Saturated Fats, Cholesterol Lard and Vitamin D

Mal7

Dagobah Resident
This May 2014 paper looks like a good overview of recent research. The full paper is at the link below.

"Should animal fats be back on the table? A critical review of the human health effects of animal fat"

by William Barendse

_http://www.publish.csiro.au/view/journals/dsp_journal_fulltext.cfm?nid=72&f=AN13536
 

ka

Padawan Learner
Improving palatability of beef fat
My source for good meat and marrow bones is a butcher that specializes in high quality beef.

Pork products and lard of comparable quality are not conveniently available I live.

I really enjoy the good bone broth I can make from the beef bones I get there, but I was disappointed that the aroma of the cooking-down process was kinda funky: not all that appetizing. The large amount of beef fat that comes with the marrow is less good to eat than good pork lard.

But I discovered a magical way to make the beef fat almost as good as lard!

I’d read that one thing vitamin E does is to chemically “fix” lipids in your body that have oxidized (gone rancid), which prevents them from messing with your metabolism. And I seem to remember reading that one great thing about coconut oil is that it does the same thing.

So, I tried adding a dollop of coconut oil to the hot beef fat I skimmed off my beef broth. After the beef/coconut fat had been in the refrigerator for a day, it tasted as fresh and sweet enough to eat all by itself.

The last time I boiled down beef marrow bones, I put a dollop of coconut oil in the pot, and the cooking aroma was very much improved. It’s a quality-of-life issue for the home environment for a couple of days, after all. And the fat that’s skimmed off can be used in any way that you would use lard.

So now I have a regular supply of high-quality animal fat that’s delicious, just by adding a little coconut oil to it before it congeals.
 

A Jay

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
ka said:
Improving palatability of beef fat
My source for good meat and marrow bones is a butcher that specializes in high quality beef.

Pork products and lard of comparable quality are not conveniently available I live.

I really enjoy the good bone broth I can make from the beef bones I get there, but I was disappointed that the aroma of the cooking-down process was kinda funky: not all that appetizing. The large amount of beef fat that comes with the marrow is less good to eat than good pork lard.

But I discovered a magical way to make the beef fat almost as good as lard!

I’d read that one thing vitamin E does is to chemically “fix” lipids in your body that have oxidized (gone rancid), which prevents them from messing with your metabolism. And I seem to remember reading that one great thing about coconut oil is that it does the same thing.

So, I tried adding a dollop of coconut oil to the hot beef fat I skimmed off my beef broth. After the beef/coconut fat had been in the refrigerator for a day, it tasted as fresh and sweet enough to eat all by itself.

The last time I boiled down beef marrow bones, I put a dollop of coconut oil in the pot, and the cooking aroma was very much improved. It’s a quality-of-life issue for the home environment for a couple of days, after all. And the fat that’s skimmed off can be used in any way that you would use lard.

So now I have a regular supply of high-quality animal fat that’s delicious, just by adding a little coconut oil to it before it congeals.
That's really interesting, and haven't thought of that. Thanks for sharing! Can't wait to try it out and see how it turns out! :)
 

987baz

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've recently switched to using lard (and ghee) as I trying to figure out if I have a nut allergy (which unfortunately includes coconut). I have found it very difficult to find organic Lard here where I live, but have spoken to my organic shop and they are trying to source some for me. I think I will have to try rendering it myself.

The connection between lard and vitamin D is very serendipitous for me, as I have recently found out my vitamin D is also low.
 

itellsya

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
987baz said:
I've recently switched to using lard (and ghee) as I trying to figure out if I have a nut allergy (which unfortunately includes coconut). I have found it very difficult to find organic Lard here where I live, but have spoken to my organic shop and they are trying to source some for me. I think I will have to try rendering it myself.

The connection between lard and vitamin D is very serendipitous for me, as I have recently found out my vitamin D is also low.
FWIW, i know many of us struggle to find certified organic and pasteured lard/butter/ghee, and are making do with store bought, sadly. Thankfully my eggs are naturally raised, though these also require effort to find! And i'm surrounded by fields and farms...
I may try the Tallow and coconut combo one day though.
 

987baz

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
FWIW, i know many of us struggle to find certified organic and pasteured lard/butter/ghee, and are making do with store bought, sadly. Thankfully my eggs are naturally raised, though these also require effort to find! And i'm surrounded by fields and farms...
I may try the Tallow and coconut combo one day though.
It's so frustrating that these things are so hard to find, however, I am pretty lucky in the fact that at least I have managed to source both organic ghee and grass fed unsalted butter, even if the ghee is $20 for a 225g jar (needles to say I don't use it every day). I haven't managed to find any suet yet either, but I will keep trying.

