Session 11 August 2018

Jones

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Without getting into a big essay about it, the symbols they were using were: 1) lamb, 2) anchor, 3) vase, 4) dove, 5) boat, 6) olive branch, 7) the Orante, 8) palm, 9) bread, 10) the good shepherd, 11) fish, 12) vine and grapes.
The Orante - the statue in the Gauguin? "Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?" I read what I could find on the Gauguin to try to figure out the symbolism of it and did a search on Goddesses to see if I could find that statue, but wasn't successful.
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The Orante - the statue in the Gauguin? "Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?" I read what I could find on the Gauguin to try to figure out the symbolism of it and did a search on Goddesses to see if I could find that statue, but wasn't successful.
Could it be that the word to look for is "Orans", at least it gives: Orans - Wikipedia
, a loanword from Medieval Latin ōrāns translated as one who is praying or pleading, also orant or orante, is a posture or bodily attitude of prayer, usually standing, with the elbows close to the sides of the body and with the hands outstretched sideways, palms up.[1] It was common in early Christianity and can frequently be seen in early Christian art. In modern times, the orans position is still preserved within parts of the Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican and Lutheran liturgies, Pentecostal and charismatic worship, and the ascetical practices of some religious groups.
or in the Spanish version of the Wiki, translated to English
Prayer (iconographic theme)
The praying man, the word coming from the Latin orans,1 is a topic iconography of paleo-christian art which depicts a person with outstretched hands in a gesture of prayer. This is a typical position of prayer, which is attested, for example, in some texts of the Old Testament (cf. Ex 17, 11, Lm 3, 41, Ps 118, 48, etc) The gesture is also referred to in some works of the antiquity, as a carmina where Catullus says that Calvo had no choice but to contact the gods by raising hands (Carm 53, 4-5). Also Virgil tells that Anquises would have stretched hands to the sky to pray to Zeus (In II 687; see also: In VI 314).
The picture that is used in both cases is 31304
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Behind the story of the Virgin Mary or Mother Mary some could argue there is a linking to, Venus/Aphrodite of the Roman Greek civilization On Roman Goddess Venus: Universal Divine Love there is:
The goddess Isis, may be one more value of the feminine aspect, besides Venus, that was absorbed into the figure of Mother Mary. On
Isis one finds:
It was not until Isis was worshiped in Rome that people wrote about the cult to any great degree [...] Her temple on the island of Philae in Upper Egypt would remain an active pilgrimage site for thousands of years until closed in the 6th century CE by the Christian emperor Justinian. [...]
She is depicted in some stories and inscriptions as a homeless woman, an old woman, a wife searching for and mourning her lost husband, a mother mourning a missing child, a woman fighting for her family, and all of these stories identified her with the common people of Egypt and their darkest moments; because of this, Isis became the goddess of all the people of Egypt, male and female, royal and common, alike. [...]
Eventually, she became associated with the sea and was a protectress of sailors and merchants who wore talismans honoring her and invoked her aid in times of trouble (attested to by archaeological evidence). Unlike the other gods of Egypt, Isis transcended national borders and was worshiped by the Greeks and the Romans who believed in her as the supreme deity who created the world. Her cult in Rome was the greatest rival to the young religion of Christianity, which drew upon the image of Isis and the child-god Horus for the depiction of the Madonna with the Christ child.
In this post Laura comments on the meaning of Isis according to the C's and her own research.
 
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