Ongoing Events in China

Tigersoap said:
Do you want everyone to feel as scared as you are from the economic expension of China and future land grab which might never happen at all ?
It's not a question of being scared, it's a question of raising awareness of a certain issue. As for things that might never happen at all, well almost everything can fall into this category. However regarding the topic of this thread, there's no harm in saying - "hey, let's consider this for a moment."

Tigersoap said:
Well I think they already planned it and are waiting for it grinning, which makes me wonder if you ever read the articles posted on the Sott ? No offence but that's the impression I get from your posts sometimes.
No offense taken certainly, I'm aware of some of the theories of 4D STS hyperdimensional beings feeding off our negative emotions, their plans for refashioning this world, their human PTB counterparts etc....However maybe I'm not married to these theories as some are, perhaps I am still chewing it over. In any case, thinking a disaster is imminent and that we are all under attack by malicious beings that mean us harm are by no means new themes. Whatever the reality is, we all need to carry on and live our lives and try to improve ourselves, and see the world we live in as clearly as possible.

I don't take issue with the theories and world views proposed by SOTT, because for the most part they have some connection to reality. The degree to which each person will "buy into" these theories will of course be different for each individual. I do take issue however with someone saying, "Hey, let's not even discuss this or that issue because it doesn't matter anyway, meteors are going to kill 94% of us anyway."
 

anart

A Disturbance in the Force
Telperion said:
I don't take issue with the theories and world views proposed by SOTT,
Just to clarify, SoTT is a news site - it doesn't necessarily propose theories - it gathers news articles from all over the world in an attempt to track what is really going on on this planet. Perhaps you're confusing SotT with the cassiopaean pages?

If you are interested in "seeing the world in which you live as clearly as possible" then - again - perhaps more time reading and less time posting your opinions on things would be beneficial.

Telperion said:
The degree to which each person will "buy into" these theories will of course be different for each individual. I do take issue however with someone saying, "Hey, let's not even discuss this or that issue because it doesn't matter anyway, meteors are going to kill 94% of us anyway."
Unfortunately, your 'taking issue' with this has no affect whatsoever on the outcome or the reality of the situation. There is no problem with discussing certain aspects of life on this planet - but focusing on what your deck chair on the Titanic looks like or whether the people on one side of the ship want what people on the other side of the ship have is really rather a waste of time, considering the whole ship is going down - and make no mistake that the whole ship IS going down.

Now, if you'd like to discuss ways to, perhaps, steer the ship out of danger, or ways to create your own little life boat, then that makes a bit more sense, even though that would likely be futile as well.

In short - the truth of objective reality cares not whether you 'take issue' with it or not - it simply is. It is the aim of this forum to see the Universe as it sees itself - not to imagine how it might be different and pontificate about the millions of little aspects of subjectivity that may or may not affect something that may or may not even exist in ten years. fwiw
 
anart said:
Unfortunately, your 'taking issue' with this has no affect whatsoever on the outcome or the reality of the situation. There is no problem with discussing certain aspects of life on this planet - but focusing on what your deck chair on the Titanic looks like or whether the people on one side of the ship want what people on the other side of the ship have is really rather a waste of time, considering the whole ship is going down - and make no mistake that the whole ship IS going down.
I find this Titanic analogy extremely interesting and relevant considering the fact that the only people to survive that disaster were those who managed to make it up to the deck, while those sleeping/trapped below in the hold/lower class cabins had no chance whatsoever. Part of my concern, taking it for granted that we are on a sinking ship, is to get as many people from down below up above where at least they will have some chance at survival. Also, while on this sinking ship, who knows how long it will take to sink? - in the meantime there will certainly be conflicts over who gets control of the lifeboats. From my point of view, while most people in the West are on one part of the ship absorbed in watching a cock fight of sorts that is the Middle East conflict, China is quietly lining it's ducks in a row. What does it mean? Will it lead to future conflict? I'm not sure.