As far as the eggs go ( I hope to try them again soon, as I've been on an elimination diet for two weeks), the laws regarding free range (uncaged) eggs have changed recently down under, which means the needs to be less area for the chickens now than there used to be. There are organic ones too, but I'm trusting labels less and less these days, would be great if i knew some farmers but that's at least a 3 or 4 hour drive :( But like you said, we make do with what we can :cool2:
 
Hi, all. I just put up my second batch of bone broth (17#s of pork leg/shoulder bones)@ .75 lb up .25 since my last visit, go figure... This time however I decided to also render leaf lard at the same time :shock: I purchased 20#s of leaf lard at the same price asked for the pork bones, (.75#).


I'm home from work at about 11:15 pm and it's Friday, so I'm geeked to get this underway.

Doing bone broth for some might seem like a large task and if it does don't even try large scale leaf lard rendering!

I finally wrapped it up at about 1:00pm Saturday. The point here? Some have posted comments on the price of rendered leaf lard shipped to them and that the price seems rather high. Remember this... melting leaf lard is not the same thing as rendering leaf lard. :shock:
 
This might help in understanding a bit more about the benefits of lard and how the mechanisms of our immune system function. I'm certainly not a wizard of smart, but I thought this article might have a couple of nuggets to mull over. :read:http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/skin-deep/
 

987baz

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
michaelrc said:
This might help in understanding a bit more about the benefits of lard and how the mechanisms of our immune system function. I'm certainly not a wizard of smart, but I thought this article might have a couple of nuggets to mull over. :read:http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/skin-deep/
thanks michaelrc, looks like an interesting article :cool2:
 

rrraven

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Yo Baz check out this mob
they should have good lard(amongst other goodies)
--http://www.spencersbrookfarm.com.au/
WELCOME TO SPENCERS BROOK FARM
YOUR LOCAL GOURMET FOOD PRODUCER.
Spencers Brook Farm specialises in breeding free-range pigs, sheep and cows on our Eastern Wheatbelt property 90km away from Perth, WA. We have NASAA certification (ID: 6216) for cereals, grains, pulses, sheep, Beef cattle, and other area codes.
Our farm is home to Berkshire and Saddleback pigs, Long-horned Wiltshire sheep, Dexter cattle, ponies, geese, and a few chooks. To ensure we are a genuine paddock to plate enterprise, two years ago we set up our own licensed butchery and now process our own meat, with the help of another local butcher to make some of our smallgoods.
We market directly to our customers within the Perth metropolitan area.
Our range includes 9 different varieties of fresh pork sausage and lamb sausages; rillettes; jambonneau; pork and liver pate - all kinds of potted pork; Bacon jam (yes you did read that right) to compliment our fresh meat cuts. Our smallgoods include nitrate and gluten free ham, bacon and chorizo and we have recently added our own in house beer cured bacon and gammon to the mix. Seasonal beef plus lamb or hogget are also available and we are developing new ideas with these too including spiced beef a traditional English cold meat product.
Our products are nitrate-free, preservative-free, and gluten-free made from our own,
 

987baz

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Yo Baz check out this mob
they should have good lard(amongst other goodies)
--http://www.spencersbrookfarm.com.au/
Awesome thanks raven, checked out the site, they have organic pig lard!!! :D
 

Trobar

Padawan Learner
Just found out this week that Vitamin D is actually not a vitamin at all - but rather a steroid hormone precursor which is fundamentally necessary for almost all functions of the body.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/08/27/vitamin-d-rickets.aspx#!
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
This study was done by four Japanese researches on Statins verses High Cholesterol. There's also two video's on the site.

Japanese Research Exposes Statin Scam: People with High Cholesterol Live Longer
http://healthimpactnews.com/2015/japanese-research-exposes-statin-scam-people-with-high-cholesterol-live-longer/

Four Japanese researchers published an analysis on cholesterol guidelines and statin drugs in the April 2015 edition of the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism.

Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, the Scottish doctor who wrote The Great Cholesterol Con recently stated on his blog that he has read the entire 116 page review:


For many years I have told anyone who will listen that, if you have a high cholesterol level, you will live longer. Equally, if you have a low cholesterol level, you will die younger. This, ladies and gentlemen, is a fact. The older you become the more beneficial it is to have a high cholesterol level.

This fact has become more difficult to demonstrate recently as so many people have been put on statins that the association between cholesterol levels and mortality has been twisted, bent and pumelled into the weirdest shapes imaginable. However, Japan, provides some very interesting data.

