The New History of Mankind: Who Are we? What are we? How did we get here?

Oxajil

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@Oxajil The scans are perfect, thank you. Does your library happen to have her second book When Zarathustra Spoke: The Reformation Of Neolithic Culture And Religion too?:whistle:
Thank you for editing them. :thup: I just checked the catalogue for her second book, they don't have it unfortunately!
 

Laura

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There are 8 copies of "When Zarathustra Spoke" on amazon.com

This one is the most important follow-up to "Plato, Prehistorian". Zarathustra takes us pretty much down to the beginnings of recorded history, i.e. the civilizations of Mesopotamia.

It's a brilliant book, IMO, and makes sense of a lot of contradictory data.

So, basically, with "Origins of the Worlds Myths" to "Plato, Prehistorian" and then "When Zarathustra Spoke", you get almost a complete history of homo sapiens sapiens. At least as complete as can ever be expected considering the enormous spans of time and scarcity of evidence.

Our job is to read this material, note that so much is hinted at by Cs, and many details filled in by them that actually fit into this framework, and thereby gain a better understanding of who we are, what we are, and how we got here. Knowing these things can not only give us better understanding of what is going on around us, but what are the prospects for the future of humanity. The Cs have given some seemingly grim forecasts, but in light of these works, the "grimness" becomes more comprehensible and we can lose our self-centeredness.

Obviously, Sweatman's book fits into the picture too, and many other books that fill in the details about cosmic cataclysms. But, overall, I think that the materials are available to construct a pretty good approximation of human history.
 

itellsya

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There are 8 copies of "When Zarathustra Spoke" on amazon.com
That has free delivery to Europe too (at least on my screen) and it says there's more stock on its way, no time frame is given though. I ordered ours from Amazon.fr a few weeks ago (and so i would guess it's also available from the other Amazon's in the EU as well) but the delivery time is up to a month - not sure why - still free delivery though.

It also seems to be in stock at the US publishers page, although i remember shipping to the EU was pricey:
 

itellsya

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I'm about half way through reading Plato Prehistorian, in it Settegast explains just how important caves were to these peoples, what they were attempting to depict, or recording, and so on, and she provides a number of images of the cave art itself. Today i came across some snaps posted on Twitter by a researcher from inside Llonin cave, in Asturias, Spain, and, while i've seen the odd similar picture before, i thought these pictures were pretty evocative - particularly those shot from a distance giving you a wider view. Maybe they just had more impact because Settegast makes the reality of these peoples and their history truly come to life in her book:


Also, for anyone who hasn't seen the documentary Caves of Forgotten Dreams by Werner Herzog (mentioned on the forum here), i'd recommend watching it. I think i'll re-watch it once i've finished Prehistorian.

Below is 15 minutes worth of snippets from the 90minute+ documentary:

Werner Herzog's epic documentary film 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams' (2010) explores the Paleolithic murals of Chauvet Cave, France. The undulating walls of the cave are adorned with remarkable depictions of animals from that far removed time, including the extinct megaloceros, wooly rhinoceros, cave bears, cave lions and hyenas. The remarkable condition of the these most ancient artworks is simply breathtaking considering their age of over 30,000 years.
 

Gaby

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There's an interview done to Witzel, author of The Origins of the Worlds Myths, conducted a year after the book was published. Even though the interviewer might not be everyone's type, Witzel gives a very good synopsis of his book in just under an hour. I read the book and I thought that it would have been nice to have listened to that synopsis before reading the whole thing. So here it is for those of you who might have listening time (you can skip the audio of the interviewer and her promo!):

 

whitecoast

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Also, for anyone who hasn't seen the documentary Caves of Forgotten Dreams by Werner Herzog (mentioned on the forum here), i'd recommend watching it. I think i'll re-watch it once i've finished Prehistorian.
Thanks for the video Itellsya. It just reminded me of a small TED talk about abstract symbols found in the paleolithic cave paintings. Nothing about a writing system per se, but the author's research found 32 symbols over many places:


About the author:
Genevieve von Petzinger earned international media attention with her discovery of ancient geometric signs from the Ice Age. Von Petzinger discovered a repeating pattern of symbols carved on prehistoric cave walls. She has compiled a database of 5,000 geometric shapes, lines and squiggles from 146 Ice Age caves in France and garnered global attention.
 

