratio correct in the quantities then caloric ratios will be correct as well. Sorry for the noise.


3D Student said:
trendsetter37 said:
Is this the correct way of getting the correct ratios or would you also need to pay more attention to the amount in terms of weight (grams) to be more sufficient?

I recall from the extensive keto thread information that 3/1 ratio of calories was what you want to at least be at. I remember something being 1.7, the amount of fat you should eat compared to protein. Does my math look right?

50 grams of fat is 450 calories. That makes for 37.5 grams ((450 / 3) / 4) of protein. That comes out to 75% of the fat you ate.

At the 4:1 ratio: 50 grams of fat is 450 calories. That makes for 28.125 ((450 / 4) / 4) grams of protein. That comes out to eating 56.25% protein of the fat you ate.

Looks like the 3:1 ratio is 1.3333 times the protein in grams and the 4:1 is 1.7778 times the protein in grams.

Right and that makes sense the only thing that trips me up is that 50 grams of fat and 37.5 grams of protein ---> would equate to roughtly 57% fat and 43% protein with respect to total quantity in grams. However converting those values to the energy units your body would view those substances as would yield (fat --> 50 grams --> 450 calories) and (protein --> 37.5 grams --> 150 calories). The fat to protein ratios with respect to how your body views them would be, in this example at least, 75% fat and 25% protein.

It looks like fat is much more efficient overall but the proportions 75%/25% calories (which would adhere to the previously mention 3/1 ratio) calories was a bit different from 57%/43% (grams or quantity) and could be the difference between being in ketosis and almost there depending on which 'unit of measurement' mattered to the body. I tend to lean towards that being the former unit of calories.

But with all of that being said I guess it doesn't matter when discussing recipes as you can't really account for every single detail like this all the time. Especially in the times ahead.

I guess I will add my ghee butter sauces in few! Because that is what I do to overcompensate for the protein. Will post later today when I get home. :P
 

Laura

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trendsetter37 said:
Are you guys calculating the calories per gram of (enter macronutrient here) to get your fat / carb ratios? Because awhile back I was looking into this while weighing portions of fat and meat; long story short if i was roughly around 50/ 50 or 60/40 fat/protein in grams I would be closer to the ratio (70/30 or 80/20) in terms of caloric energy from the fat and protein If I broke them down to calorie count.

A couple of searches yielded that 1 gram of fat is 9 (cal/kcal) of energy where as protein and carbs only contain around 4 calories per gram. Ergo I began calculating my fat to protein ratios with the caloric energy input as opposed to the mass or weight I was consuming. Is this the correct way of getting the correct ratios or would you also need to pay more attention to the amount in terms of weight (grams) to be more sufficient?

If you want to do that, fine. I just want the recipes to give the grams of fat, carbs, protein, if any.
 

Laura

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If you want to use the coconut milk, I think that's fine based on Nancy2F's breakdown of the content.

I edited the custard recipe because we discovered today that I gave the figures of the coconut milk for 100 ml, not the whole carton. So, the custards are actually more fat than I calculated.

Today, I made a triple batch with some additions. It made seven servings. Here's the list of ingredients:

600 ml - 3 cups of coconut cream = 144 grams fat 24 carbs

15 egg yolks - 8 grams fat each = 120 grams of fat

375 grams butter = 300 grams fat

95 ml - 7 tablespoons coconut oil = 95 grams fat

8 tsp xylitol = 32 carbs

vanilla powder and a bit of liquid

Make the same as previous directions. NEVER let it boil. (Thought I should mention that.) JUST let it start to bubble around the edges and then take off the fire both at the first stage, and the re-heating after whisking in the egg yolks.

That's a total of 659 grams of fat and 56 carbs.

Per person (7) 94 grams of fat, 8 carbs.

The point of this, just so all of you keep it in mind, is to keep the carbs WAAAAAAAY down, and pushing the fat WAAAAAAAY UP, while remaining palatable. Since I am so sensitive to carbs (been learning the hard way), I want to keep my daily carb intake below 30; 20 is better. So please keep that in mind when you post your recipes. Most people need to stay below 50. And those carbs add up, like in your meat and veggies. If I can get about half my fat with only 8 carrying carbs, I'm very happy!
 

darksai

Jedi Master
dugdeep said:
One I came up with after refining the "butter coffee" idea is BUTTER HOT CHOCOLATE. It is absolutely divine and gets the fat count up. It has somehow taken on the name "chococcino" here in the house (pronounce chok-o-keeno, for some reason :lol: ).

