Mass extinction, evolutionary leap and the virus-information connection

Michael B-C

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Pierre. Just to say your book arrived a couple of days ago. I'm only a few chapters in, so can't give a thorough response yet, but thus far thoroughly enjoying the read. As ever you distill so much information into an immediate yet clear and economical fashion that I find myself utterly gripped. What a page turner! I just love the way you introduce the reader to what would normally be mind-blowing deductions (e.g. water exchange between earth and Mars) without the slightest sense that we should be surprised or in anyway find this outlandish. The whole argument holds together like super-glue and I look forward to learning much from your work - as always - and enjoying the roller-coaster ride to the end! Much respect. Thank you and all the supporting team for all the undoubted effort that went into its distillation and publication.
 

Pierre

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Pierre. Just to say your book arrived a couple of days ago. I'm only a few chapters in, so can't give a thorough response yet, but thus far thoroughly enjoying the read. As ever you distill so much information into an immediate yet clear and economical fashion that I find myself utterly gripped. What a page turner! I just love the way you introduce the reader to what would normally be mind-blowing deductions (e.g. water exchange between earth and Mars) without the slightest sense that we should be surprised or in anyway find this outlandish. The whole argument holds together like super-glue and I look forward to learning much from your work - as always - and enjoying the roller-coaster ride to the end! Much respect. Thank you and all the supporting team for all the undoubted effort that went into its distillation and publication.
Wow, what a nice comment! :clap:
I'm really glad you enjoy your reading. If you have a few minutes to spare, you could adapt the above quote into a review on Amazon, positive reviews are our best advertising.
 

Joyly

A Disturbance in the Force
To give an idea of the structure of the book and its lines of force, here's the temporary table of content:

Introduction : 4

Part 1 : comets and mass extinction 13
Mass extinctions 14
Causes of mass extinction 16
The 27 million year cometary cycle 22
Other cometary induced mass extinctions 32

Part II : Life explosion 36
Saltarism vs Darwinism 37
Peculiar life forms around cometary impacts 39
The K/T boundary 43
The cambrian life explosion 45
Other life explosion 46
Beyond the mechanical action of cometary event 49

Part III: Viruses are the drivers of life 54
Anteriority of viruses 55
Pervasiveness of virus 57
Beneficial viruses 58

Part IV: Viruses and meteorites 62
Comet and plagues, an historical perspective 63
Meteorites carrying micro organism 65
Upper atmosphere microorganism 70
Electro Magnetic pulses 72

Part V: The information Field 77
Information theory & consciousness 78
The Field 84
Collective resonance 94

Part VI: Information field, viruses and protein 99
DNA as antennas 100
Proteins as tuners 102
DNA and proteins connect us to the Information Field 106
Fractals 108
From geometric shape to electromagnetic signature 112
The interesting case of homeopathy 116

Part VII: 6th extinction and coronavirus 120
The ongoing 6th extinction 121
Authorities and Life 123
Authorities and Control 126
Dumbing Down the Population 128
The Mind-Altering Virus 130
Man-Made Viruses 131
Man-Made SARS-CoV-2 132
Engineered for What Purpose? 135
Fort Detrick And Viruses 137
Fort Detrick and Mind Control 140
Made in China or Made in the USA? 142
From an Obedience Vaccine to a Mutated Disobedience Virus? 146
Covid vaccine 152
Conclusion 157

As you can see, Part I et II deal with mass extinctions and the subsequent evolutionary leaps. It shows that cometary events are the main cause of mass extinctions and that, soon after, more complex life forms seems to appear out of nowhere.

Part III and IV show that new viruses introduced by cometary events participate to remove obsolete life-forms and introduce the genetic material code enabling the evolutionary leap of the "spared" life forms.

Part V and VI show how the virus-enhanced DNA of life forms and the proteins coded by this DNA act as receivers tuned onto the information field. The properties of a substance are not defined by its composition but its geometry. The connection between proteins/DNA and the information field are geometric and electromagnetic. The fractal nature of DNA, viruses, proteins and the background ELF electromagnetic field reinforces the connection between life forms and any given "area" of the information field.

Part VII address the coronavirus story, an unstable Fort Detrick obedience virus that mutated in a disobedience virus (SARS-COV-2) for which obedience RNA vaccines had to be imposed. The weakening of the population immune system through fear, stress, no herd immunity and the deleterious RNA vaccines makes us highly vulnerable to a real epidemics (a new virus from space and/or a recombination between RNA vaccine sequences and viruses like the Black Death already contained in our DNA). From this perspective the 6th extinction might very well be man-made but not for the usually invoked reason: global warming. However, like during the preceding mass extinctions, the new viruses that remove obsolete life-forms might provide the genetic material for the survivors to experience an evolutionary leap.
Is it recommended to read the first book prior to this?
I love that you are addressing that viruses are an essential part of life and fundamental to our existence. Will you cover the working relationship between viruses and the innate immune system?
You mention some of the causes of the weakening of our immune system. Could you cover them all? Eg air pollution including glyphosates and pesticides in agriculture, aluminium plus other in chem trails from weather re-engineering, the fracking industry which releases cyanide into the atmosphere, radiation including emf’s wifi etc, all pharmaceutical products that are not natural and vaccines which have included mercury and aluminium plus a whole lot of crap not meant for the human body.
It would be great if this were a wake up call that the only health care we need is to build a robust immune system.
Someone somewhere must be measuring the air pollution levels but it needs to be a topic for discussion.
Thanks for the great work. I look forward to reading it.
 