ScioAgapeOmnis said:
Also, there is a possibility that people might carry what they learn with them beyond this life, and the possibility that "the Wave" is real and so people might be able to be positively affected by it if they had the right knowledge, even after death, who knows. Not to mention, if you're at a point where seeking and spreading knowledge is "in you to do", then really, you'd be doing what's in you to do because that's all you can do.
I agree, but unfortunately there are many people these days who are too concerned with getting a little bread into their mouths or with avoiding rape and murder to have any awareness of esoteric concerns. I would like to believe this situation can be changed, and that those for whom little to no thought at all is spared can be brought along and given the same opportunities for personal and spiritual development as everyone else.
 

domi

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
A very sobering article about China's push to (literally) increase its sphere of influence in Africa (aka the future New China)

_http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1036105/How-Chinas-taking-Africa-West-VERY-worried.html

On June 5, 1873, in a letter to The Times, Sir Francis Galton, the cousin of Charles Darwin and a distinguished African explorer in his own right, outlined a daring (if by today's standards utterly offensive) new method to 'tame' and colonise what was then known as the Dark Continent.

'My proposal is to make the encouragement of Chinese settlements of Africa a part of our national policy, in the belief that the Chinese immigrants would not only maintain their position, but that they would multiply and their descendants supplant the inferior Negro race,' wrote Galton.

'I should expect that the African seaboard, now sparsely occupied by lazy, palavering savages, might in a few years be tenanted by industrious, order-loving Chinese, living either as a semidetached dependency of China, or else in perfect freedom under their own law.'


Despite an outcry in Parliament and heated debate in the august salons of the Royal Geographic Society, Galton insisted that 'the history of the world tells the tale of the continual displacement of populations, each by a worthier successor, and humanity gains thereby'.

A controversial figure, Galton was also the pioneer of eugenics, the theory that was used by Hitler to try to fulfil his mad dreams of a German Master Race.

Eventually, Galton's grand resettlement plans fizzled out because there were much more exciting things going on in Africa.

But that was more than 100 years ago, and with legendary explorers such as Livingstone, Speke and Burton still battling to find the source of the Nile - and new discoveries of exotic species of birds and animals featuring regularly on newspaper front pages - vast swathes of the continent had not even been 'discovered'.

Yet Sir Francis Galton, it now appears, was ahead of his time. His vision is coming true - if not in the way he imagined. An astonishing invasion of Africa is now under way.

In the greatest movement of people the world has ever seen, China is secretly working to turn the entire continent into a new colony.

Reminiscent of the West's imperial push in the 18th and 19th centuries - but on a much more dramatic, determined scale - China's rulers believe Africa can become a 'satellite' state, solving its own problems of over-population and shortage of natural resources at a stroke.

With little fanfare, a staggering 750,000 Chinese have settled in Africa over the past decade. More are on the way.

The strategy has been carefully devised by officials in Beijing, where one expert has estimated that China will eventually need to send 300 million people to Africa to solve the problems of over-population and pollution.

The plans appear on track. Across Africa, the red flag of China is flying. Lucrative deals are being struck to buy its commodities - oil, platinum, gold and minerals. New embassies and air routes are opening up. The continent's new Chinese elite can be seen everywhere, shopping at their own expensive boutiques, driving Mercedes and BMW limousines, sending their children to exclusive private schools.

The pot-holed roads are cluttered with Chinese buses, taking people to markets filled with cheap Chinese goods. More than a thousand miles of new Chinese railroads are crisscrossing the continent, carrying billions of tons of illegally-logged timber, diamonds and gold.


New horizons? Mugabe has said: 'We must turn from the West and face the East'

The trains are linked to ports dotted around the coast, waiting to carry the goods back to Beijing after unloading cargoes of cheap toys made in China.

