'Brexit' wins, UK to leave the EU?

angelburst29

The Living Force
Theresa May is stepping down as British prime minister on June 7th ... Who will replace her?

UK's May hangs on after Brexit gambit backfires
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves Downing Street in London, Britain, January 15, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls/File Photo

Prime Minister Theresa May was clinging to power on Thursday after her final Brexit gambit backfired, overshadowing a European election that has shown a United Kingdom still riven over its divorce from the EU.

Brexit crisis: Minister quits, piling pressure on Britain's May
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at the House of Commons in London, Britain May 22, 2019. ©UK Parliament/Mark Duffy/Handout via REUTERS

Prominent Brexit supporter Andrea Leadsom resigned from Prime Minister Theresa May's government on Wednesday, piling pressure on the British leader after a new Brexit gambit backfired and fueled calls for her to quit.

Tearful Theresa May resigns, paving way for Brexit confrontation with EU
British Prime Minister Theresa May reacts as she delivers a statement in London, Britain, May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Fighting back tears, Theresa May said on Friday she would quit, setting up a contest that will bring a new British prime minister to power who could pursue a cleaner break with the European Union.

Choking back tears, Britain's May says goodbye to Downing Street
British Prime Minister Theresa May reacts as she delivers a statement in London, Britain, May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Simon Dawson

British Prime Minister Theresa May was barely able to finish her resignation speech on Friday, her voice breaking as she fought back tears when describing her "enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love".

Britain's May says she will step down on June 7
Prime Minister Theresa May said on Friday she would step down on June 7, succumbing to calls in her governing Conservative Party to make way for a new leader to try to break an impasse over Britain's departure from the European Union.

EU holds ground on Brexit after PM May announces resignation: Commission
British Prime Minister Theresa May meets with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in Strasbourg, France March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler/Pool
The European Union's position on the terms of Britain's exit from the bloc has not changed despite British Prime Minister Theresa May announcing her June 7 resignation earlier on Friday, Commission spokeswoman Mina Andreeva said.

Who wants to be Britain's next prime minister?
Former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson speaks in Parliament in London, Britain, March 12, 2019, in this screen grab taken from video. Reuters TV via REUTERS

British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Friday she would quit, triggering a contest next month that will bring a new leader to power who is likely to push for a cleaner break with the European Union.

Brexit Party leader Farage says PM May misjudged mood of Britain
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage leaves a polling station after voting in the European elections, in Biggin Hill, Britain, May 23, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Nigel Farage, one of the faces of Britain's Brexit campaign, said Prime Minister Theresa May had misjudged the mood of the country, after she resigned on Friday.

Man charged with throwing a milkshake at Brexit Party's Farage
Brexit Party leader Nigel gestures after being hit with a milkshake while arriving for a Brexit Party campaign event in Newcastle, Britain, May 20, 2019. REUTERS/Scott Heppell

A man has been charged with common assault and criminal damage after a milkshake was thrown over Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain's Brexit Party, police said on Tuesday.

French minister warns of "toxic" Nigel Farage poll win, urges speedy Brexit
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage gestures as he arrives to attend a Brexit Party campaign event in Newcastle, Britain, May 20, 2019. REUTERS/Scott Heppell

Victory for veteran British anti-EU campaigner Nigel Farage in this week's European Parliament election will create a big headache for the European Union and the UK should exit the bloc as soon as possible, France's finance minister said on Tuesday.

Brexit shifts politics in Ireland as parties look north
Former SDLP leader Mark Durkan, now running as a Fine Gael candidate contesting the Dublin constituency for the European Parliament elections, canvasses for votes in Dublin, Ireland, May 20, 2019. Picture taken May 20, 2019. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne

When Britain voted to leave the European Union, few voters outside Northern Ireland thought about what it would mean for the British province.

UK's Hammond warns of hit to economy from a no-deal Brexit
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond is seen outside Downing Street, as uncertainty over Brexit continues, in London, Britain May 21, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

British finance minister Philip Hammond said a no-deal Brexit would leave the country poorer, repeating his warnings to potential successors of Prime Minister Theresa May, some of whom have advocated an abrupt departure from the European Union.