Laurs

Padawan Learner
I read the book and I thought that it would have been nice to have listened to that synopsis before reading the whole thing. So here it is for those of you who might have listening time (you can skip the audio of the interviewer and her promo!):
Thank you Gaby for posting this interview and your advice. Interesting to listen to what he has to say, especially his comments at the end (56:50) where he says that we've always underestimated our ancestors and that they have really thought quite deeply about us, where we have come from, who we are and where we go, that ultimately, it is a question of death that people are concerned with and try to answer in various ways and that there is no perfect answer to that. I got the book on my Kindle in the meantime and start reading it now.
 

latulipenoire

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Thank you for all the references and help sharing the books. Today I've stumbled upon this article that supposedly describes the trip of Gurdjieff to Lascaux Cave:

The Gurdjieff Journal—Fourth Way Perspectives

Gurdjieff at Lascaux

August 1949

Gurdjieff saw The Great Stag at Lascaux, Atlantis, Fourth Way
Dying of cancer, Gurdjieff visited the caves of Lascaux, his last wish. The prehistoric art he saw there—was it an Atlantean legominism?
Two months before Mr. Gurdjieff's death he made his last auto excursion to visit the prehistoric caves of Lascaux. In effect, it was his last wish. Discovered by chance in 1940, just after the German occupation of France, Lascaux had been opened to the public only in 1948. J. G. Bennett had visited the caves then and when he and Gurdjieff met soon after, Bennett told him of the spectacular and mysterious paintings and etchings on the walls. Despite Gurdjieff's increasing infirmity, his swollen legs and gaz—said Bennett, "He looked much older and moved with greater difficulty than when I had come to Paris the year before"—Gurdjieff insisted on making the trip.

Gurdjieff's Last Journey Begins
And so on the morning of August 31, 1949, Gurdjieff, "smoking a cigarette in a big black holder, with his red fez at a jaunty angle on the back of his head and a pocketbook bulging with thousand-franc notes," left Paris in a car loaded with students and hampers of food. Two more carloads of Gurdjieff's students followed.
"We left at 9 in the morning," wrote Elizabeth Mayall in her diary, "and had a marvelous drive through Clermont-Ferrand and by the Puy de Dôme to Montdoré. I thought it very beautiful. Mr. Bennett's car led. Five people [who had taken a train] had hired a car at Vichy in order to come too. We stopped at Montdoré for lunch [and] went on to Montignac." The party made the 400 mile trip from Paris to the village of Montignac, near the caves in the Dordogne region in the south of France, in 12 hours, arriving at 9 in the evening.
Gurdjieff dining, Fourth Way, Lascaux, Atlantis
They dined at Le Relais du Soleil d'Or, Montignac's fanciest hotel, where Bennett had made reservations. Tired, his legs swelling, Gurdjieff talked little. He did speak about religion, saying that while Roman Catholicism had degenerated entirely, the Eastern Orthodox Church had retained at least something. About midnight, he finally retired. Though Gurdjieff seemed no better the next morning, he insisted on going to the caves and, according to Elizabeth Mayall, "seemed even anxious to see them." About 10 in the morning Gurdjieff descended into the series of chambers which extend deep into the hillside. There he saw the paintings of various animals, most spectacularly those of deer and bulls. At the time these were the richest known specimens of prehistoric art.
An Emblem like the Sphinx
Said Elizabeth Mayall: "I remember him standing with his feet apart, leaning on his stick, with his head thrown back, looking up at the Great Stag with the stylized antlers in the first gallery." Inspecting the paintings, Gurdjieff told his students they were the work of "a brotherhood that existed after the loss of Atlantis seven or eight thousand years ago," likely a reference to the society Akhaldan.
"As he stood looking at the paintings," said J. G. Bennett, "he seemed completely to belong there. He explained various symbols, and especially the painting of a strange composite animal, which he said was like the Sphinx, the 'emblem' of an esoteric society."
Bennett, Mayall, Gurdjieff, Fourth Way, Lascaux, Atlantis
Bennett asked if he meant "symbol."
"No. Emblem," Gurdjieff declared. "At that time there were societies with special knowledge, and each society had an emblem by which the members recognized each other. Same way as we have Enneagram."
He implied, according to Bennett, that Lascaux was the center of an esoteric society and that the Great Stag was not only its emblem but its reminding factor for its work. The horns on the reindeer, he said, are like Beelzebub's horns. The number of points on the antlers represented the degree of attainment of the man. (He elaborates upon these degrees in the First Series.)
On the way to the caves after leaving Paris, and during and between meals, Gurdjieff had spoken about the "Inner God," saying, "If you learn to obey Inner God, this is a thousand times better than the Ten Commandments, which only tell us how to live, but cannot help man to work." Later he spoke about immortality. "Unmortal is a very big thing, but is not all. If a man works he can become of use even to God." He then pointed to Bennett and added: "There are two kinds of unmortal. He now has already Kesdjan body. This is unmortal, but not real unmortal. Real unmortal only comes with higher body. He have body for soul—but must also have body for 'I'."
Describing the difference between Paradise and the Sun Absolute, Gurdjieff noted: "You can go to Paradise with Kesdjan body. But Paradise is only good for two or three days. Imagine what it would be next year, year after, hundred years. Must not be satisfied with Paradise—must find way to Soleil Absolu."
To grow antlers or horns one must have more than a physical, or carnal, body. The higher the reason, the higher the body one must have attained, for the body is the support of reason. In Russia 1915–1917 Gurdjieff spoke of the crystallization of these bodies, designating them as carnal, natural, spiritual and divine bodies. Considering the context—that Gurdjieff is on his way to see the caves at Lascaux and that he realized the end of physical life was drawing near for him—his words take on an added weight.