Pierre

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
You mention some of the causes of the weakening of our immune system. Could you cover them all?
Probably not all, there are so many! But there will probably be a chapter dedicated to EM pollution and how it interacts with DNA.

Is it recommended to read the first book prior to this?
Yes it is better to read the first book (Earth Changes and the Human-Cosmic Connection) because it introduces concepts like dynastic cycle, information field, electromagnetism that are used in this third book.
It is also better to read the second book (Cometary Encounters) because it introduces ideas like the correlation between cometary events, mass volcanism, earthquakes that are also used in this third book.
 

Eboard10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
As I was doing my news round today I came across this article that reminded me of the thesis of your book Pierre.

Extinction at the end-Cretaceous and the origin of modern Neotropical rainforests

Another paper just came out showing how plants underwent two major diversification phases in dramatic bursts, 250 million years apart. The first major change happened in the early Devonian between 420 and 360 million years ago with the development of seeds and the second more dramatic change happened in the late Cretaceous where plants developed flowers.

Plants evolved complexity in two bursts—with a 250-million-year hiatus

A Stanford-led study reveals that rather than evolving gradually over hundreds of millions of years, land plants underwent major diversification in two dramatic bursts, 250 million years apart. The first occurred early in plant history, giving rise to the development of seeds, and the second took place during the diversification of flowering plants.

The research uses a novel but simple metric to classify plant complexity based on the arrangement and number of basic parts in their reproductive structures. While scientists have long assumed that plants became more complex with the advent of seeds and flowers, the new findings, published Sept. 17 in Science, offer insight to the timing and magnitude of those changes.

"The most surprising thing is this kind of stasis, this plateau in complexity after the initial evolution of seeds and then the total change that happened when flowering plants started diversifying," said lead study author Andrew Leslie, an assistant professor of geological sciences at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth). "The reproductive structures look different in all these plants, but they all have about the same number of parts during that stasis."

An unusual comparison

Flowers are more diverse than every other group of plants, producing colors, smells and shapes that nourish animals and delight the senses. They are also intricate: petals, anthers and pistils interweave in precise arrangements to lure pollinators and trick them into spreading pollen from one flower to another.

This complexity makes it difficult for scientists to compare flowering plants to plants with simpler reproductivesystems, such as ferns or some conifers. As a result, botanists have long focused on characteristics within family groups and typically study evolution in non-flowering plants separately from their more intricate flowering relatives.

Leslie and his co-authors overcame these differences by designing a system that classifies the number of different kinds of parts in reproductive structures based on observation alone. Each species was scored according to how many types of parts it has and the degree to which it exhibited clustering of those parts. They categorized about 1,300 land plant species from about 420 million years ago until the present.

"This tells a pretty simple story about plant reproductive evolution in terms of form and function: The more functions the plants have and the more specific they are, the more parts they have," Leslie said. "It's a useful way of thinking about broad-scale changes encompassing the whole of plant history."

From shrubs to blooms

When land plants first diversified in the early Devonian about 420 million to 360 million years ago, Earth was a warmer world devoid of trees or terrestrial vertebrate animals. Arachnids like scorpions and mites roamed the land amongst short, patchy plants and the tallest land organism was a 20-foot fungus resembling a tree trunk. After the Devonian, huge changes occurred in the animal kingdom: Land animals evolved to have large body sizes and more varied diets, insects diversified, dinosaurs appeared—but plants didn't see a major change in reproductive complexity until they developed flowers.

"Insect pollination and animal seed dispersal may have appeared as early as 300 million years ago, but it's not until the last 100 million years that these really intricate interactions with pollinators are driving this super high complexity in flowering plants," Leslie said. "There was such a long period of time where plants could have interacted with insects in the way that flowering plants do now, but they didn't to the same degree of intricacy."

In the Late Cretaceous, about 100 to 66 million years ago
, Earth more closely resembled the planet we know today—a bit like Yosemite National Park without the flowering trees and bushes. The second burst of complexity was more dramatic than the first, emphasizing the unique nature of flowering plants, according to Leslie. That period gave rise to plants like the passionflower, which can have 20 different types of parts, more than twice the number found in non-flowering plants.

The researchers classified 472 living species, part of which Leslie carried out on and around Stanford's campus by simply pulling apart local plants and counting their reproductive organs. The analysis includes vascular land plants—everything except mosses and a few early plants that lack supportive tissue for conducting water and minerals.

"One thing we argue in this paper is that this classification simply reflects their functional diversity," Leslie said. "They basically split up their labor in order to be more efficient at doing what they needed to do."
 
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