Confucius Institutes (state-funded Chinese 'cultural centres') have sprung up throughout Africa, as far afield as the tiny land-locked countries of Burundi and Rwanda, teaching baffled local people how to do business in Mandarin and Cantonese.

Massive dams are being built, flooding nature reserves. The land is scarred with giant Chinese mines, with 'slave' labourers paid less than £1 a day to extract ore and minerals.

Pristine forests are being destroyed, with China taking up to 70 per cent of all timber from Africa.

All over this great continent, the Chinese presence is swelling into a flood. Angola has its own 'Chinatown', as do great African cities such as Dar es Salaam and Nairobi.

Exclusive, gated compounds, serving only Chinese food, and where no blacks are allowed, are being built all over the continent. 'African cloths' sold in markets on the continent are now almost always imported, bearing the legend: 'Made in China'.

From Nigeria in the north, to Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Angola in the west, across Chad and Sudan in the east, and south through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique, China has seized a vice-like grip on a continent which officials have decided is crucial to the superpower's long-term survival.

'The Chinese are all over the place,' says Trevor Ncube, a prominent African businessman with publishing interests around the continent. 'If the British were our masters yesterday, the Chinese have taken their place.'

Likened to one race deciding to adopt a new home on another planet, Beijing has launched its so-called 'One China In Africa' policy because of crippling pressure on its own natural resources in a country where the population has almost trebled from 500 million to 1.3 billion in 50 years.

China is hungry - for land, food and energy. While accounting for a fifth of the world's population, its oil consumption has risen 35-fold in the past decade and Africa is now providing a third of it; imports of steel, copper and aluminium have also shot up, with Beijing devouring 80 per cent of world supplies.

Fuelling its own boom at home, China is also desperate for new markets to sell goods. And Africa, with non-existent health and safety rules to protect against shoddy and dangerous goods, is the perfect destination.

The result of China's demand for raw materials and its sales of products to Africa is that turnover in trade between Africa and China has risen from £5million annually a decade ago to £6billion today.

However, there is a lethal price to pay. There is a sinister aspect to this invasion. Chinese-made war planes roar through the African sky, bombing opponents. Chinese-made assault rifles and grenades are being used to fuel countless murderous civil wars, often over the materials the Chinese are desperate to buy.

Take, for example, Zimbabwe. Recently, a giant container ship from China was due to deliver its cargo of three million rounds of AK-47 ammunition, 3,000 rocket-propelled grenades and 1,500 mortars to President Robert Mugabe's regime.

After an international outcry, the vessel, the An Yue Jiang, was forced to return to China, despite Beijing's insistence that the arms consignment was a 'normal commercial deal'.

Indeed, the 77-ton arms shipment would have been small beer - a fraction of China's help to Mugabe. He already has high-tech, Chinese-built helicopter gunships and fighter jets to use against his people.

Ever since the U.S. and Britain imposed sanctions in 2003, Mugabe has courted the Chinese, offering mining concessions for arms and currency.

While flying regularly to Beijing as a high-ranking guest, the 84-year-old dictator rants at 'small dots' such as Britain and America.

He can afford to. Mugabe is orchestrating his campaign of terror from a 25-bedroom, pagoda-style mansion built by the Chinese. Much of his estimated £1billion fortune is believed to have been siphoned off from Chinese 'loans'.

The imposing grey building of ZANU-PF, his ruling party, was paid for and built by the Chinese. Mugabe received £200 million last year alone from China, enabling him to buy loyalty from the army.

In another disturbing illustration of the warm relations between China and the ageing dictator, a platoon of the China People's Liberation Army has been out on the streets of Mutare, a city near the border with Mozambique, which voted against the president in the recent, disputed election.

Almost 30 years ago, Britain pulled out of Zimbabwe - as it had done already out of the rest of Africa, in the wake of Harold Macmillan's 'wind of change' speech. Today, Mugabe says: 'We have turned East, where the sun rises, and given our backs to the West, where the sun sets.'