How Old Are the Paintings?
Viewing the paintings on the cave walls, Gurdjieff said they were 8,000 years old. Here he might only have been speaking of the years before the birth of Jesus Christ and not including the two thousand years after. If so, the paintings would be some 10,000 years old.
Bennett reminded him that experts dated the paintings to 18,000 to 20,000 years. Gurdjieff wouldn't hear of it. "He insisted," said Bennett, "that this work was done after the loss of Atlantis."
Bennett told him that the evidence from the implements and bones in the cave showed that the paintings "go back before the time of the loss of Atlantis."
According to Bennett, "Gurdjieff immediately replied in a rather shocked tone, 'How can that be? These cannot be before the loss of Atlantis.' He then remained silent and I could get no more out of him."
When the group collected by the cars in front of the caves, Gurdjieff instructed Bennett to drive in another car. Then on the way back to Paris at Tulle, without any ceremony, he told Bennett: "I go left; you go right."
"Then we must say goodbye to you," answered Bennett. "Yes, goodbye!" Could what Gurdjieff is saying to Bennett relate to Bennett's denial of Gurdjieff's date for the Lascaux paintings?
As can be seen from Gurdjieff's comments at Lascaux and his First Series, the destruction of Atlantis is a pivotal event for him. The only historic accounts of Atlantis occur in Plato's Timaeus and in his Critas in which an Egyptian priest tells the famous Greek statesman Solon: "There have been and will be many different calamities to destroy mankind, the greatest of them by fire and water, lesser ones by countless other means....You remember only one deluge, though there have been many...." Evidence suggests that the deluge the priest refers to occurred around 9,600 B.C. writes Mary Settegast in her book Plato Prehistorian. Further, she believes that "The wave of inexplicably sophisticated settlers that appeared in the Near East in the last half of the eighth millennium B.C., may actually have been refugees from Plato's ruined cultures in the west."