80-100g of butter, cubed
2 heaping Tbsp cocoa powder
15-20g cocoa butter (this is the secret ingredient! Adds fat and deliciousity)
2 Tbsp xylitol
3 drops stevia extract
1 tsp lecithin (optional)
A healthy pinch of salt (don't be shy here)
750mL water

Heat the water in a pot on the stove. Once boiled, take off the heat and whisk in cocoa, xylitol and stevia. Add cold butter, cocoa butter and lecithin to a blender. Pour in the chocolatey liquid and blend well until it's frothy and delicious. Serves 3 or 4, but everyone will probably want seconds!

This sounds way better than what my recipe! I just blended a llite hot water with 2-3 tsp butter/coconut oil, then added 3 tsp cocao and 1.5 tsp xylitol, blend, top up to about a cup with hot water, then blend again.

Only a day or two ago I found about the detriments of raw egg white, which saddened me a bit because I'd just come up with a yummy chocolate sauce-mousse-kinda-thing which is really fast and easy to make (much easier than chocolate!). I'd like to post it anyway in case anyone can think of a way to replace the egg white.

For one serving, beat one egg white with 1-2tsp xylitol (or to taste) while melting 2 tbsp butter/coconut oil. Take the fat off the heat and let it cool a bit, whisk in 3 tsp cocoa, then an egg yolk (after which it looks a complete failure) then whisk in the egg white. A liquid sweetener can be mixed with the fat and cocoa instead. The consistency of course depends on how stiff the whites are beaten, though I didn't try going further than the "thick runny foam" level, which gives it a light (a better word that comes to mind is "airy", if you can imagine what I mean) and creamy texture. Left in the fridge for a while it comes out as a very thick sauce.
 

Laura

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That sounds like something Ark used to make for himself; he calls it "kogel mogel" or something like that. The last time he tried it, it made him sick for two days.

Egg whites? No thanks.
 

jsf

Jedi Master
Here is a link with a lot of books about low-carb recipes : _http://healthylowcarbliving.com/features/shopping/
 

dugdeep

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Fat:carb:protein ratio for the "chococcino":

120g fat; 24g carbs; 3g protein.

Those carbs are all xylitol, so I think the actual usable carbohydrate would be lower. Divide those figures into 3 or 4 servings and you're laughing. I think I'll try experimenting with using coconut cream instead of water to get the fat count up even higher. Maybe add some egg yolks, too :cool2:

I'm thinking about maybe making one of my daily meals some sort of "smoothie", something along the lines of Laura's milkshake. Time to jack up my fat consumption!
 

shellycheval

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
NTF
Native Forest Organic Coconut Milk (unsweetened) in the can

At what store(s) do you find this product Nancy? All I've found so far is sweetened with added sugar.
Thanks
shellycheval
 

Nienna

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I found two different sources on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Native-Forest-Coconut-Unsweetened-13-5-Ounce/dp/B0047YYY98

http://www.amazon.com/Native-Forest-Organic-Classic-13-5-Ounce/dp/B001HTJ2BQ

Different prices and only one of them gives the ingredients, but the cans both say the same thing. At least, this would make it possible to get it no matter where you live in the US.
 

Finduilas495

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
As I did a little experiment in the kitchen today that worked out well, I'd like to share the recipe:

Salmon Mousse

Ingredients:

280g fresh salmon - protein 56g, carbs 2.8g, fat 39.2g

150g butter - protein 0.75g, carbs 0.75g, fat 123g

juice of one small lemon - carbs 4g

salt and black pepper to taste

Fry the salmon in a bit of butter. Transfer into a bowl and mash it with a fork. Add juice of one small lemon, 150g of butter, salt and pepper to taste. Blend well and refrigerate. When serving, portion with tablespoon. Looks fancy and tastes yummy :)

Some parsley or cilantro might be nice in it too, but I didn't have any, so will leave that for next time.

It makes about 4 servings, with 14.2g protein, 1.9g carbs and 40.55g fat per serving.
 
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