Despite Britain's commendable colonial legacy of a network of roads, railways and schools, the British are now being shunned.

According to one veteran diplomat: 'China is easier to do business with because it doesn't care about human rights in Africa - just as it doesn't care about them in its own country. All the Chinese care about is money.'

Nowhere is that more true than Sudan. Branded 'Africa's Killing Fields', the massive oil-rich East African state is in the throes of the genocide and slaughter of hundreds of thousands of black, non-Arab peasants in southern Sudan.

In effect, through its supplies of arms and support, China has been accused of underwriting a humanitarian scandal. The atrocities in Sudan have been described by the U.S. as 'the worst human rights crisis in the world today'.


Mugabe has received hundreds of millions of pounds from Chinese sources

The government in Khartoum has helped the feared Janjaweed militia to rape, murder and burn to death more than 350,000 people.

The Chinese - who now buy half of all Sudan's oil - have happily provided armoured vehicles, aircraft and millions of bullets and grenades in return for lucrative deals. Indeed, an estimated £1billion of Chinese cash has been spent on weapons.

According to Human Rights First, a leading human rights advocacy organisation, Chinese-made AK-47 assault rifles, grenade launchers and ammunition for rifles and heavy machine guns are continuing to flow into Darfur, which is dotted with giant refugee camps, each containing hundreds of thousands of people.

Between 2003 and 2006, China sold Sudan $55 million worth of small arms, flouting a United Nations weapons embargo.

With new warnings that the cycle of killing is intensifying, an estimated two thirds of the non-Arab population has lost at least one member of their families in Darfur.

Although two million people have been uprooted from their homes in the conflict, China has repeatedly thwarted United Nations denunciations of the Sudanese regime.

While the Sudanese slaughter has attracted worldwide condemnation, prompting Hollywood film-maker Steven Spielberg to quit as artistic director of the Beijing Olympics, few parts of Africa are now untouched by China.

In Congo, more than £2billion has been 'loaned' to the government. In Angola, £3 billion has been paid in exchange for oil. In Nigeria, more than £5billion has been handed over.

In Equatorial Guinea, where the president publicly hung his predecessor from a cage suspended in a theatre before having him shot, Chinese firms are helping the dictator build an entirely new capital, full of gleaming skyscrapers and, of course, Chinese restaurants.

After battling for years against the white colonial powers of Britain, France, Belgium and Germany, post-independence African leaders are happy to do business with China for a straightforward reason: cash.

With western loans linked to an insistence on democratic reforms and the need for 'transparency' in using the money (diplomatic language for rules to ensure dictators do not pocket millions), the Chinese have proved much more relaxed about what their billions are used for.

Certainly, little of it reaches the continent's impoverished 800 million people. Much of it goes straight into the pockets of dictators. In Africa, corruption is a multi-billion pound industry and many experts believe that China is fuelling the cancer.

The Chinese are contemptuous of such criticism. To them, Africa is about pragmatism, not human rights. 'Business is business,' says Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister Zhou Wenzhong, adding that Beijing should not interfere in 'internal' affairs. 'We try to separate politics from business.'

While the bounty has, not surprisingly, been welcomed by African dictators, the people of Africa are less impressed. At a market in Zimbabwe recently, where Chinese goods were on sale at nearly every stall, one woman told me she would not waste her money on 'Zing-Zong' products.

'They go Zing when they work, and then they quickly go Zong and break,' she said. 'They are a waste of money. But there's nothing else. China is the only country that will do business with us.'

There have also been riots in Zambia, Angola and Congo over the flood of Chinese immigrant workers. The Chinese do not use African labour where possible, saying black Africans are lazy and unskilled.

In Angola, the government has agreed that 70 per cent of tendered public works must go to Chinese firms, most of which do not employ Angolans.

As well as enticing hundreds of thousands to settle in Africa, they have even shipped Chinese prisoners to produce the goods cheaply.