UK Labour lawmakers unlikely to back May's Brexit deal: McDonnell
Britain's Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer John McDonnell of Labour Party is seen outside the Cabinet Office, as uncertainty over Brexit continues, in London, Britain April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

Lawmakers from Britain's opposition Labour Party are unlikely to be persuaded to back Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal when she puts it to a vote in parliament next month, the party's finance chief John McDonnell said on Tuesday.

Factbox: What would a UK Labour Party government nationalize, and how?
Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks at the launch of Labour's European election campaign in Kent, Britain, May 9, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Britain's opposition Labour Party wants to nationalize energy and water infrastructure if it can oust Prime Minister Theresa May's ruling Conservatives from power, reversing decades of pro-privatization public policy.

"Fatal flaws" remain in British PM's new Brexit deal: DUP
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) deputy leader Nigel Dodds, speaks to the media outside the Cabinet Office, in London, Britain March 15, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

The "fatal flaws" of the draft Brexit treaty agreed with the European Union remain despite British Prime Minister Theresa May seeking to set out a new deal on Tuesday, the Northern Irish party propping up her government said.

UK government wants to settle second Brexit vote, customs issues quickly: spokesman
British Prime Minister Theresa May's government wants to resolve swiftly the issues of whether to hold a second Brexit referendum and what type of post-Brexit customs relationship to have, May's political spokesman said on Tuesday .

UK lawmakers can determine type of Brexit by amending law: minister
Lawmakers will be able to determine the shape of Britain's exit from the European Union by amending the government's Brexit legislation in parliament, trade minister Liam Fox will say on Tuesday.

UK opposition Labour Party will not back PM May's Brexit deal
Britain's main opposition Labour Party said it will not support Prime Minister Theresa's May latest attempt to secure Brexit after she offered sweeteners in her fourth attempt to break the parliamentary impasse and pass her negotiated deal with the EU.

New UK PM may be needed to deliver Brexit: Northern Irish DUP's Dodds
Deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist Party Nigel Dodds is seen outside the Houses of Parliament, as uncertainty over Brexit continues, in London, Britain April 8, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

The deputy leader of the Northern Irish party propping up British Prime Minister Theresa May's government said on Tuesday he thought Brexit would be delivered, but that it might require a new prime minister to do so.

UK must not 'export its political crisis' to Europe: French politician Loiseau
FILE PHOTO:  The Houses of Parliament are seen through a European Union flag as demonstrators arrive  in Parliament Square during the anti-Brexit 'People's March for Europe', in central London, Britain September 9, 2017.   REUTERS/Tolga Akmen

Britain must not "export its political crisis" over to Europe, said French politician Nathalie Loiseau, who is spearheading President Emmanuel Macron's European election campaign.
 

sToRmR1dR

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Theresa May is stepping down as British prime minister on June 7th ... Who will replace her?

Tearful Theresa May resigns, paving way for Brexit confrontation with EU
30326
Fighting back tears, Theresa May said on Friday she would quit, setting up a contest that will bring a new British prime minister to power who could pursue a cleaner break with the European Union.

Choking back tears, Britain's May says goodbye to Downing Street
30327
British Prime Minister Theresa May was barely able to finish her resignation speech on Friday, her voice breaking as she fought back tears when describing her "enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love".


Dry Your Tears May
By Jon Gaunt - 24.05.2019

Twitter Erupts With Meme Mania Over Prime Minister Theresa May's Resignation
24.05.2019

A 'Game of Thrones': What Happens To Brexit After PM May Leaves No 10?
24.05.2019
 

Ursus Minor

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Brexit (and the Yellow Vests movement as well) - is it a modern day "Peasants' Revolt"?

From an article by Jeff Thomas (on "International Man")

In fourteenth century England, the cost of ongoing warfare placed politicians in a situation in which they either had to concede the war, cut their own emoluments, or increase taxation significantly. As politicians always do, they chose the latter.

