The Magnesium Miracle

seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
It looks like there are some serious issues with components like magnesium stearate , which is widely used in all the vitamin tablets.

_http://www.drrons.com/beware-of-additives-in-supplements.htm

Beware of Additives in Supplements
Stearates – Hydrogenated Fats Used in the Production of Most Supplements– Decrease Absorption and May Be Toxic
and Immunosuppressive

by Ron Schmid, ND, ©2003


(page 1 of 1) Articles Home

Magnesium stearate, stearic acid and calcium stearate, made by hydrogenating cottonseed or palm oil, are used throughout the supplements industry as lubricants. They are added to the raw materials in supplements so that production machinery will run at maximum speeds. These fatty substances coat every particle of the nutrients, so the particles will flow rapidly. This ensures that production schedules will meet profit targets.

Cottonseed oil has the highest content of pesticide residues of all commercial oils; cotton crops are heavily sprayed. In the hydrogenation process, the oil is subjected to high heat and pressure in the presence of a metal catalyst for several hours, creating a hydrogenated saturated fat. Hydrogenated vegetable fats contain altered molecules derived from fatty acids that may be toxic. The metal catalyst used in the hydrogenation process may also contaminate the stearates produced (see Erasmus, Fats and Oils).

While toxicity is one problem, decreased absorption is another.
In a study published in the journal Pharmaceutical Technology, the percent dissolution for capsules after 20 minutes in solution went from 90% without stearates to 25% with stearates (article available from us upon request). This delays the absorption of nutrients. Individuals with impaired digestion may have particular difficulty absorbing nutrients coated with stearates.

Another problem with stearates: concentrated doses of stearic acid suppress the action of T-cells, a key component of the immune system. The article “Molecular basis for the immunosuppressive action of stearic acid on T cells” appeared in the journal Immumology in 1990.

*
Companies that manufacture and transport magnesium stearate must file a Material Safety Data Sheet with the Environmental Protection Agency because concentrated magnesium stearate is classified as a hazardous substance.
* Its uses are listed as “ammunition, dusting powder, paint and varnish drier, binder, and emulsifier.” The section “Human Health Data” states that “Inhalation may irritate the respiratory tract” and “Acute ingestion may cause gastroenteritis.”
* Under the heading “Regulatory Information,” the paper states, “This product is hazardous under the criteria of the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard.” This information may be viewed at the web site www.hummelcroton.com/msds/mgstear_m.html
* Supplements manufacturers pass off magnesium stearate as a benign form of magnesium. Magnesium stearate is the magnesium salt of stearic acid, which is also used in supplements for the same purposes. The argument is made that small amounts of these substances do no harm. But do you really want them in your supplements every day? Remember, the sole purpose of using these substances is to make the machines go faster. Supplements can be made without them-it just takes more time, care, and attention to detail.

How Much Hydrogenated Lubricant Oils Are You Getting With Your Supplements?
Up to 5% of the average 1000 mg capsule or tablet is magnesium stearate. That’s 50 milligrams. Suppose you take 8 capsules or tablets a day. That’s 250 a month – or 12,500 mg of this hydrogenated oil, nearly half an ounce. That works out to about 6 ounces of hydrogenated oils a year, from just 8 pills a day. Many people take more supplements, and ingest pounds of this toxic oil we try to avoid in our diets – while directly inhibiting the utilization of the nutrients they’re supplementing!
one more article that stresses the dangers of magnesium stearate and titanium dioxide

_http://articles.mercola.com/sites/vitalvotes/archive/2009/03/26/the-hidden-dangers-in-nutritional-supplements.aspx
 

Aiming

The Living Force
seek10 said:
It looks like there are some serious issues with components like magnesium stearate , which is widely used in all the vitamin tablets.
Thanks for the information, seek10! I've only now seen that I've been taking melatonin that contains magnesium stearate (from biovea, by the way)! :scared:

I've been looking for melatonin that doesn't contain it, but haven't found any so far. Could someone please recommend a brand that's magnesium stearate free, that is, if you've discovered one already?
 

Odyssey

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Ah great! :mad: Luckily I just got some new supplements (Youngevity) that don't contain stearates.

