Anti-Candida, Inflammation, Heavy Metals Detox and Diet

Gimpy

The Living Force
Xman said:
Nienna Eluch said:
I am wondering why you say, "Lots of almond milk, oat milk, rice milk if you do not tolerate dairy. "

For some reason I think that all milk is yucky. :/ It leaves a "yucky" aftertaste in my mouth. Probably just something wrong with my thinking, and maybe you say we need the milk for protein, just checking.

"almond milk, oat milk, rice milk" - these aren't really milks. They are drinkable liquids made from almond, oat, rice with water base. They have no dairy and are not even related to real milk.


Watch out for added sugar on those alternative milks. The few I've found locally have too much. (But I'm still looking)
 
Gimpy said:
Xman said:
Nienna Eluch said:
I am wondering why you say, "Lots of almond milk, oat milk, rice milk if you do not tolerate dairy. "

For some reason I think that all milk is yucky. :/ It leaves a "yucky" aftertaste in my mouth. Probably just something wrong with my thinking, and maybe you say we need the milk for protein, just checking.

"almond milk, oat milk, rice milk" - these aren't really milks. They are drinkable liquids made from almond, oat, rice with water base. They have no dairy and are not even related to real milk.


Watch out for added sugar on those alternative milks. The few I've found locally have too much. (But I'm still looking)

Yeah I was looking at those the other day at Whole Foods. The almond milk had, I believe, 80 grams of sugar per container.
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
Here's the result of a search for a rice milk recipe, from a blog here: http://onlysometimesclever.wordpress.com/2007/06/08/healthy-creamy-yummy-rice-milk-recipe/


Rice Milk

7 1/2 c. water (distilled is best)
2 Tbsp vanilla (OR 1-2 tsp cinnamon)
1 c. brown rice flour or white rice flour
1 rounded c. brown rice protein (found at Whole Foods, or various online retailers)
1 tsp. guar gum
1 tsp. xanthan gum
1/2 cup canola, safflower or sunflower oil
2 c. honey (OR 1 1/2 cup honey and 1/2 cup xylitol)
(Sometimes, I also grind up four dairy-free tabs of acidophilus with a mortar & pestle, and add that, too)

1. Over high heat, bring six cups of water to boil in a large saucepan.
2. In a small bowl or mixing cup, combine vanilla or cinnamon, rice flour and 1 1/2 cups water, mixing thoroughly.
3. While you are waiting for the water to boil, in a large, heat-safe mixing bowl, whisk to combine brown rice protein powder, guar gum and xanthan gum. Add the oil, and stir thoroughly. Add honey, and mix with an electric mixer until well-combined.
4. Once the water in the saucepan boils, stir in the rice flour mixture, stirring constantly with a whisk. Turn down heat to medium-low and boil at least five minutes, stirring constantly, until the mixture is thick and no longer gritty.
5. Then, pour the brown rice mixture to the mixing bowl, using a silicone spatula to scrape the sides of the saucepan. (Be careful, as the brown rice mixture is very hot. Alternately, cover the rice mixture and cool it until it is easier/safer to handle.) With an electric mixer, beat on high until ingredients are thoroughly combined.

Makes 11 cups concentrated mix. To serve, mix 1/4 c. concentrate with 3/4 c. water to make one cup, and stir or shake well. Or, measure 1 cup mix into the bottom of a quart jar, adding water to fill jar. Shake well to mix. (… or 2 cups for a 1/2 gallon jar, or 4 cups for a gallon jar.)

Store the mix (and diluted rice milk) in the fridge in an airtight container.

Diluted rice milk stays pretty well emulsified; there’s not a whole lot of settling. However, give your rice milk a shake or stir before serving.


********************************************************************************************************************************

This looks good, though I'm not sure honey is good for candida. It would be worth a try for those who are lactose intolerant. This lady's small children
are allergic to milk and soy, and she goes through a lot of this milk for them.


Enjoy

Gimpy
 

Laura

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Leave out the honey and add a bit of stevia.

We mostly use quinoa and oat drinks since they have less sugar and there is one brand that has almost none.

Thought I would report that I took my first dose of fluconazole two days ago and, so far, die-off symptoms (releasing of metals according to one view) is minimal. I think that using the sauna for three months prior to taking the azole and eating more or less macrobiotically has been a good preparation.

I want to stress the idea that everyone needs to read the literature and evaluate their own situation individually. What I have written about is my own condensed "program" that is pretty much specific to me. I've also considered my type O blood to some extent and adjusted for that.

I notice that Sherry Rogers, in her book "Pain Free in Six Weeks" (GOOD book!) really emphasizes the role of nightshade plant foods in causing pain and toxicity. That doesn't seem to be a problem for me with tomatoes, but certainly, I believe I have noticed a problem with potatoes, eggplant and peppers. I would suggest that she might be type A. So, even when reading her books, keep in mind that what worked perfectly for her, may not work for everyone.