Revenue from the resultant poll tax proved to be less than anticipated, as large numbers of people found ways to evade the tax. The tax commissioners were then given wide latitude in the methods they chose to facilitate collection.

As is almost always the case, whenever authorities are given too much latitude, they use it abusively.

In May of 1381, the authorities confronted the people of Brentwood, Essex. The people were unanimous in their anger toward the authorities, as they already considered the tax to be an abuse of authority. In a confrontation attended by hundreds of citizens, a shop owner, Thomas Baker, announced to the commissioner, “All of these folk have already paid their taxes. You won’t get a penny more from them.”

The commissioner then ordered the arrest of one hundred people chosen at random. But outnumbered, the authorities were driven back. Reinforcements were brought in the next day. But by this time, more peasants had joined the previous day’s group, and armed conflict ensued.

Six of the authorities were beheaded. At this point, there was no turning back. The peasants had a taste of freedom and would not give it up easily...

➡ Read full article
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
This is truly - an ungodly amount of money! Are these payments - what props up and runs the European Union? And Britain is only one Country? Where does all this money go, what is it used for? What does Johnson mean by "outstanding British liabilities"?

UK’s Johnson threatens to withhold $50 billion Brexit payment
FILE PHOTO: Former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson gives a speech at the JCB Headquarters in Rocester, Staffordshire, Britain, January 18, 2019. REUTERS/Andrew Yates/File Photo

FILE PHOTO: Former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson gives a speech at the JCB Headquarters in Rocester, Staffordshire, Britain, January 18, 2019. REUTERS/Andrew Yates/File Photo

The EU has repeatedly said it will not reopen discussion of the Brexit transition deal it reached with May last year, which British lawmakers have rejected three times, prompting May to announce her resignation earlier this month.

Britain is due to leave the EU on Oct. 31. If Parliament does not approve a deal - and the government does not ask the EU for another delay - there risks being major economic disruption from a disorderly departure.

The 39 Billion pounds represents outstanding British liabilities to the EU, which would be paid over a number of years, according to the withdrawal agreement negotiated by May.

Favorite Johnson pledges tax cut as race to succeed PM May officially starts
Boris Johnson promised tax cuts for higher earners if he becomes Britain's next prime minister as the crowded race to replace Theresa May officially begins on Monday in the shadow of Brexit turmoil.

Johnson baulks at Brexit cost as leadership race hots up
Boris Johnson, the favourite to succeed Theresa May as Britain's prime minister, said on Sunday he would withhold payment of the country's European Union exit bill to try and get a better deal - a move that drew an immediate rebuke from France.

UK PM candidate Hunt says: EU will do a new Brexit deal with me
Britain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt speaks during the launch of his campaign for the Conservative Party leadership, in London, Britain June 10, 2019.  REUTERS/Simon Dawson

Jeremy Hunt, one of the leading candidates vying to succeed Prime Minister Theresa May, said he would leave the European Union without a deal but with a heavy heart and that he hoped the bloc would engage with a new British leader.

Factbox: Beyond Brexit, what are UK leadership candidates' priorities?
British Conservative lawmakers are lining up to replace outgoing Prime Minister Theresa May, taking on the task of delivering Brexit and healing a country still deeply split over its relationship with the European Union.

PM candidate Hancock says he would not allow parliament to be suspended for Brexit
Health Secretary Matt Hancock speaks at the launch of his bid for leadership of the Conservative Party in London, Britain June 10, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

British health minister Matt Hancock, one of the candidates to replace prime minister Theresa May as prime minister, said he would not allow parliament to be suspended to allow Brexit to occur on Oct. 31 as other leadership hopefuls have suggested.

A Brexit deal is my priority, says PM hopeful Javid
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Home Secretary Sajid Javid is seen outside Downing Street in London, England, May 21, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah Mckay/File Photo

Britain's interior minister Sajid Javid, a contender to replace Theresa May, said on Monday if he was prime minister he would pursue a deal to leave the European Union and would offer to pay any new costs to keep the border open with Ireland.