Also be on the lookout for titanium dioxide, a whitener found in many products including some supplements. It's in my calcium. It's classified as "possibly carcinogenic" in humans.

Here's a link: http://www.ccohs.ca/headlines/text186.html
 

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
puzzle said:
seek10 said:
It looks like there are some serious issues with components like magnesium stearate , which is widely used in all the vitamin tablets.
Thanks for the information, seek10! I've only now seen that I've been taking melatonin that contains magnesium stearate (from biovea, by the way)! :scared:

I've been looking for melatonin that doesn't contain it, but haven't found any so far. Could someone please recommend a brand that's magnesium stearate free, that is, if you've discovered one already?
Although, I didn’t find melatonin on their product lists, Thorne Research and Metabolic Maintenance has supplements that don't contain magenesium stearate. (available at needs.com) They also use Adenosylcobalamin and/or Methylcobalamin for the b12 component of their supplements. Most B supplements on the market contain a cheap non-bioavailable form of “b12” Cyanocobalamin:

Cheap vitamins (non-methylated) will use standardized "USP" vitamins such as "Thiamin USP (thiamin HCL) vitamin B1." That's the chemical form of vitamin B1, and it actually requires a donation of cellular energy from your body before you can use it. The form of B12 in cheap vitamins is cyanocobalamin.

Quality vitamins, on the other hand, will use the "coenzyme" forms of the B vitamins. Thse will often be listed with the word "coenzyme," and the form of vitamin B12 will appear as either methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin. That's a sure sign of a high-end, quality multivitamin.
_http://www.naturalnews.com/rr-bioidenticalvitamins.html

Hydroxocobalamin combines with cyanide to form cyanocobalamin. We hypothesised that the amount of cyanocobalamin formed after a fixed dose of hydroxocobalamin given for cyanide poisoning would correlate with initial blood cyanide concentration. We determined blood cyanide concentration in 12 patients exposed to residential fires, and compared this with markers of the amount of cyanocobalamin formed after treatment with 5 g intravenous hydroxocobalamin. All relationships were highly correlated (r2 0.79-0.95), for the whole group, and there appeared to be an almost linear relationship for the 9 patients with initial cyanide concentration below 40 mumol/L. Above this concentration, no further cyanocobalamin was formed from a single 5 g dose of hydroxocobalamin. In one patient with initial blood cyanide concentration of 96 mumol/L, however, plasma cyanocobalamin concentration approximately doubled after a second 5 g dose of hydroxocobalamin. 5 g of hydroxocobalamin appears capable of binding all available cyanide ions for blood cyanide concentrations up to about 40 mumol/L. Beyond this, more hydroxocobalamin must be given for remaining cyanide ions to be bound. This information will allow clinicians to use rapidly measurable plasma cyanocobalamin concentrations to gauge severity of exposure and evaluate adequacy of treatment.
_http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7651005


I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of Vitamin B12 they are referring to the semisynthetic Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) that initially was contaminated with poisonous cyanide during its chemical extraction from animal tissues. Carbon columns are used during the extraction process and the carbon combines with nitrogen from the medium forming the poisonous cyanocobalamin, that scientists insist on calling Vitamin B12.

The original method used to extract Vitamin B 12 from its sources included heating the medium in a weak acid, the addition of cyanide ion, and exposure to light. In this process the coenzymes were converted to cyanocobalamin, yet this was over looked. (Review of Physiological Chemistry, Harper, Harold A., Lange Medical Publications, New York, 1977, page l81. Also refer to Cobalamin: Biochemistry and Pathophysiology, Wiley. N. and F. Sicuteri, New York, 1972.) MOREOVER, in the manufacture of vitamin supplements, cyanide is added to the medium because the carbon and nitrogen are needed to form large molecules as are found in vitamins; and IN ADDITION they need it to extract the B12 from fermentation liquors and liver homogenates. Carbon is needed in great quantities when making vitamins or any other manufactured vitamin or substance that mimics the natural vitamin that normally contains a lot of carbon.
_http://www.roylretreat.com/articles/b12.html


edit, addt'l data
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I took my first magnesium bath on Monday. I had been putting it off for months, but since the weather was cold damp snizzle all day, I figure there was no time better for a relaxing hot soak in the tub. Strange results. I first learned that there is a fine line between "as hot as you can stand it" and a first degree burn :O