The entire study can be read free online here.

Here is the Introduction:

High cholesterol levels are recognized as a major cause of atherosclerosis. However, for more than half a century some have challenged this notion. But which side is correct, and why can’t we come to a definitive conclusion after all this time and with more and more scientific data available? We believe the answer is very simple: for the side defending this so-called cholesterol theory, the amount of money at stake is too much to lose the fight.

The issue of cholesterol is one of the biggest issues in medicine where the law of economy governs. Moreover, advocates of the theory take the notion to be a simple, irrefutable ‘fact’ and self-explanatory. They may well think that those who argue against the cholesterol theory—actually, the cholesterol ‘hypothesis’— are mere eccentrics.

We, as those on the side opposing the hypothesis, understand their argument very well. Indeed, the first author of this supplementary issue (TH) had been a very strong believer and advocate of the cholesterol hypothesis up until a couple of years after the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S) reported the benefits of statin therapy in The Lancet in 1994. To be honest with the readers, he used to persuade people with high cholesterol levels to take statins. He even gave a talk or two to general physicians promoting the benefits of statins. Terrible, unforgivable mistakes given what we came to know and clearly know now.

In this supplementary issue, we explore the background to the cholesterol hypothesis utilizing data obtained mainly from Japan—the country where anti-cholesterol theory campaigns can be conducted more easily than in any other countries. But why is this? Is it because the Japanese researchers defending the hypothesis receive less support from pharmaceutical companies than researchers overseas do? Not at all. Because Japanese researchers are indolent and weak? No, of course not. Because the Japanese public is skeptical about the benefits of medical therapy? No, they generally accept everything physicians say; unfortunately, this is also complicated by the fact that physicians don’t have enough time to study the cholesterol issue by themselves, leaving them simply to accept the information provided by the pharmaceutical industry.

Reading through this supplementary issue, it will become clear why Japan can be the starting point for the anti-cholesterol theory campaign. The relationship between all-cause mortality and serum cholesterol levels in Japan is a very interesting one: mortality actually goes down with higher total or low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, as reported by most Japanese epidemiological studies of the general population. This relationship cannot be observed as easily in other countries, except in elderly populations where the same relationship exists worldwide.

The mortality from coronary heart disease in Japan has accounted for around just 7% of all cause mortality for decades; a much lower rate than seen in Western countries. The theory that the lower the cholesterol levels are, the better is completely wrong in the case of Japan—in fact, the exact opposite is true. Because Japan is unique in terms of cholesterol-related phenomena, it is easy to find flaws in the cholesterol hypothesis.

Based on data from Japan, we propose a new direction in the use of cholesterol medications for global health promotion; namely, recognizing that cholesterol is a negative risk factor for all-cause mortality and re-examining our use of cholesterol medications accordingly. This, we believe, marks the starting point of a paradigm shift in not only how we understand the role cholesterol plays in health, but also how we provide cholesterol treatment.

The guidelines for cholesterol are thus another area of great importance. Indeed, the major portion of this supplementary issue (from Chapter 4 onward) is given over to our detailed examination and critique of guidelines published by the Japan Atherosclerosis Society. We dedicate a large portion of this work to these guidelines because they are generally held in high regard in Japan, and the country’s public health administration mechanism complies with them without question. Physicians, too, tend to simply obey the guidelines; their workloads often don’t allow them to explore the issue rigorously enough to learn the background truth and they are afraid of litigation if they don’t follow the guidelines in daily practice.

These chapters clearly describe some of the flaws in the guidelines—flaws which are so serious that it becomes clear that times must change and the guidelines must be updated. Our purpose in writing this supplementary issue is to help everyone understand the issue of cholesterol better than before, and we hope that we lay out the case for why a paradigm shift in cholesterol treatment is needed, and sooner rather than later. We would like to stress in closing that we have received no funding in support of writing or publishing this supplementary issue and our conflicts of interest statements are given in full at the end.

The Statin Scam: Don’t Let it Ruin Your Health!

The statin scam has been exposed, but there are powerful sources at work in the medical system to keep it going.

One of the best documentaries exposing the statin scam and interviewing doctors in the industry who have exposed it, was published in 2013 on ABC in Australia. The medical authorities were not successful in preventing it from being aired on TV, but they have removed almost all copies from YouTube now, and forced ABC to remove them from their website.

We currently are using copies by Dr. Eades posted on his Vimeo account. Take some time to watch these important documentaries produced by medical doctors on the statin drug scam, and be informed!
 
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