Saturated Fats, Cholesterol Lard and Vitamin D

Rick Rowe

Padawan Learner
anart said:
Hi Hellfire, I think the ultimate goal here will be to get off medication all together, not to find a 'better pill'. This can be accomplished through diet. Have you had a chance to read the "Life without Bread' thread in the diet and health section?
Hi Anart, I have started to read the threads in "Life without Bread", I haven't started in "Diet and Health" yet! I will start in there tomorrow. I do have the book "Life Without Bread" I am close to half way through it. It's a little complicated and it's also in an area I know so little about, but some of it making sense too me.
I am sure I will have to re-read it to get my head wrapped around what the book is actually talking about.
I am happy I have cassiopaea forum to come and get a little help with it all.

hf
 

Rick Rowe

Padawan Learner
Megan said:
HellFire said:
I am now looking into maybe using the pill called "UIBIQUINOL" I was reading some very good stuff on here with regards to how it strengthens the muscles around the heart which aids and helps increase the blood flow to the heart. It was listed to be a great suppliment either for people who were on "Staten" drugs and also for people who were not on it.
Ubiquinol is a form of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and I have often seen it recommended for people that have been taking statins, to help with healing from the heart damage that statins cause. I do not know if it would be wise to take it concurrently with a statin.

I agree with Anart that it would be better to eliminate the statin rather than replace it with a "better" one, but I don't know your current health status and wouldn't be able to interpret it if I did. The obvious path toward health (eliminate bad things; replace them with good things) doesn't always work when your health has already deteriorated and/or you have become dependent upon medications (which is exactly what "the system" is seeking). I don't want to encourage you to make changes that seem to be for the better but that actually can make things worse.

Ubiquinol, however, is a naturally occurring form of CoQ10 that, once you are off of statins, could help your heart and other organs to recover from the statin side effects.

I have some experience with statins through someone close to me. I can't go into any details without compromising that person's privacy but the bottom line is that if you educate yourself first, you can work with your doctor (or some other doctor if that one proves to be a knucklehead) to withdraw from statin "therapy." You will most likely also have to understand cholesterol and LDL/HDL/trigliceride levels, because it goes against their training to do the right thing. So start reading. :D
Hi Megan, I just received my latest blood test in I was a little high with bad cholesterol my doctor put me on "Crestor" 20mg once a day last year because my cholesterol had been high a few time and he had told me it was the "bad" LDL cholesterol I tried to lower it myself and had no luck, I also had NO idea what the battle was an or how to lower this high cholesterol. So I started to see my natural path and we were trying Niacin which I had a very bad response to after increasing it a few time and I broke out in hives all over my body.
I hope you don't mind but I will be seeing my homeopath on Tuesday and I will find out exactly, I am not knowledgeable with this whole thing and trying to learn very fast! I want to know how I can get off this drug and how I am suppose to do this in a healthy way and also how I am to change my diet so that my levels go back to something normal. Is this something I can do on my own or is this really possible? My doctor doesn't seem to think so or else he wouldn't have placed me on these pills.
Do I just stop taking these pills, and or do I ween myself off them? I started to cut them in half because I really don't want to take them, but fear kicks in and I wonder if I am doing myself harm now?
do I have to talk with my doctor first?
So many question...
I really don't know and I need to express this because I feel my back is up against a wall in this situation here with these pills and my cholesterol. I have changed my life (diet) 100% in the past couple years and nothing is lowering it and that was the only reason I went onto this drug, my mistake was I did not do the research on the drug itself! I trusted my doctor with this.

Sorry for dumping this, but I really need some answers or guidance of where I can get this information from.

whew
me.
 

mb

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
If yours is the typical situation where a doctor places you on a toxic medication that you don't need then the solution could be very simple: stop taking the drug. I don't know if a gradual reduction is called for or not, and I am in no position to evaluate any withdrawal effects that might occur, and that is why you should work with your doctor no matter what. In order to do that, you have to educate yourself about things that your doctor doesn't know.

If I am wrong about your particular situation, you are the one that is going to pay for it, and the price could potentially be high, so I really don't want to make a recommendation. If you have a question about database or query design, perhaps I can handle that. :)

If you obtain several of the better books that we have been reading and zero in on the cholesterol-related chapters first, you will learn a lot in a short time. Try asking for a short list of recommended books (that discuss cholesterol and "treating" high LDL) in the "Life Without Bread" topic. You can also link back here so as to not have to repost everything already said. The network is an essential part of the learning process -- I use this forum all the time for input in making decisions.
 