In Kenya, for example, only ten textile factories are still producing, compared with 200 factories five years ago, as China undercuts locals in the production of 'African' souvenirs.

Where will it all end? As far as Beijing is concerned, it will stop only when Africa no longer has any minerals or oil to be extracted from the continent.

A century after Sir Francis Galton outlined his vision for Africa, the Chinese are here to stay. More will come.

The people of this bewitching, beautiful continent, where humankind first emerged from the Great Rift Valley, desperately need progress. The Chinese are not here for that.

They are here for plunder. After centuries of pain and war, Africa deserves better.
 

anart

A Disturbance in the Force
Hi domivr, this thread discusses aspects of this situation as well - http://www.cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=8351
 

go2

Dagobah Resident
domiver said:
A very sobering article about China's push to (literally) increase its sphere of influence in Africa (aka the future New China)
This article seems designed to provoke fear of China and the loss of influence
by the angle-american imperial financial interests. They expect China to provide
goods and services for USD. When they wish to exchange these for raw materials and influence, the anglo-american imperial interests begin to shout about the invasion of the Chinese. 750,000 Chinese in Africa is hardly worth mentioning, considering the size of Africa. This article is disinformation designed to distract from the real military adventures of the anglo-americans in Southwest Asia and Africa. I have included a link further examining the conflicting interests and methods of the anglo-americans and the chinese in gaining access to Africa's natural resources. China has a right to do business in Africa, and they certainly can't do much worse for that suffering continent than the British and American predators have done. What is your concern, domnivr?

_http://www.engdahl.oilgeopolitics.net/Geopolitics___Eurasia/Oil_in_Africa/oil_in_africa.html
 

domi

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
go2 said:
This article seems designed to provoke fear of China and the loss of influence
by the angle-american imperial financial interests.
I agree with you that the Chinese are painted very negatively in this article and yes, it did put that hook in me.

go2 said:
They expect China to provide
goods and services for USD. When they wish to exchange these for raw materials and influence, the anglo-american imperial interests begin to shout about the invasion of the Chinese.
That's what it seems like, but at a higher level isn't there really one player.

go2 said:
750,000 Chinese in Africa is hardly worth mentioning, considering the size of Africa.
Maybe so, but look at what happened to Tibet and how the people were displaced there.

go2 said:
This article is disinformation designed to distract from the real military adventures of the anglo-americans in Southwest Asia and Africa. I have included a link further examining the conflicting interests and methods of the anglo-americans and the chinese in gaining access to Africa's natural resources.
I appreciate the link you provided.

go2 said:
China has a right to do business in Africa, and they certainly can't do much worse for that suffering continent than the British and American predators have done.
If the chinese don't use local workers then that seems worse to me in the long run.

go2 said:
What is your concern, domnivr?
Further destruction of nature, deeper poverty for Africans, exploitation of the native peoples.
The suffering of the African people - especially equatorial - touches me personally. It is entirely possible that it has skewed my critical thinking with respect to this article.


You posting seems rather defensive with respect to China or so I think anyway.

Dominique
 

domi

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Telperion said:
As for meteor bombardments I think it bears remembering that 65 - 70% of the earth's surface is covered by oceans...but if a meteor(s) did strike land and wreak havoc,<snipped>
Hi Telperion,

Sorry to go further off topic (China-Africa) but I do want to point out that you're giving yourself a false sense of security with that statement because of the following:

- you're forgetting about comets and comet fragments: In "New Light on the Black Death" Mike Baillie talks about how the core of comets is essentially a tar ball and virtually undetectable visually. And then there's the chemical nature of comets that interacts with the atmosphere.
- no impact is needed in ocean or on land: comets or meteors can explode in the atmosphere dispersing their energy and influence over a vast area.

The book I reference above is a good resource on this topic and so are the articles Laura has written on the subject.