UK PM candidate Javid offers to pay for Brexit border solution
Sajid Javid, a candidate to be Britain's next prime minister, said on Sunday he would offer to cover the cost of finding a post-Brexit border solution with Ireland - something he said would unlock fresh negotiations with the European Union.

PM candidate Leadsom: I am proposing a 'managed' Brexit
FILE PHOTO: Andrea Leadsom MP, former Leader of the House of Commons appears on BBC TV's The Andrew Marr Show in London, Britain, June 2, 2019. Jeff Overs/BBC/Handout via REUTERS

Andrea Leadsom, one of the candidates vying for Prime Minister Theresa May's job, said she would seek a "managed exit" from the European Union on Oct. 31.

UK's Amber Rudd backing Jeremy Hunt in PM succession race: tweet
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt speaks during a joint news conference with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the Foreign Office in central London, Britain May 8, 2019. Mandel Ngan/Pool via REUTERS/File Photo

UK Work and Pensions Minister Amber Rudd said on Sunday she would support Jeremy Hunt in the race to be the next prime minister.

UK PM candidate Hunt says Brexit deal is only way to avoid an election
The only way Britain can avoid a national election is to leave the European Union with a deal, Jeremy Hunt, a candidate to be the country's next prime minister, said on Sunday.

UK not paying Brexit bill would be debt default, French source says (How MUCH does France pay the EU?)
FILE PHOTO: British and EU flags flutter outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, January 15, 2019. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
A source close to French President Emmanuel Macron said on Sunday that failing to pay a 39 billion pound ($50 billion) Brexit bill when Britain leaves the European Union would amount to a sovereign debt default.

UK PM candidate Gove open to short Brexit delay if deal is close
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Michael Gove is seen outside the Cabinet Office in London, Britain May 14, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

Michael Gove, a candidate to replace British Prime Minister Theresa May, said he would be prepared to delay Brexit for a few days or weeks beyond the current exit date of Oct. 31, if Britain was close to signing an exit deal with the European Union.

UK PM candidate Gove admits taking cocaine
FILE PHOTO - Britain's Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Michael Gove, who is running to succeed Theresa May as Prime Minister, leaves his home in London, Britain, May 28, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

Michael Gove, a leading contender to replace British Prime Minister Theresa May, said he had used cocaine and has "deep regrets" about taking the drug on several occasions.
 

DianaRose94

Jedi Master
Whelp, Boris Johnson is PM of the UK. It's impressive that someone as stupid and incompetent as him could make it that far. It's like a sad comedy. I wonder where do we go from here?
 

seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Whelp, Boris Johnson is PM of the UK. It's impressive that someone as stupid and incompetent as him could make it that far. It's like a sad comedy. I wonder where do we go from here?
We have lot of world leaders who behave like jokers say things that looks strange. Here is one from Bojo.
I guess it is the indication of times.
 

Mike

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Whelp, Boris Johnson is PM of the UK. It's impressive that someone as stupid and incompetent as him could make it that far. It's like a sad comedy. I wonder where do we go from here?

'Mother Nature' connected to the people of the UK reacting to BoJo (the clown) taking the reins as the PM or something else connected to that in some way? Couldn't help but notice they coincided.


 

Palinurus

The Living Force
Source (Dutch only): Boris Johnson: clown wordt kamikaze

DeepL Translator said:
Boris Johnson: Clown becomes kamikaze

Opinion

Luuk van Middelaar 25 July 2019 at 17:34

middelaar-luuk-van-online-artikel.png

Luuk van Middelaar is a political philosopher,
historian and professor of European law (Leiden)

Everything indicates that Boris Johnson is heading for a chaotic British departure from the EU. His new government is full of radical Brexiteers. All have had to agree to the scenario of a No Deal on 31 October. Conservatives who want to save the country such a disaster, such as May's finance minister Philip Hammond, are disappearing to the parliamentary back benches. While the policy announcements in Johnson's Downing-street-10 speech on Wednesday sounded like a hodgepodge of safe streets and more hospital beds, a rhetorical connoisseur in The Times [behind paywall with free trial] heard how in particular the No Deal passage was extremely polished. That's what it's all about.

