The Carnivore Diet

SMM

The Living Force
Mikhaila Peterson talks about using bone broth after fasts in a stream she posted on September 14th, 2019. It is easer to stomach as it's less dense. She also discusses many useful points, ideas and experiences worth noting, such as how she still had C. difficile colitis after going carnivore due to high Clostridium levels. She used a microbiome protocol she doesn't share in the video, though may have shared since, and says it'll shock people when she reveals it. Curious if it's fecal transplant?

 

anartist

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Mikhaila Peterson talks about using bone broth after fasts in a stream she posted on September 14th, 2019. It is easer to stomach as it's less dense. She also discusses many useful points, ideas and experiences worth noting, such as how she still had C. difficile colitis after going carnivore due to high Clostridium levels. She used a microbiome protocol she doesn't share in the video, though may have shared since, and says it'll shock people when she reveals it. Curious if it's fecal transplant?

I don't know what the microbiome thing is, but Mikhaila has mentioned that she has done many fecal translplants
 

jhonny

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I have been listening a podcast called: Fundamental Health Podcast by Paul Saladino, and I think his approach is very helpful for people who want to follow a full carnivore diet. He is going to release a book called : The Carnivore Code.

This is his webpage:


Dr. Saladino is the leading authority on the science and application of the carnivore diet. He has used this diet to reverse autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, and mental health issues in hundreds of patients, many of whom had been told their conditions were untreatable. In addition to his personal podcast, Fundamental Health, he can be found featured on numerous podcasts including The Minimalists, Bulletproof Radio, The Dr. Gundry Podcast, The Ben Greenfield Podcast, Dr. Mercola, Health Theory, Mark Bell’s Power Project, and many others. He is a featured blogger for Psychology Today and is currently writing a book titled, “The Carnivore Code: Unlocking the secrets to optimal health by returning to our ancestral diet.”

Dr. Saladino completed residency in psychiatry at the University of Washington and is a certified functional medicine practitioner through the Institute for Functional Medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Arizona where he worked with Dr. Andrew Weil focusing on integrative medicine and nutritional biochemistry. Prior to medical school, Dr. Saladino worked as a physician assistant in Cardiology. It was during this time that he saw first hand the shortcomings of mainstream western medicine with its symptom focused, pharmaceutical based paradigm. He decided to return to medical school with the hope of better understanding the true roots of chronic disease and illness, and how to correct and reverse these. He now maintains a private practice in San Diego, California, and sees clients from all over the world virtually.

When he is not researching connections between nutritional biochemistry and chronic disease, he can be found in the ocean searching for the perfect wave, cultivating mindfulness, or spending time with friends and family.
 

A Jay

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Curious if it's fecal transplant?
I don't know what the microbiome thing is, but Mikhaila has mentioned that she has done many fecal translplants
Can't seem to find the original post, but she mentioned recently about how her C. diff issues went away after doing an oral fecal transplant protocol.

Basically she put the transplant into pills and took them orally because her C. diff didn't respond to the regular transplant protocol and thinking that this suggested her infection was actually in the small intestine decided to give the oral route a try. From what she said it actually worked, so good for her.

Can't say I'm interested in that particular protocol, though.. :whistle:
 

goyacobol

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thanks @PERLOU . Very interesting article.

The very important diversity of tribes with their own language and custom, forces me to generalize and take the most common. This article will not accurately reflect Inuit customs, which are too numerous, but will provide a global vision of their food culture.

Executive Summary
I- Presentation of the people
1. Who are they? Who are they?
2. Their eating habits
3. Hunting and conservation techniques

II- Food specificity
1. Food and meals
2. Food culture
3. Revenues

III- The impact on health of this type of diet
1. The positive aspects
2. The negative aspects
3. The advice we can provide

Conclusion
Bibliography
I- Presentation of the people
1. Who are they? Who are they?

Before I expand on the subject of Inuit food, I will first introduce you to this people

Inuit are a group of Aboriginal peoples who share cultural similarities and a common ethnic origin.


1) A mother and her baby in the kitchen

Indeed, the Inuit were a nomadic hunting people, the origin of this people is from Eastern Siberia, in present-day Russia.

About 8 to 6000 years ago, groups of nomadic hunters crossed the Bering Strait and continued their journey along the northern coasts of present-day Canada to Greenland.


2) Inuit Migration Flows
These individuals did not move without reason, they were simply following in the footsteps of marine mammals, caribou and also muskoxen. Only caloric sources present at these latitudes.

They live mainly in the Arctic regions of North America and Greenland, but also in eastern Siberia. There are currently about 150,000 Inuit in the various tribes. The most important tribes are the Eskimos (this term is pejorative for Inuit populations) with Nunavik and Nunavut in northern Canada, there are also the Kalaallit in Greenland, and the Yupiks in Alaska and Siberia. (Map below)


3) Distribution of the different tribes

2. Their eating habits

On average, 97% of the Inuit diet is made up of animal products and the remainder of plant products during the summer. The caloric intake is distributed on average as follows: with 30 to 40% in the form of protein, 50 to 75% fat and the rest in the form of carbohydrates. Almost all carbohydrates come from animal muscle glycogen, and a very small part from berries in summer. Their living environment obviously prevents all types of cultures.