I filled the tub and added about a cup and a half of MgCl salts. After painfully determining that the water was way too hot, and having cooled it down to tolerable, I immersed. After 15 minutes or so I began to get rather light headed and was starting to perspire profusely, which was not surprising, considering the temperature of the water. Figuring that I had had enough for a first experience, I pulled the plug. After the tub drained, I stood to shower off the residue from my skin. I felt an alarming vertigo and dizziness which lasted for an hour or two (I never have vertigo). This was followed by feelings of detachment from the body and lightheadedness. I could not get my body to normalize temperature for 2 or 3 hours, after which I felt extreme fatigue.

I did not feel up to the stretches and breathing/meditation that night, and I usually always do this on Mondays. I slept abnormally long, for me, that night and awakened Tuesday morning late. I felt exhausted all day, and rather stiff, and did not even consider attempting the breathing and meditation last night.

I awakened in the middle of the night (approx 2:00 AM) to a violent regurgitation/coughing event that is symptomatic of my neurological condition. I had not had any of these since going on the no gluten/dairy/soy diet a couple of months ago. This morning I again slept in later than normal and awakened with fever-like muscle/joint aches and general malaise, but no fever or any other symptoms. Now that I have been up for a while I am sort of coming out of it, but still stiff. I will probably take it very easy for the rest of the day.

What is happening? Is this a Herxheimer reaction? Have I overdosed on Mg? Has anyone else experienced similar symptoms after the first Mg soak? It is an understatement to say that it is off-putting.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
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Strange reaction. I thought about the same, a detox reaction? An overdose on Mg? It doesn't seem that you overdid the magnesium, but everybody is different. FWIW, here is some info on too much magnesium:

_http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/magnesium.asp#h8

Signs of excess magnesium can be similar to magnesium deficiency and include changes in mental status, nausea, diarrhea, appetite loss, muscle weakness, difficulty breathing, extremely low blood pressure, and irregular heartbeat
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
What is happening? Is this a Herxheimer reaction? Have I overdosed on Mg? Has anyone else experienced similar symptoms after the first Mg soak? It is an understatement to say that it is off-putting.

It could be that your body was shocked with the hot water then cooled down too fast with the shower. I have the same symptoms if I get too hot then cool down too fast. (Sometimes it even causes vomiting) I also have a neurological condition and have to be careful of extreme temperatures. Too hot and I can pass out, too cold and my muscles lock up, etc.

Maybe try a foot bath instead of a full body soak? :)

I never know what my body is going to do day to day, and try to err on the side of gentleness. That way I don't have too many days when I'm flat on my back wondering what happened. :lol:
 

Gandalf

SuperModerator
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FOTCM Member
Gimpy said:
What is happening? Is this a Herxheimer reaction? Have I overdosed on Mg? Has anyone else experienced similar symptoms after the first Mg soak? It is an understatement to say that it is off-putting.

It could be that your body was shocked with the hot water then cooled down too fast with the shower. I have the same symptoms if I get too hot then cool down too fast. (Sometimes it even causes vomiting) I also have a neurological condition and have to be careful of extreme temperatures. Too hot and I can pass out, too cold and my muscles lock up, etc.
I am no expert but i had observed that if i stay more than 12 minutes in hot water, when i get out of the bath after that, it is like all my energy is gone and it takes me quite a while before getting back to normal energy level.

Then maybe the water was a lot too hot for your body and maybe you stay there for too much time.

As far as an overdose, the only thing that i can say is that when i take a magnesium bath, i put more than 4 cups of magnesium salt in the water and everything is fine if the water is not too hot and if i do not stay for too much time in the bath.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
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Bohort said:
As far as an overdose, the only thing that i can say is that when i take a magnesium bath, i put more than 4 cups of magnesium salt in the water and everything is fine if the water is not too hot and if i do not stay for too much time in the bath.
I have done 4 cups of magnesium salt and keep the water at a comfortable temperature, not too hot and not too cold. It is always a most pleasurable experience. I can be in the bath reading a book :)

A magnesium bath also lowers the amount of magnesium taken orally, there can be laxative effects at a lower dose of oral magnesium.
 