Johnson claims he will disprove "the doubters, doomsayers and pessimists" with a 99-day divorce agreement with the EU. This is a pure bluff. EU leaders are not going to reopen the deal they made with May. Chancellor Merkel and President Macron do not want to give a man known as a clown, charlatan and liar what they could not offer his stubborn but decent predecessor. They're not going to 'throw Ireland before an omnibus' by taking the backstop out of the deal, the very insurance policy against a hard border at the island of Ireland. As the relative cost of a chaotic divorce is four times higher for the UK than for the EU-27, an atmosphere is created like: if he wants to shoot himself in the foot, so be it.

To avoid this outcome, EU leaders are prepared to do two things: a new political declaration about the 'future relationship' (insufficient for the Brexit radicals) and a later deadline. Although Johnson wants to see his country to have left by 31 October, the British Parliament may be able to block a No Deal departure. However, this setback would create a favorable situation for Johnson: he will ask the EU for a time extension and proclaim early elections. These will de facto be a second referendum with the slogan 'No Deal or Stay' as a starting point. Johnson would be able to unite the English nationalist Right with the No Deal promise: the Tory-Leavers plus Nigel Farage's Brexit party. On the other side, there are the LibDems (also a refuge for Tory-Remainers) and Labour (under Jeremy Corbyn very unstable about Europe). Exciting, but the kamikazes will win. Johnson is the country's best campaigner, he will winch up the national pride and open up the money tap, while the economic costs of Brexit - again postponed in this scenario - remain still virtual. This earns him an electoral mandate of, in principle, five years.

In a brilliant portrait in the New York Review of Books, Fintan O'Toole writes how much Johnson's "self-confident political theatricality" is in keeping with England's deepest desire particularly not to be serious. As a young Brussels correspondent (1989-1994), who grossed up in fake stories, Johnson translated this Monty-Python ambience into journalism, with the EU as a gigantic Ministry Of Silly Walks. His readers were presented with the Ministry of Dangerous Balloons and the Ministry of Small Condoms or - last week's final act in the leadership campaign - the Ministry of Ice-packed Buckling. The fact that such ice has to be added to fish sent by post, not because of EU stupidity but because of British regulations, is irrelevant. What matters is the laugh. And also the disdain for those who do not understand the joke, the favorite Oxford form of exclusion.

The end of the Brexit as a joke is fast approaching. But unfortunately only the pain of real departure can break the spell. Careful with a delay then. The black-pointing about a crash will be hard. But Boris should not be given the opportunity by the EU to campaign outside reality again as a clown. It would be better if, next time, he were to approach the British electorate as the irresponsible kamikaze he actually is.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator
 

SlipNet

Dagobah Resident
Well it's all kicked off today. The Scottish Tory leader has quit her post, and Boris has prorogued parliament in an effort to ensure a hard Brexit. I was a Brexiteer from the start (EU control? Forget it!), but with Johnson at the wheel I feel like a mad person in a fairground. Well, on October 31st the sirens will call.