Plato's Atlantis
Plato's location of Atlantis, Gurdjieff, Fourth Way, Lascaux
Plato gives a date of 10,000 b.c. for the deluge; the most compelling evidence for this date, Settegast says, is "simply the number and nature of the newly founded settlements that appeared in the east around 7,500 to 7,300 b.c. From Syria to Palestine to east Anatolia and the Zagros mountains, extraordinarily advanced communities emerged, seemingly out of nowhere. An inventory of their collective remains shows that virtually all of the elements upon which the civilizations of later ages would be based—complex hybrid grains, advanced architectural techniques, functional pottery, even the beginnings of metal work—were introduced almost simultaneously by this wave of new settlers." We also see this later with the fullbodied emergence of the ancient Egyptian culture in 3,000 b.c. Bennett also maintained that "Gurdjieffassociated Atlantis with pre-sand Egypt..."
Speaking of Atlantis, the Egyptian priest said: "There was an island opposite the strait [of Gibraltar]... an island larger than Libya and Asia combined.... On this island of Atlantis had arisen a powerful and remarkable dynasty of kings, who ruled the whole island, and many other islands as well, and parts of the continent. In addition, it controlled, within the strait, Libya up to the borders of Egypt and Europe as far as Tyrrhenis [Italy]. This dynasty, gathering its whole power together, attempted to enslave, at a single stroke, your country and ours and the territory within the strait." [Emphasis added] Given that the Atlanteans had conquered Europe as far as Italy would mean that they might know of and use the caves of Lascaux. From Gurdjieff's viewpoint then, he is eyewitness to the paintings and etchings of the Atlanteans after their Atlantean island homeland was swallowed up in the deluge of 9,600 b.c. Could the paintings have been the work of survivors of the cataclysm as a means of preserving their knowledge? In other words, are the paintings the Legominism of the Atlanteans? The Atlanteans were rich, powerful and technologically advanced, according to Plato's Critas:
For many generations, so long as the divine element in their nature survived, they observed the laws and loved the divine to which they were akin. They retained a certain greatness of mind, and treated the vagaries of fortune and one another with wisdom and forbearance, as they reckoned that qualities of character were far more important than their present prosperity. So they bore the burden of their wealth and possessions lightly, and did not let their high standard of living intoxicate them or make them lose their self-control, but saw soberly and clearly that all these things flourish only on a soil of common goodwill and individual character, and if pursued too eagerly and overvalued destroy themselves and morality with them. So long as these principles and their divine nature remained unimpaired the prosperity which we have described continued to grow. But when the divine element in them became weakened by frequent admixture with mortal stock, and their human traits became predominant, they ceased to be able to carry their prosperity with moderation. To the perceptive eye the depth of their degeneration was clear enough, but to those whose judgment of true happiness is defective they seemed, in their pursuit of unbridled ambition and power, to be at the height of their fame and fortune.
The Circle Completed
Gurdjieff saw the Great Hall of the Bulls, Fourth Way, Lascaux, Atlantis
In the tenth millennium, the Egyptian priest told Solon, a war broke out between the Atlantic maritime empire of the Atlanteans and the Athenians. The Athenians were able to check the advances of the Atlanteans, but both were overwhelmed, for: "At a later time there were earthquakes and floods of extraordinary violence, and in a single dreadful day and night all your fighting men were swallowed up by the earth, and the island of Atlantis was similarly swallowed up by the sea and vanished."
And so, from this point of view, at Lascaux the circle of Gurdjieff's life is completed. Is this why he is spoken of before entering the caves as "seeming anxious"?
His mature life began with a question: What is the sense and significance of life on earth and human life in particular?
Believing that the esoteric societies of ancient civilizations held the answer, he traveled to many remote and dangerous areas. Finally, he discovered the origin of esoteric knowledge in ancient Egypt, "only not from the one that we know but from one which we do not know. This Egypt was in the same place as the other but it existed much earlier," he said. Realizing that over time elements of the teaching had migrated northward, he sought out these elements and then reassembled and reformulated them for contemporary mentality. To differentiate the teaching from the three well-known classical ways— that of the Hatha yogi, the monk and the Raja yogi—he called it the Fourth Way, the way of self-transformation in ordinary life. As he said, "The religions of the West have degenerated to such an extent that for a long time there has been nothing alive in them. Various occult and mystical societies and naïve experiments in the nature of spiritualism, and so on, can give no results whatever. And the position would indeed be hopeless if the possibility of yet a fourth way did not exist. The fourth way requires no retirement into the desert, does not require a man to give up and renounce everything by which he formerly lived. The fourth way begins much further on than the way of the yogi [way of the mind]."
Earlier, having recognized that "Unless the 'wisdom' of the East and the 'energy' of the West could be harnessed and used harmoniously, the world would be destroyed," Gurdjieff took upon himself the mission to bring this ancient teaching of the Fourth Way to the West. That was in 1912. Now at Lascaux, just months before his Rascooarno, he was present to a Legominism whose essence lay in the symbols and their vibrations of the true origin of esoteric knowledge—the Atlanteans.
Just eight days before his death, Gurdjieff saw the first publisher's proofs of his Legominism, the First Series of All and Everything. As he had said earlier—"I now very tired and I know that when I finish this last book my work will be done. So now I can die, because my task in life is coming to an end."