Dominique
 

ScioAgapeOmnis

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I think you guys are also missing that an impact in the sea probably means a tsunami on land. So no matter where it hits, if it was big enough to do damage on land, it is probably big enough to do damage to land by hitting the ocean.
 

Erna

The Living Force
Africans are treated as badly (if not worse) by their own kind as they have been treated by any other kind in history. State sanctioned violence against opposition movements is the norm. Dictators are the norm. Genocide and killing fields due to ethnic differences are the norm. The Chinese haven't experience the hatred of the African, yet. Once the masses decide no more, (and this might take decades) they'll start sabotaging anything Chinese. They'll set Chinese buildings and houses on fire, they'll kill any Chinese person they see, the way they did with the whites in Kenya, the Portuguese in Mozambique and the white farmers in Zimbabwe. Just give it time.

The trigger will be any visible Chinese prosperity on African soil.
 

Erna

The Living Force
Something that might help you understand one of the reasons why Africa is in the state that it's in, is understanding the psyche of the black man a little better. They possess a characteristic that is completely in opposition to the way the capitalistic, Caucasian mind works. As a black African, you are not allowed to be a 'have' amongst 'have nots'. As soon as you start showing prosperity, you are immediately a target. Either everyone prospers or no-one prospers.

They confide in us and tell us these things. When I first heard it I thought it was ridiculous. Now I have stopped trying to understand it and I just know that it is so. They tell us that they build their shacks in the townships with corrugated iron on purpose, because if you have a brick shack amongst corrugated iron shacks the others burn it down.

If some of them try to plant crops on farms that was given to them, the others burn it down. There were some black farmers in Zimbabwe who tried to plant crops after the white farmers have left. They quickly learned their lesson. My one friend does black adoptions for Norway and Sweden, and then they do skills development for the black mothers who have given their kids up for adoption afterwards. The one black lady, Doris, worked herself to a standstill for a year and managed to save R7000, and then she built a brick house for her family with 4 bedrooms in her village in Venda. She had the best house in the village, and this month it was burned down.

We have managed to raise the money for her again, but we know she can't try it again. Capitalism and ostentation does not flow through their veins. There's a book that's been punned very heavily in South African bookstores at the moment, Capitalist -homie-. I haven't read it yet, but I'm told it addresses this very issue.

And that is why, when the Chinese start showing prosperity on African soil, without uplifting the entire community, their days are numbered.
 

go2

Dagobah Resident
domivr said:
That's what it seems like, but at a higher level isn't there really one player.
A "divide and conquer" strategy is the age
old method of imperial control of colonized peoples. The
article trades on this tactic. That fact would point to higher level manipulation, perhaps one source, but it could be two or more sources conspiring to achieve a single objective, the enslavement of mankind.
domivr said:
Maybe so, but look at what happened to Tibet and how the people were displaced there.
If there is one player, why single out China? Why not mention Iraq or Palestine?
domivr said:
If the Chinese don't use local workers then that seems worse to me in the long run.
Worse than what?
domivr said:
Further destruction of nature, deeper poverty for Africans, exploitation of the native peoples.
The suffering of the African people - especially equatorial - touches me personally. It is entirely possible that it has skewed my critical thinking with respect to this article.
How does the suffering of Africans touch you personally?
Does it touch you more than the suffering of any other human being?
domivr said:
You posting seems rather defensive with respect to China or so I think anyway.
The anglo-american imperial predation of mankind effects me personally, on a daily basis. However, I accept your point, that I maybe identifying with China as a contrarion impulse. I want to clarify my thought, inside and out, I am opposed to imperial predation, and do not wish to identify with or defend such. My enemies enemy is not necessarily my friend, unless I want to play "divide and conquer", which I don't.
 

domi

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
go2 said:
domivr said:
Maybe so, but look at what happened to Tibet and how the people were displaced there.
If there is one player, why single out China?
Point taken.
I mentioned Tibet because it is a good example where the original peoples are displaced by colonization and birth program, so even though 750k chinese in Africa may not be that much, they have the ability to displace local peoples if they so desire.