Another thing to be noted since I think there is confusion: on days when I do the sauna (which was every day for over a month) I don't do the supplements with the morning shake - or, if I do, I then do the sauna soon after. In other words, you don't have to load up on supplements FOUR times a day...

Lately, I've just been taking the whole batch of stuff in the morning with the shake, and then a few extra oils at night. But, that's just my preference and it seems to be fine so far.

I've been eating in the following way, estimated daily:

40% brown rice or quinoa (occasionally millet - very occasionally oatmeal)
25% vegetables - greens, etc
20% dried beans or peas, cooked
10% fish, meat, eggs
5% berries and spirulina

This seems to make me feel about right and I really don't have any cravings.

My daughter eats more vegetables than brown rice, but I just really like the brown rice and it is very satisfying.
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
My daughter eats more vegetables than brown rice, but I just really like the brown rice and it is very satisfying.

Questions Laura; are you using the Italian, riz rond complet, or are you having California or Louisiana short grain brown sent over? Have you discovered any other varieties over here? I am not very fond of the long grain brown available here.

I was having the US brown rice sent over (5 - 6 pounds at a time, pricey) until I discovered the Italian variety. I can tell very little difference other than the Italian variety has slightly smaller grains.

I have loved short grain brown rice since the 60s. Good nutritious stuff. It is the only rice I ever prepare at home.
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
Rabelais said:
Laura said:
My daughter eats more vegetables than brown rice, but I just really like the brown rice and it is very satisfying.

Questions Laura; are you using the Italian, riz rond complet, or are you having California or Louisiana short grain brown sent over? Have you discovered any other varieties over here? I am not very fond of the long grain brown available here.

I was having the US brown rice sent over (5 - 6 pounds at a time, pricey) until I discovered the Italian variety. I can tell very little difference other than the Italian variety has slightly smaller grains.

I have loved short grain brown rice since the 60s. Good nutritious stuff. It is the only rice I ever prepare at home.



Hubby found this source for different kinds of rice about a year ago: http://importfood.com/noodlesrice.html

The black rice is excellent! I bought him one of their heavy stone morter and pestles. They also carry stainless steel stackable lunch boxes, and other cool cooking tools.



Gimpy
 

Nienna

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FOTCM Member
Xman said:
"almond milk, oat milk, rice milk" - these aren't really milks. They are drinkable liquids made from almond, oat, rice with water base. They have no dairy and are not even related to real milk.

Hi Xman,

Yep, this I am aware of. But my question is if it is necessary to have some type of milk while doing the detox. Is there some nutritional ingredient that would make it necessary, or is it just for the flavoring?

I tried the rice milk and, what can I say, I just don't like milk in any form. Not that I didn't used to use milk years ago, but I have just developed a dislike for it. Not that I probably couldn't develop a like for it if I needed to. ;)

So I was basically just wondering if there is a nutritional need for it. But thanks for answering. :)
 

christx11

Jedi Master
Nienna Eluch said:
Xman said:
"almond milk, oat milk, rice milk" - these aren't really milks. They are drinkable liquids made from almond, oat, rice with water base. They have no dairy and are not even related to real milk.

Hi Xman,

Yep, this I am aware of. But my question is if it is necessary to have some type of milk while doing the detox. Is there some nutritional ingredient that would make it necessary, or is it just for the flavoring?

I tried the rice milk and, what can I say, I just don't like milk in any form. Not that I didn't used to use milk years ago, but I have just developed a dislike for it. Not that I probably couldn't develop a like for it if I needed to. ;)

So I was basically just wondering if there is a nutritional need for it. But thanks for answering. :)

I don't think the liquids are needed for their nutritional aspects. It is just that you need a lot of liquid for making all those shakes. If water works for you that would probably be great - (distilled water probably though - someone can correct me if I am wrong). I can't think of any other liquids you could use - juices are out.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Take probiotics first. Get a good one, enteric coated. Take one or two.

Then make Shake consisting of:
Berries (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, mix, etc. I buy them
frozen and keep a variety in the freezer. You can use them frozen or warmed
up. I warm mine up in the nuker.)

Sorry, just a couple of questions:

-Doesn't the microwaves destroy some important aspects (enzymes?) of the berries? Or is this just an urban legend...? I've been told e.g. not to warm the milk for our baby in the microwave because the nutrition value decreases by doing this.

-I noticed that psyllium husk is no longer included in the "morning cocktail" - why is that?

- Does anyone know if it makes any difference how much before (eating) you take the probiotics? Some manufacturers recommend taking it 1/2h before - maybe because the capsule will melt more efficiently...?