3. Hunting and conservation techniques

For animals such as seals and whales, although they live in the water, Inuit call this hunting. This is due to the fact that they use mainly the harpoon. To catch a seal, the technique is to find a hole in the ice, wait for the animal to come to the surface to breathe and then harpoon it. More recently with the arrival of snowmobiles and guns, it has become easier to hunt seals when the animal is resting. For the hunting of birds they made slingshots. As for bear hunting, it was useful to them to have warm and thick skins, to make clothes and tents. To ensure a regular food supply, the Inuit hunt only as necessary and limit it to preserve the abundance of animals and thus avoid famine.

4) Ancestral hunting technique

5) Modern seal hunter

Conservation methods are at the very least unconventional for any other population living further south. Indeed, drying for edible skins, fermentation for fats and meat pheasant farming were and are frequently used conservation techniques.



Opposite, a modern dwelling, of a settled family from Greenland. We can observe many pieces of meat drying in the open air.



II) Food specificity
1. Power supply

Their traditional cuisine is mainly composed of raw foods from fish, marine and terrestrial mammals. However, you can cook broth and caribou meat or polar bear meat (especially given to dogs), seal meat from which they ate everything, such as blood, brains, eyes, etc. Depending on what the environment has to offer (ice floes, tundra, etc.).

The most frequently caught fish species are Arctic char, trout and salmon.

Marine mammals, eaten frequently, are the most common species of marine mammals. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
 
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Doug

Padawan Learner
Thanks to Keyhole for the great video! Very helpful!

For those who experience chronic diarrhea which only gets better with some fibre... It may be that the liver is producing too much bile.

I was certainly one who was suffering from bile acid disorder when I went full carnivore and had no idea what that was until I watched the video. Recently, per the recommendation in the video, I started taking milk thistle and BOOM! Diarrhea cured practically overnight. I will also add that I have also been eating fermented kimchi with every meal as well which technically isn't full carnivore but seems to be working for me.

On a different note I was wondering if anybody has experienced 'emotional detox' while on this diet?

For better or worse historically I have been one who cries very rarely yet recently since I've gone almost full carnivore I've cried somewhat heavily twice in two weeks. First, while reading Missing 411 (east coast edition) and second watching Lord of the Rings. Now, both of these probably qualify as cry worthy affairs, Missing 411 for how disturbing the disappearances were and LOTR for how inspirational it is, but again I almost never cry! Yet, there I was balling my eyes out in what I felt was a healthy manner. Additionally, I also felt more emotionally centered and strong while at work and when socializing with friends. So for what it is worth going carnivore may have more benefits than just physical and intellectual health but emotional as well.
 

Yas

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
So for what it is worth going carnivore may have more benefits than just physical and intellectual health but emotional as well.
Yes, I think that might be the case for many people.

Some time ago, I came across this blogger who claims to have improved a lot in terms of mood with a carnivore diet: Experiences of a Five-Year Carnivore, Part I

It seems that she had something similar to bipolar disorder and this diet stabilized her mood without the need of psychiatric drugs.

Here's an excerpt:

[...] In the meantime I planned out meals of just meat, kept reading about the successes of others, and I set a time frame I could live with: I would eat just meat for three weeks, taking me exactly to my 36th birthday. On my birthday I would eat cake as a reward.

That birthday cake was never to be, because by the time those three weeks were up, not only had I lost about 10 pounds, but my mood had stabilised. The major-depressive-disorder-turned-"soft"-bipolar that had been ruining my life at increasing speed since I was a teen was brought to a sudden standstill. It was utterly amazing, and no cake would ever be worth a return to that.

A short detour...
However, shortly after my birthday, I learned I was pregnant again. I was determined to have a zero-carb pregnancy, but for a variety of reasons, this didn't come to pass [4]. I did manage to keep my carbs low for most of the pregnancy (a first for me) and even had some zero-carb days in the third trimester.

...and a return.
A week or two after his birth, five years ago now, I restarted my carnivorous diet, and I've stayed on it since. It's easy [5]. My weight quickly normalised to about 130 lbs — some 60 lbs less than I weighed at the beginning of 2009.

Best of all, my mood has been stable without any medications since then, even under periods of enormous stress. For example, I have recently experienced intense grief due to life circumstances. Although the grief has been incredibly painful and difficult, it hasn't resulted in depression as I know it. While it hasn't been easy, it is simply incomparable to the emotional dysfunction of a psychiatric mood disorder. The difference between the normal mood variations I have now, and those I had then is physiological. It was correctable not by adding drugs, but by removing the drug-like components of my diet coming from plants.
 

anartist

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Can't seem to find the original post, but she mentioned recently about how her C. diff issues went away after doing an oral fecal transplant protocol.