H

Hildegarda

Guest
Rabelais said:
felt an alarming vertigo and dizziness which lasted for an hour or two (I never have vertigo). This was followed by feelings of detachment from the body and lightheadedness. I could not get my body to normalize temperature for 2 or 3 hours, after which I felt extreme fatigue.
Prolonged exposure to hot water alone (or heat, like in sauna) can do this. Lightheadedness is most likely a vascular effects (blood vessels dilating \ constricting too rapidly as a reaction to heat). I am prone to those myself, and use my MG as a foot spray rather than a whole body soak. Hope you soon feel better!
 

Odyssey

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Rabelais said:
After 15 minutes or so I began to get rather light headed and was starting to perspire profusely, which was not surprising, considering the temperature of the water. Figuring that I had had enough for a first experience, I pulled the plug. After the tub drained, I stood to shower off the residue from my skin. I felt an alarming vertigo and dizziness which lasted for an hour or two (I never have vertigo). This was followed by feelings of detachment from the body and lightheadedness. I could not get my body to normalize temperature for 2 or 3 hours, after which I felt extreme fatigue.
I found this about hot baths in one of my schoolbooks, Combining Old & New: Naturopathy for the 21st Century

...after a cold bath the body quickly recuperates its heat and remains warm, while a hot bath produces the opposite effect.
(...)
Hot baths are decidely stimulating, and rapidly produce redness of the skin with quickening of the pulse and respiration. Perspiration is poured out upon the face in great abundance, the mind becomes dull and inattentive, and, if the immersion is unduly prolonged, vertigo and apoplexy {one definition: sudden impairment of neurological function} may supervene.
(...)
The hot bath ought therefore to be employed cautiously or not at all by persons of sanguine {exuberant, abundant} temperament, and those of robust or plethoric {ruddy complexion} habit of body, expecially if there is any hereditary tendency to apoplexy in their families.
Kind of an "old-timey" quote but FWIW...
 

Laura

Administrator
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FOTCM Member
Sounds to me like the body was starved for magnesium, took some on and started using it in the energy process of detoxing. So I would definitely vote for a Herxheimer reaction. That wasn't very much magnesium, either, but maybe the water was too hot? Generally, when I take a really hot soak, I put a cold cloth on my head.

The sleep and tiredness suggest that your body has been starving for sleep, too.

Remember, slow and easy as she goes.
 

CDixon

A Disturbance in the Force
Fascinating reading....thank you to everyone here for sharing their knowledge. My head is spinning trying to sort it all out! I think, if I "get it" right:

I should:
Take at least 500-600mg Mg a day
Take ZERO supplimental Ca
Eat iodine rich foods to support thyroid
Eat 3tbsps of virgin coconut oil daily, avoiding all vegetable oils

Well, I may not know as much as I thought I did...but I now know enough to at least begin!

My Symptoms:
I have been freezing cold (when nobody else is) and my resting heart rate is 48-51 (I am NOT an athlete - I am a 48 y/o woman) and have very dry skin. It has to be Magnesium deficiency or a low thyroid - dont'cha think? . :cry:

I really feel like there is a chance to fix this thing naturally. I am not a fan of big medicine and the drug companies.

Thank You again - Much appreciation!

CDixon :)
 

Vulcan59

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Moderator
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Hi CDixon,

Welcome to the forum. :) Did you read through the UltraMind Solution Quizzes?

By the way, we recommend all new members to post an introduction in the Newbies board telling us a bit about themselves, how they found the cass material, and how much of the work here they have read. Have a read through that board to see how others have done it. Thanks.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Vulcan59 said:
That is a good start to have an idea which might be the main imbalances, also the Ultra Simple diet is a good start: http://www.cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=13241.0

If for some reason calcium supplementation is taken, it must be coupled with sufficient magnesium.
 
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