Rick Rowe

Padawan Learner
Megan said:
If yours is the typical situation where a doctor places you on a toxic medication that you don't need then the solution could be very simple: stop taking the drug. I don't know if a gradual reduction is called for or not, and I am in no position to evaluate any withdrawal effects that might occur, and that is why you should work with your doctor no matter what. In order to do that, you have to educate yourself about things that your doctor doesn't know.

If I am wrong about your particular situation, you are the one that is going to pay for it, and the price could potentially be high, so I really don't want to make a recommendation. If you have a question about database or query design, perhaps I can handle that. :)

If you obtain several of the better books that we have been reading and zero in on the cholesterol-related chapters first, you will learn a lot in a short time. Try asking for a short list of recommended books (that discuss cholesterol and "treating" high LDL) in the "Life Without Bread" topic. You can also link back here so as to not have to repost everything already said. The network is an essential part of the learning process -- I use this forum all the time for input in making decisions.
That makes perfect sense!
I will try not to make you repeat yourself as well.
Thank you. :)
 

mb

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
By the way, one of my doctors warned me about my cholesterol a couple of years ago. I responded by avoiding him like the plague. Now that I know a lot more about it, I have requested a fresh lipid panel and I am prepared to have an intelligent conversation on the subject, even if it proves to be one-sidedly so.
 

Rick Rowe

Padawan Learner
Megan said:
By the way, one of my doctors warned me about my cholesterol a couple of years ago. I responded by avoiding him like the plague. Now that I know a lot more about it, I have requested a fresh lipid panel and I am prepared to have an intelligent conversation on the subject, even if it proves to be one-sidedly so.
Hi Megan, just to give you the heads up!
I spoke with my doctor today about going of Crestor, he was a supportive yet a little upset too, he thought it would be good to go off but do some blood work in 3mnths to see what my cholesterol numbers are at that time. I checked my old cholesterol level and the highest mine went up was 6.3 and thats when I went on Crestor. I have a hunch that my HIV meds are part of the problem as well, plus my mother had cholesterol problems before her passing.
I have changed my new meds 3mnths ago to the newest in HIV meds called "Truvada" and they supposedly have non of the side effect my old drugs had, and one being cholesterol changes.

Anyhow I loved your in put and advice and I thought I would share this with you.

:)
 

mb

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thanks for the update. The more you read and learn about how the lipid panel numbers and statin prescriptions work, the better you will be able to ask questions and make your own decisions. Ideally you should be able to work with your doctor and even educate him/her at least with regard to your personal situation.

I just received my lipid panel results less than an hour ago. As I expected, my cholesterol and LDL are still somewhat high, and my triglycerides are looking quite good. The TG/HDL-C ratio is a healthy 1.3, suggesting that the LDL particle size is large, as it should be. I don't see anything to be concerned about other than having to take the time now to teach the doctor something about low-carb dieting and its effect on cholesterol levels. If I didn't know what these numbers mean, I would be worried right now -- over nothing.

My fasting glucose is a bit high, and that might be a concern. But then all those years of high carb + vegetable oil consumption have likely done a lot of damage. Oh well.
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I almost posted this in the movies thread, but its really a 2 hour lecture, by Sally Fallon, about the benefits of saturated fats and seems more appropriate in this thread. This is an excellent piece to present to friends and family who are in thrall of the decades of mind numbing propaganda touting the dietary glories of polyunsaturated vegetable oils, and the use of transfats in fast food and processed foods. It is a good and informative watch:

The Oiling of America by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon... the full video:
_http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvKdYUCUca8

Here is a good print overview for those on a low bandwidth connection:
_http://www.drcranton.com/nutrition/oiling.htm
 

domivr

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Rabelais said:
I almost posted this in the movies thread, but its really a 2 hour lecture, by Sally Fallon, about the benefits of saturated fats and seems more appropriate in this thread. This is an excellent piece to present to friends and family who are in thrall of the decades of mind numbing propaganda touting the dietary glories of polyunsaturated vegetable oils, and the use of transfats in fast food and processed foods. It is a good and informative watch:

The Oiling of America by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon... the full video:
_http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvKdYUCUca8
I'd like to give two big thumbs up for this video lecture.
I don't think I'll ever be looking at cholesterol the same way again. More proof of psychopathy in action over the span decades.
I thought the image she used of electron clouds on cells in correlation with saturated fats was great. Certainly might give an explanation why some people have a "glow" to them.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Rabelais said:
Here is a good print overview for those on a low bandwidth connection:
_http://www.drcranton.com/nutrition/oiling.htm
Oh boy, a CLEAR example of psychopaths monitoring and controlling science:

When Mary Enig, a graduate student at the University of Maryland, read the McGovern committee report, she was puzzled. Enig was familiar with Kummerow’s research and she knew that the consumption of animal fats in America was not on the increase—quite the contrary, use of animal fats had been declining steadily since the turn of the century. A report in the Journal of American Oil Chemists—which the McGovern Committee did not use—showed that animal fat consumption had declined from 104 grams per person per day in 1909 to 97 grams per day in 1972, while vegetable fat intake had increased from a mere 21 grams to almost 60.14 Total per capita fat consumption had increased over the period, but this increase was mostly due to an increase in unsaturated fats from vegetable oils—with 50 percent of the increase coming from liquid vegetable oils and about 41 percent from margarines made from vegetable oils. She noted a number of studies that directly contradicted the McGovern Committee’s conclusions that "there is . . . a strong correlation between dietary fat intake and the incidence of breast cancer and colon cancer," two of the most common cancers in America. Greece, for example, had less than one-fourth the rate of breast cancer compared to Israel but the same dietary fat intake. Spain had only one-third the breast cancer mortality of France and Italy but the total dietary fat intake was slightly greater. Puerto Rico, with a high animal fat intake, had a very low rate of breast and colon cancer. The Netherlands and Finland both used approximately 100 grams of animal fat per capita per day but breast and colon cancer rates were almost twice in the Netherlands what they are in Finland. The Netherlands consumed 53 grams of vegetable fat per person compared to 13 in Finland. A study from Cali, Columbia found a fourfold excess risk for colon cancer in the higher economic classes, which used less animal fat than the lower economic classes. A study on Seventh-Day Adventist physicians, who avoid meat, especially red meat, found they had a significantly higher rate of colon cancer than non-Seventh Day Adventist physicians. Enig analyzed the USDA data that the McGovern Committee had used and concluded that it showed a strong positive correlation with total fat and vegetable fat and an essentially strong negative correlation or no correlation with animal fat to total cancer deaths, breast and colon cancer mortality and breast and colon cancer incidence—in other words, use of vegetable oils seemed to predispose to cancer and animal fats seemed to protect against cancer. She noted that the analysts for the committee had manipulated the data in inappropriate ways in order to obtain mendacious results.

Enig’s paper sent alarm bells through the industry. In early 1979, she received a visit from S. F. Reipma of the National Association of Margarine Manufacturers. Short, bald and pompous, Reipma was visibly annoyed. He explained that both his association and the Institute for Shortening and Edible Oils (ISEO) kept careful watch to prevent articles like Enig’s from appearing in the literature. Enig’s paper should never have been published, he said. He thought that ISEO was "watching out."

"We left the barn door open," he said, "and the horse got out."


Reipma also challenged Enig’s use of the USDA data, claiming that it was in error. He knew it was in error, he said, "because we give it to them."

A few weeks later, Reipma paid a second visit, this time in the company of Thomas Applewhite, an advisor to the ISEO and representative of Kraft Foods, Ronald Simpson with Central Soya and an unnamed representative from Lever Brothers. They carried with them—in fact, waved them in the air in indignation—a two-inch stack of newspaper articles, including one that appeared in the National Enquirer, reporting on Enig’s Federation Proceedings article. Applewhite’s face flushed red with anger when Enig repeated Reipma’s statement that "they had left the barn door open and a horse got out," and his admission that Department of Agriculture food data had been sabotaged by the margarine lobby.

The other thing Reipma told Enig during his unguarded visit was that he had called in on the FASEB offices in an attempt to coerce them into publishing letters to refute her paper, without allowing Enig to submit any counter refutation as was normally customary in scientific journals. He told Enig that he was "thrown out of the office"—an admission later confirmed by one of the FASEB editors. Nevertheless, a series of letters did follow the July 1978 article.16 On behalf of the ISEO, Applewhite and Walter Meyer of Procter and Gamble criticized Enig’s use of the data; Applewhite accused Enig of extrapolating from two data points, when in fact she had used seven. In the same issue, John Bailar, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, pointed out that the correlations between vegetable oil consumption and cancer were not the same as evidence of causation and warned against changing current dietary components in the hopes of preventing cancer in the future—which is of course exactly what the McGovern Committee did.

In reply, Enig and her colleagues noted that although the NCI had provided them with faulty cancer data, this had no bearing on the statistics relating to trans consumption, and did not affect the gist of their argument—that the correlation between vegetable fat consumption, especially trans fat consumption, was sufficient to warrant a more thorough investigation. The problem was that very little investigation was being done.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Statins and Diabetes

Michael R. Eades, M.D.

In the Jan 9, 2012 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine in the Online First section an article appeared showing that women studied as part of the Women’s Health Initiative who were on statin drugs during the study developed diabetes at greater rates than those who were not on these drugs. According to the statistical analysis of the authors, being on a statin increased the relative risk of developing diabetes by 48 percent!