Basically she put the transplant into pills and took them orally because her C. diff didn't respond to the regular transplant protocol and thinking that this suggested her infection was actually in the small intestine decided to give the oral route a try. From what she said it actually worked, so good for her.

Can't say I'm interested in that particular protocol, though.. :whistle:
Yes, it is not possible to find I think, as the original "Don't eat that" blog posts have been eaten by the Lion Diet.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
After Christmas I went back on a very close to zero carb carnivore diet (only a few nuts every now and then), and I started slowly to feel my 'mojo' returning – less fatigue, better and clearer thinking and a more positive mood. So, this is clearly a diet that has many beneficial effects on me, but I've lately developed a little problem – if it's a problem at all. Namely, I need much less sleep. The past weeks I've been sleeping between 4-5 hours per night, and at first it raised some concerns. However, I felt that after this short sleep it was completely impossible for me to sleep more, even when I took some extra melatonin, since I felt completely fine and rested.

If it wasn't for Jordan Peterson, who mentioned that he could manage with 3 hours of sleep since going on the 'lion diet', I would have been really concerned. Have you guys who are on the carnivore diet experienced anything similar?

Last night I slept only 3 hours, and since I had a pretty laborious work day ahead with 8 different lessons with teaching, I felt a little bit worried. I kept waiting for the 'crash' to occur, but it never came! After the last lesson, I was surprised to feel almost no tiredness.

I've searched similar testimonials on the web, and it looks like there are others who have experienced similar things. What worries me is that I have no idea if this a good thing in the long run, it's almost too good to be true. Any thoughts?
 

Oxajil

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
After Christmas I went back on a very close to zero carb carnivore diet (only a few nuts every now and then), and I started slowly to feel my 'mojo' returning – less fatigue, better and clearer thinking and a more positive mood. So, this is clearly a diet that has many beneficial effects on me, but I've lately developed a little problem – if it's a problem at all. Namely, I need much less sleep. The past weeks I've been sleeping between 4-5 hours per night, and at first it raised some concerns. However, I felt that after this short sleep it was completely impossible for me to sleep more, even when I took some extra melatonin, since I felt completely fine and rested.
I experienced something similar on the ketogenic diet. When I was on 0 carbs, I would wake up at 5am (sometimes 4am), wide awake and feeling rested, looking forward to breakfast! Some nights I'd wake up, feeling wide awake, in the middle of the night (2-3am), after which I'd go for a smoke and then back to sleep again for a couple of hours (smoking actually helped me feel wanting to go back to sleep). I don't think I ever slept and felt rested after only 3 hours, though, but people are different. I personally think it's natural, and perhaps you will revert back to 6-7 hours at some point? I'd say keep a close eye on how things go.

When I'm on moderate/high carbs, I need to sleep longer. I wanna go back to low carbs, too, but I'm worried about losing weight, though I'm gonna give it a try. Sleep was definitely of more quality when I was on that diet. It's not that I don't sleep well now, but I don't wake up full on alert-mode as I was when on a 0/low carb diet. Well, just a few thoughts :-)
 

anartist

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
After Christmas I went back on a very close to zero carb carnivore diet (only a few nuts every now and then), and I started slowly to feel my 'mojo' returning – less fatigue, better and clearer thinking and a more positive mood. So, this is clearly a diet that has many beneficial effects on me, but I've lately developed a little problem – if it's a problem at all. Namely, I need much less sleep. The past weeks I've been sleeping between 4-5 hours per night, and at first it raised some concerns. However, I felt that after this short sleep it was completely impossible for me to sleep more, even when I took some extra melatonin, since I felt completely fine and rested.

If it wasn't for Jordan Peterson, who mentioned that he could manage with 3 hours of sleep since going on the 'lion diet', I would have been really concerned. Have you guys who are on the carnivore diet experienced anything similar?

Last night I slept only 3 hours, and since I had a pretty laborious work day ahead with 8 different lessons with teaching, I felt a little bit worried. I kept waiting for the 'crash' to occur, but it never came! After the last lesson, I was surprised to feel almost no tiredness.

I've searched similar testimonials on the web, and it looks like there are others who have experienced similar things. What worries me is that I have no idea if this a good thing in the long run, it's almost too good to be true. Any thoughts?
My thoughts on this are that you are getting the sleep your body needs. I notice that when I am carnivore and/or fasting, that I need less sleep. For example the last three nights I have only had 5-1/2 hours of sleep, and I have been fasting the last 4-5 days. That said, there might be emotional or physical reasons for a cortisol spike after 3 hours, maybe your circadian rhythm is also a concern? You might want to look at the Melatonin thread, and experiment with that?
 

karo

Jedi
Aragorn, on sott was an article about sleep in relation to ketogenic diet, I will leave it here as it may be helpful for some who didn't stumble upon it yet :)
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I noticed that I have been waking up an hour before my usual time. Something like 6 hours of sleep, and I am wide awake. I attribute it to taking time-released melatonin, 1.5 mg. But I've also been cutting down on carbs, hoping to get below 10g a day. I've extended my holiday snacks for too long and it seems time to get back to low carb.
 
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