Rebel MPs from across the political spectrum are gearing up for a historic parliamentary clash next week, after Boris Johnson announced plans to suspend parliament for a critical five-week period in the run-up to Brexit.
Tory and opposition MPs took part in a series of hastily convened conference calls on Wednesday in a last-ditch effort to prevent a no-deal outcome, after the prime minister confirmed he had obtained permission from the Queen to prorogue parliament.
The surprise decision provoked widespread fury, with Commons Speaker John Bercow describing it as a “constitutional outrage”.
Robert Kerslake, the former head of the civil service, said Whitehall would have to think carefully about whether to put ministers’ instructions into effect. “We are reaching the point where the civil service must consider putting its stewardship of the country ahead of service to the government of the day,” he said.
In a letter to MPs, Johnson insisted the suspension would allow him to focus on his domestic priorities of funding the NHS and tackling violent crime, and parliament would have “ample” time to debate Brexit – but it was widely seen as a bid to curtail MPs’ chances to bind his hands.
The cross-party rebel alliance agreed to focus on fast-tracking legislation aimed at mandating the prime minister to request an extension to article 50 if he fails to strike a new Brexit deal by mid-October.
Play Video
1:50
Boris Johnson confirms plan to suspend UK parliament – video
The fresh scramble to prevent a no-deal Brexit came on a day of extraordinary drama, as:
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• The leader of the House of Commons, Jacob Rees-Mogg, flew to Balmoral to receive the Queen’s formal approval for the prorogation plan at a meeting of the privy council.
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• Sterling tumbled by more than 1 cent against the US dollar, as investors interpreted Johnson’s ploy as heightening the risks of a no-deal Brexit, before rallying later in the day to close 0.5 cents down.
• Senior EU figures were taken aback, with the European parliament’s Brexit coordinator, Guy Verhofstadt, calling the move, “sinister”.
A petition against the suspension of parliament rapidly exceeded 800,000 signatures.
Jeremy Corbyn protested against the move in a letter to the Queen.
Parliament will now sit for little more than a week from 3 September, before breaking until 14 October, when a new Queen’s speech will be held setting out what Johnson called “a bold and ambitious domestic legislative agenda for the renewal of our country after Brexit”.
In practice, given MPs do not sit on most Fridays, they are only likely to lose between four and six sitting days in parliament. MPs would have been due to hold conference recess anyway, from 12 September until 7 October.
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Nationwide protests as Boris Johnson suspends parliament – video
But Johnson’s gambit squeezes the time available for rebel MPs to act. Their numbers have been boosted by the sackings of key members of the “Gaukeward squad”, including former chancellor Philip Hammond, who is expected to spearhead next week’s efforts.
“At a time of national crisis parliament must be able to meet to hold the government to account and to represent our constituents and it is profoundly undemocratic to shut parliament down to stop it doing its job,” Hammond said.
“We are determined parliament will show its resolve to stop a no-deal Brexit … We will have to try to do something when parliament returns next week.”
He could table a vote of no-confidence in Johnson’s government; but Labour have repeatedly said they would not do so unless they were convinced of success – which is deemed unlikely while potential Tory rebels are focused on blocking no deal through legislation.
Donald Trump waded into the row on Wednesday, fresh from showering praise on Johnson at the G7 summit in Biarritz over the weekend. The US president claimed it would be “very hard” for Corbyn to win a no-confidence vote, because Johnson was “exactly what the UK has been looking for”.

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1166706175003545600

Would be very hard for Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of Britain’s Labour Party, to seek a no-confidence vote against New Prime Minister Boris Johnson, especially in light of the fact that Boris is exactly what the U.K. has been looking for, & will prove to be “a great one!” Love U.K.

62.5K

2:36 PM - Aug 28, 2019
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One senior Labour figure speculated that Johnson’s rationale might be to show that he had been forced into a general election. “Buckle up, summer’s over,” he said.
But Downing Street insists Johnson is focused on getting a new deal with the EU; and is determined not to go to the polls before Brexit day, even if he loses a vote of no confidence.
“We have been very clear that if there’s a no-confidence vote, he won’t resign. We get to set an election date. We don’t want an election, but if we have to set a date, it’s going to be after 31 October,” said a senior government source.
The first hint that something was afoot came when the chancellor, Sajid Javid, cancelled a major speech planned for Wednesday, announcing instead that a slimmed-down spending review will take place next week.
Johnson’s cabinet, which is packed with veterans of the Vote Leave campaign, were only informed of the prime minister’s decision to suspend parliament in a conference call on Wednesday morning – after Johnson had already made a request to the Queen.