go2 said:
Why not mention Iraq or Palestine?
We were discussing the African continent and the expansionist plans of China and now also the other players as well.

go2 said:
domivr said:
If the Chinese don't use local workers then that seems worse to me in the long run.
Worse than what?
Worse than using local workers. People desire jobs, however bad or underpaid they may be. By not giving jobs to the locals it will further disintegrate the local social and economic fabric.

go2 said:
domivr said:
Further destruction of nature, deeper poverty for Africans, exploitation of the native peoples.
The suffering of the African people - especially equatorial - touches me personally. It is entirely possible that it has skewed my critical thinking with respect to this article.
How does the suffering of Africans touch you personally?
My country is a former colonial power and its riches can be directly linked to the exploitation of its former colonies and that is something that benefited me and my countrymen. This same country allowed the slaughter in Rwanda and Burundi to happen without much interference.
Africans are also a significant immigrant population component in my country.

On a more personal level, I have one family member and one dear friend directly involved with asylum seekers (a large contingent being african) albeit in different and somewhat opposing roles.


go2 said:
Does it touch you more than the suffering of any other human being?
No, just more personal because of extra emotional baggage and connections.

go2 said:
domivr said:
You posting seems rather defensive with respect to China or so I think anyway.
The anglo-american imperial predation of mankind effects me personally, on a daily basis.
I am sorry to hear that.
 

go2

Dagobah Resident
domivr said:
My country is a former colonial power and its riches can be directly linked to the exploitation of its former colonies and that is something that benefited me and my countrymen. This same country allowed the slaughter in Rwanda and Burundi to happen without much interference.
I read "We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed with Our Families: Stories from Rwanda" by Philip Gourevitch a few years ago and was horrified at the methodical murder of families by their neighbors. The imperial west sanitizes the slaughter of millions by censorship and disinformation. Perhaps Sir Francis Galton's Chinese solution is the norm of history. This is the "terror of the situation".
domivr said:
I am sorry to hear that.
No need to feel sorry, life in these times seems characterized by slavery,
violence, and pretty words. It gives us a chance to wake up, if we choose.
Here is another link on the plunge of Africa into barbarism.
_http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=9608
erna said:
Something that might help you understand one of the reasons why Africa is in the state that it's in, is understanding the psyche of the black man a little better. They possess a characteristic that is completely in opposition to the way the capitalistic, Caucasian mind works. As a black African, you are not allowed to be a 'have' amongst 'have nots'.
The destruction of tribal societies over the last three millenia of so called civilization has left a legacy of hatred, despair, and nihilism. The black African
tribal concept of community perceives individualism an existential threat to its
reality. The tribal circle is replaced by the pyramid of civilization. How does humanity regain its humanity? I have read some of your posts on daily life in South Africa. They remind me of John Coetzee's novel Disgrace. Both seem to despair of any hope for Africa. I see you only report rather than try to understand. I think this is the only way to understand the "horror of the situation".
 

Erna

The Living Force
go2 said:
The black African
tribal concept of community perceives individualism an existential threat to its
reality.
This may certainly be true in some of the cases. Speaking of them or treating them collectively is another mistake you tend to make. One African is as different from another, as I am from you. The same way you get psychopaths and people of conscience amongst whites, Asians, Indians etc, the same way you get it amongst Africans.

Diagnosing psychopathic behaviour as anything other than psychopathic behaviour infuriates me. If a white man sets another white man alight in a Western country amongst a cheering crowd, he's called a monster. If a black man does it in Africa, their complex historical struggle is discussed.

I want prosperity for them as much as you do, and the Chinese involvement worries me equally.

go2 said:
No need to feel sorry, life in these times seems characterized by slavery,
violence, and pretty words.
I notice that you, too, use pretty words for plain and simple criminal and barbaric behaviour.
 
Top Bottom