Notes
1. We left at 9 in the morning. See J. G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J. G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949 (York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser, 1991), pp. 51–52. At the time the diaries were written, Bennett's wife Winifred Alice Bennett was still living. Within three months of her death, on July 25, 1957, he married Elizabeth Howard, née Mayall.
2. At the time. In September 2000, at a cave near Perigueux in the Dordogne region, prehistoric art was discovered which archaeologists date back some 30,000 years. The Cussac cave walls show hundreds of yards of detailed and well-preserved images of animals including bison—one twelve feet long—horses, rhinoceroses and human figures.
3. A brotherhood. See J. G. Bennett, Gurdjieff: Making a New World (New York: Harper & Row, 1973), p. 87. See also, "Returning to the Source," Telos, vol. 3, no. 4.
4. Degree of attainment. See J. G. Bennett, Witness: The Autobiography of John G. Bennett (Tucson, Ariz.: Omen Press, 1974), pp. 264–65.
5. Inner God. Ibid., p. 264.
6. Designation of bodies. See P. D. Ouspensky, In Search of the Miraculous, p. 41.
7. Loss of Atlantis. See Bennett, op cit., p. 55.
8. Implements and bones. In themselves, these do not prove the date of the paintings, only that there were people there 18,000–20,000 years ago.
9. I go left, you go right. Gurdjieff's designation of direction may have an inner meaning as can be seen in the First Series.
10. Different calamities. See Plato's Timaeus and Critas (New York: Penguin, 1977), p. 35.
11. The wave of. See Mary Settegast, Plato, Prehistorian (Hudson, N.Y.: Lindisfarne Press, 1990), p. 9.
12. Simply the number and nature. Ibid., p. 67.
13. Atlantis and pre-sand Egypt. See Bennett, op. cit., p. 86.
14. There was an island. Ibid., pp. 37–38.
15. When the divine element. Ibid., p. 145. The parallel with contemporary America is instructive.
16. Mortal stock. There were some mortals living on Atlantis when the Atlanteans appeared. As Plato relates in theTimaeus, pp. 122–23: "The men of the first generation who lived cowardly or immoral lives were, it is reasonable to suppose, reborn in the second generation as women; and it was therefore at that point of time that the gods produced sexual love.... A man's genitals are naturally disobedient and self-willed, like a creature that will not listen to reason, and will do anything in their mad lust for possession. Much the same is true of the matrix or womb of women, which is a living creature within them which longs to bear children. And if it is left unfertilized long beyond the normal time, it causes extreme unrest, strays about the body, blocks the channels of the breath and causes in consequence acute distress and disorders of all kinds."
17. Origin of esoteric knowledge. According to Gurdjieff's First Series, the terrestrial origin of esoteric knowledge is Beelzebub's tribe, which was centered in Atlantis. They had relations with an esoteric society of Atlanteans, the Society of Akhaldans. Intuiting the coming deluge, Beelzebub's tribe departed for Ethiopia. Surviving members of the Society of Akhaldans made their way to Ethiopia. Beelzebub's tribe advised them to reside in Egypt, which they did. They were the foundation of the ancient Egyptian civilization. See William Patrick Patterson's video Gurdjieff in Egypt: The Origin of Esoteric Knowledge.
18. I now very tired. See Fritz Peters, Gurdjieff Remembered (York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser, 1971), p. 110.
From:
 

Laura

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Now we have a searchable PDF (with cropped pages) of the Plato book. Send me a PM if you need a copy.
I noticed I didn't get an overwhelming response to the offer of the Witzel book, but I sure hope you get one for the Settegast book. It's just literally one of the most amazing things I've ever read for a LOT of reasons including the fact that it definitely fits the Cs historical scenario!!
 

goyacobol

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I noticed I didn't get an overwhelming response to the offer of the Witzel book, but I sure hope you get one for the Settegast book. It's just literally one of the most amazing things I've ever read for a LOT of reasons including the fact that it definitely fits the Cs historical scenario!!
Well, there was only 1 Settegast book left on Amazon and I couldn't pass it up. I have been curious about Zarathustra ever since you asked the Cs about him. I have gotten used to Kindle reading but if the power goes out (hopefully before that) I'll have a good book to read.

Session 14 August 2016:
Q: (L) So in other words, what we are looking at here through a probably distorted survival via Zoroaster or Zarathushtra is that the Aryan religion was based first of all on a supreme principle of infinite time and infinite space from which was born essentially "good mind" and "evil mind" as Zoroaster put it?

A: Yes. STO and STS duality.

Q: (L) And this same religion, either in its older form or its later elaboration by Zarathushtra, was the origin of the ideas of free will?

A: Yes

Q: (L) Of savior gods?