These were observational studies and, as such, can’t be used to determine causality. But they are interesting nonetheless because according to one of the authors there have been other clinical trials showing the same thing. One of the authors of the study, Dr. JoAnn Manson, Professor of Medicine and Harvard Medical School commented on the findings of this study and what they mean to doctors who put patients on statins. Dr. Manson’s commentary was provided by Medscape, a site for physicians to go to learn about the latest in medical wizardry. The site requires registration, but if you are interested, you are allowed to register even if you aren’t a physician.

I decided that instead of commenting on Dr. Manson’s video after the fact, I would do it in real time right on the video. This is my first effort at anything like this, so you can let me know what you think of it. If you find it enjoyable and/or helpful, please drop a note in the comments, and I may be inspired to try it again.

You’ll notice my repeated assertions that statins don’t provide any benefits. What I’m talking about is the fact that statins have never been shown to decrease all-cause mortality. (See the first sentence in the Lipitor product insert above.) In other words, if you take a statin, you gain no increase in life expectancy. If I, myself, am evaluating a drug that I might have to take, I would certainly want to make sure it didn’t simply replace one risk factor for another.

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/statins/statins-and-diabetes/
 
As I am now becoming more know ledgable in regards to diet I now see I could of steered my mother in a more healthier direction. When she was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer of tumors found in the liver, she was injected monthly with some kind of statin. It did slow the growth, but wow, her health went downhill.She could not stop the abnormal urine flows, using 6 adult diapers a day and none of the dos she went to did anything for her. I myself didn't know where to turn to help her' I bet it would of found some answers now with all the info we have here.OSIT.Its a hard one for me.I was taking care of her,albeit,ignorantly as I see it now. She craved meat and fats and I steered her away from it, being in a hypnotic daze myself. Her and I always fought over using supplements as she was resistant to any kind of pill. I can't say I blame her now. Again as I see it now, mine were good intentions. I really didn't know squat either about what I was touting as beneficial. My intentions were good. Good and ignorant. I hadn't researched and much of what I knew was hearsay by people who hadn't really researched in any real way either, no matter what label they used on themselves, professing their expertise. I myself was being poisoned with food and in turn couldn't absorb the info in any real way either! So it was the blind leading the blind. It is only recently that I began eating according to the guidelines I have found here. And finally knowing what and why, only due to the research I've read here and the ability to absorb the info more clearly. Hallelujah! Finally. My desire for change and knowledge kept me coming back and I am no longer in trance, due to what I'm ingesting. For years my Mom craved fat and meats and I adamantly tried to talk her out of it. Her body knew what it needed. When she was a child in the 30's my German grandmother packed her nose with lard after a nasty accident. It tore the lower nostril and left it bleeding profusely. The lard served to heal it without any side effects, without antibiotics. It was cleaned with either peroxide or alcohol and she had to wear this lard pack taped on her nose to school.Hated every minute of it. But it healed great with a small scar. My grandmother also used the lard when our dog got bitten badly by a larger dog. No vet for my nanny. She shoved the dogs intestines back inside, stitched it a few times and packed it with lard. She slept with that dog on the floor for days and he recovered beautifully. It makes me cry even now thinking of the love and knowledge she applied so skillfully.She may have learned these things on a goat farm she grew up in. She would of loved the knowledge we have on this site and would have lived far into her late 90's. She died willfully knowing it was the only solution rather than the limitations of a hip that could not be replaced due to her age.The pain that she hid was too much.She left the body at 92. I can hear her now, encouraging me to pay attention to you guys and be fearless about changing my life. I have and its all she ever wanted for me. To keep learning and find my truth! I use lard all the time now along with coconut oil and sesame for cooking. I have just bought a large bottle of ghee from a deli that just happens to be owned by Sri Lankans. They sell all sorts of things I need like turmeric and cumin etc. right down my street. Duck fat is a new trend that is found in restaurants serving fries so I should be able to find it easier. After all I am 20 min away from the big bad (a little sad to me) Apple.
 

Voyageur

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
A little slow watching this link mentioned above by Laura, featuring Michael R. Eades, MD discussing Statins:

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/statins/statins-and-diabetes/

Must say, in my eye anyway, that how he works with the video, pausing and commenting on this medical authoritarian (Manson) from the background, was a very effective way to critique (real time). At one point, it was akin to hitting my head against a wall to also note (8:37), how Statin advocates would like very much to add these drugs to the human water supply; if they are not already here and there.

Thanks Rabelais, i'll check this out too:

The Oiling of America by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon... the full video:
_http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvKdYUCUca8
 
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