I've been having a slightly modified version of the morning cocktail recommended by Laura now for ca two weeks. Couldn't yet afford the flax seed oil (it's very expensive over here in Finland), I guess it would be worth adding to the mix though? I've also added a few scoops of whey protein; I'm experimenting on basis of my earlier posts about whey protein increasing glutathione levels. BTW, hate to ask you this, but I'm curious - are you sure that the kind of glutathione supplement you're using heightens the levels in the body? Quoting one research:
Because of hydrolysis of glutathione by intestinal and hepatic gamma-glutamyltransferase, dietary glutathione is not a major determinant of circulating glutathione, and it is not possible to increase circulating glutathione to a clinically beneficial extent by the oral administration of a single dose of 3 g of glutathione (Witschi A, Reddy S, Stofer B, Lauterburg BH (1992). _http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1362956

BTW, I've been using berries called 'lingonberry', see _http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingonberry Lingonberries have lots of vitamins, but most interestingly the berry has strong antibacterial qualities (Kontiokari & Sundqvist, 2001) _http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11431298?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus

It's too early to tell any effects yet, but I do feel more energetic all ready. Plus, I'm having some of the usual detox symptoms like irritation and muscle aches. And strangely, I don't feel as hungry as earlier - I eat much less. Is this typical...?
 

Pierre

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Aragorn said:
Doesn't the microwaves destroy some important aspects (enzymes?) of the berries? Or is this just an urban legend...? I've been told e.g. not to warm the milk for our baby in the microwave because the nutrition value decreases by doing this.

I put directly the frozen berries in the blender with vegetal milk (without sugar), stevia and some supplements. It's delicious.

I don't know to what extend microwaves affect food's nutritional properties, microwave heating is mentioned once in the transcripts :

950526 said:
Q: (L) Is microwaved food harmful to the person who consumes it?
A: Not much.
 

Mrs. Peel

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
aragorn said:
Take probiotics first. Get a good one, enteric coated. Take one or two.

Then make Shake consisting of:
Berries (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, mix, etc. I buy them
frozen and keep a variety in the freezer. You can use them frozen or warmed
up. I warm mine up in the nuker.)

-I noticed that psyllium husk is no longer included in the "morning cocktail" - why is that?

All I know is my own experience. I made the shake right before I left for work, and poured it into an insulated mug and took it with me to drink at my desk. By the time I got there and got settled, a half hour had passed, and the psyllium had expanded and turned the shake into a mess of gunk. :(
 

Laura

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Aragorn, please DO get and read the books: "Detoxify or Die" and "The Magnesium Miracle" for sure. Good additions would be "You are What You Ate" and "The Fat Resistance Diet" (even if you are not fat!)

You may be defeating the purpose by adding anything "wheat" based at all. Wheat is one of the most evil things ever invented. Do a search on sott for "wheat" "gluten" "celiac" etc, and read some of the research we have found on the topic.

Re: Flax oil: you can often get it from a livestock supply place much cheaper. We buy a big bottle that is intended as a supplement for horses! It's just a little stronger than the very refined version sold for human consumption.

Rogers says that you can use cod liver oil in place of Flax oil and that it is even better. So if cod-liver oil is easily and cheaply available, get that instead.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thank you for the tip Laura.

I've been planning to buy the book by Sherry Rogers - now I'm making it top of my list! There's some reports of it being out of stock...?

About the "wheat protein"; sorry my mistake I meant to write whey protein. Do you (or the writers mentioned) think whey is problematic too? Anyway, my wife also thinks that I'm always too eager to take any kind of "new" supplements I think will make me "healthier". So there's some truth in what you say :-[
 

annp

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I have been attempting to follow the paleo diet (with varying success as it is difficult). See www.paleodiet.com
There are two links on the page which discuss lectins.

"Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in most plants, especially seeds and tubers like cereals, potatoes, and beans. Until recently their main use was as histology and blood transfusion reagents, but in the past two decades we have realised that many lectins are (a) toxic, inflammatory, or both; (b) resistant to cooking and digestive enzymes; and (c) present in much of our food.2 It is thus no surprise that they sometimes cause "food poisoning." But the really disturbing finding came with the discovery in 1989 that some food lectins get past the gut wall and deposit themselves in distant organs" (From http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/318/7190/1023).


Because of this, I have avoided eating any type of beans/ peas but am finding that this makes the paleo diet even more restrictive and am getting tired of such a limiting diet. I have also been avoiding peanuts and cashews as they are considered legumes rather than nuts and contain a high degree of micotoxins as well.

So - I was curious that the macrobiotic diet does not appear to exclude beans.

It gets to be a real challenge navigating the numerous dietary plans - there is so much disagreement even within the same general plans and I realize everyone has to find the right individual plan - but what the research can drive one in circles. :rolleyes:
 

Aiming

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Did the forum search which returned no results:
What about ghee (for cooking)?? Ghee is clarified butter (of course it's best to use organic butter to make ghee),
with the harmful substances removed,
and according to ayurveda it helps in removing toxins from the body.
It can be consumed even with dairy intolerance, because the lactose is removed.

There's a whole lot to be found on the web about ghee, some sources however do not at all
mention any health benefits, some dismiss ghee as beneficial at all, so I'm not sure about its actual significance.
In my own experience, ghee brings about detox symptoms like headaches and the need to drink
more water, as if to flush out the toxins that have been drawn to the surface.

Laura, apart from using olive oil, you've mentioned cooking vegetables with butter (if I correctly recall).
Have you tried ghee or know about its true significance?

Does anybody else know?
 
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