A: Yes

Q: (L) The Six Bounteous Immortals, or I guess what we could say archetypes or sixth density?

A: Yes

Q: (L) Basically, it almost seemed as though it was a religion about information. Everything emerges from information, but there are some other very particular things about it that are very advanced. They were talking about things that physicists talk about nowadays.

A: Yes

Q: (L) It also seems to be the closest religious exposition of anything that I've come across to what we have received via these transmissions.

A: Yes

Q: (L) I'm just saying "close", because obviously there are some distortions and so forth. So did Zarathushtra modify this original religion because he had a vision, or...?

A: The ideas had already been corrupted, and Zarathushtra sought to recover the truth.

Q: (L) So it had already been corrupted, and he was trying to bring it back in line. He got close, but didn't quite make it. Is that it?

A: Yes

Q: (L) And what had it been corrupted to?

A: The Indian Vedas will give clues.

Q: (L) Maybe he wasn't wrong when he said that the daevas were demons. Were the daevas like STS beings?

A: Close

Q: (L) Were they like 4th density STS?

A: Yes
 

etezete

Jedi Master
Well, we have to find an option because this book is just really stupendous so far.

If somebody gets a clean copy (my used one was marked up a bit), please scan it and send me a PDF and then those who can't get a copy can write to me privately and I'll send it to them.
for those who don't mind reading on the screen, there is a free online pdf available:
_Laurent Guyenot From Yahweh To Zion Jealous God, Chosen People, Promised Land... Clash Of Civilizations ( 2018) Pdf : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
 

itellsya

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The discussion of information and creation, the sessions below, plus other comments, came to mind when reading the following in Settegast's Zarathustra - if i'm understanding things correctly (i'm about half way through the book):

Mary Settegast - When Zarathustra Spoke. The Reformation Of Neolithic Culture And Religion said:
Each of these primal beings, presumably Ahura Mazda (or Spenta Mainyu) and the Hostile Spirit (Angra Mainyu), made a deliberate choice,
according to his own nature, between good and evil. Ahura Mazda then created all things, first in spirit (menog) and then in material form (getig), both perfect states of being.


Well, there was only 1 Settegast book left on Amazon and I couldn't pass it up. I have been curious about Zarathustra ever since you asked the Cs about him. I have gotten used to Kindle reading but if the power goes out (hopefully before that) I'll have a good book to read.

Session 14 August 2016:

[...]

Q: (L) Basically, it almost seemed as though it was a religion about information. Everything emerges from information, but there are some other very particular things about it that are very advanced. They were talking about things that physicists talk about nowadays.

A: Yes

Q: (L) It also seems to be the closest religious exposition of anything that I've come across to what we have received via these transmissions.

[...]

Session 22 September 2018

(Approaching Infinity) So how does the first cell manifest?

A: Partly correct, pair.

Q: (L) Well, what is the other part of it?

A: Genome manufactured in 4th density and sent through realm curtain in a manner similar to how virii are transmitted.

Q: (L) So the elements were developing, were present, and jostling around together in the primordial soup or whatever... But then the genome was manufactured.

(Pierre) It goes both ways: downside up, molecules reaching critical mass, and from top down - from 4th density down to 3rd.

(L) So in a sense, that's the basic thing about intelligent design. There is a lot of parts to it that rely on the nature of the physical world itself and how all the different elements - which themselves come into being via information - accumulate or gather or interact. And then a direct intervention is added. That's what it amounts to.

A: Yes indeed!!!


Q: (Joe) Who sends it through the realm curtain from 4th density?

A: Transient passengers. Perhaps the term will have more meaning now?

Q: (Approaching Infinity) It's almost like in the Bell Witch case when there were direct manifestations of things. I would imagine that if there's this information being sent through the realm curtain into 3rd density, if you were an observer watching in the sea water with a microscope, it might appear as if the cell just manifests. It just takes form and looks like it came out of nowhere.

A: Very close indeed!
 

Laura

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It's probably a good idea for those who are really interested in what our earliest ancestors likely believed (and they may have been closer to the truth and the veil between densities may have been thinner than we imagine today), to get and read some material on Zoroastrianism. I've read a dozen or so books and can recommend these as starters:




The last one is a bit pricey, but if you really are curious, it's worth it.

It was because I had all this info in my head that I was able to immediately seen connections in Witzel's work on myths, and Settegast's work on paleolithic culture, especially Cave Art.
 
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