It is blindingly obvious that the purpose of prorogation now would be to stop parliament debating Brexit
Speaker John Bercow
Downing Street insisted this had been the standard approach to planning a Queen’s speech for previous governments.
During the conference call, the prime minister stuck resolutely to the line that the suspension was simply aimed at paving the way for his new government to press on with its domestic agenda.
No dissent was expressed, the Guardian understands – though one senior Tory source said Amber Rudd was “more reserved” than others. They described the culture secretary, Nicky Morgan, as “enthusiastic as Andrea Leadsom” in supporting the plan.
The health secretary, Matt Hancock, faced ridicule on Twitter, with his letter to fellow candidates during the Tory leadership contest calling on them to rule out prorogation being widely shared.
Hancock warned in the letter that “a policy on Brexit to prorogue parliament would mean the end of the Conservative party as a serious party of government”.
Allies said he had been referring to the more drastic proposal of proroguing parliament through to exit day – and believes narrowing the window in which MPs can debate and vote on an improved Brexit deal could help it to pass, by sharpening the dilemma for MPs.
Play Video
1:41
‘This is a dictatorship’: politicians react to Boris Johnson’s plan to suspend parliament – video
The rebels’ plan for averting a no-deal Brexit leans heavily on Bercow’s assistance.
In an extraordinary intervention for the Speaker, whose role demands political neutrality, Bercow said Johnson’s move was a “constitutional outrage”.
“However it is dressed up, it is blindingly obvious that the purpose of prorogation now would be to stop parliament debating Brexit and performing its duty in shaping a course for the country,” he said.
“I have had no contact from the government, but if the reports that it is seeking to prorogue parliament are confirmed, this move represents a constitutional outrage.”
The rebels believe Bercow, who is often accused of trying to thwart Brexit by eurosceptic MPs, will grant a request for an emergency backbench debate – known as an SO24 – on the the first day Parliament returns, 3 September.
An amendable motion could then be voted on in a matter of days. If successful it would pass to the Lords who would be required to sit in emergency sessions over the weekend of 7 and 8 September. It must have received royal assent before parliament is prorogued, or the Commons would have to start again from scratch when parliament returns on 14 October.
One former Conservative cabinet minister suggested a key rationale for the government’s approach was that, by convention, the Queen’s speech is debated for six days – clogging up the timetable to prevent wrecking manoeuvres.
“They have worked through the options and decided this is their only reasonably safe option for delivery on 31 October,” he said.
Johnson said MPs would get the opportunity to vote on the outcome of the key 17 October European council meeting, at which he hopes a new Brexit deal will be agreed, during the following week, on 21 and 22 October – little more than a week before exit day.
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
Instant View: UK's Johnson plan to restrict parliamentary time before Brexit
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves a news conference at the end of the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, August 26, 2019. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

Britain's Boris Johnson will limit lawmakers' opportunities to derail his plans for Brexit by restricting the amount of time they are due to sit in parliament before the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.

UK PM Johnson's parliament suspension plan a 'constitutional outrage': speaker
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a news conference at the end of the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, August 26, 2019. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

Prime Minister Boris Johnson's plan to extend the period during which parliament does not normally sit is a "constitutional outrage" designed to stop lawmakers debating Brexit, speaker of the lower house John Bercow was quoted as saying by the BBC.

Queen Elizabeth approves British parliament suspension
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Queen Elizabeth II attends a special exhibition celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria which marks this year's Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace in London, Britain, July 17, 2019. Victoria Jones/Pool via REUTERS/File Photo

Britain's Queen Elizabeth has approved Prime Minister Boris Johnson's plan to suspend parliament, a statement from the official body of advisers to the Queen, known as the Privy Council, said on Wednesday.

UK's Johnson says will schedule Queens Speech for Oct. 14
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday he would schedule a Queen's Speech for Oct. 14 in order to launch new legislation and he denied he was seeking to prevent parliament from obstructing his Brexit plans.

Explainer: What is a Queen's Speech and why has UK PM Johnson called one?
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Queen Elizabeth delivers the Queen's Speech during the State Opening of Parliament in central London, Britain June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool/File Photo
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is calling a Queen's Speech for Oct. 14, a move his opponents say is an attempt to limit opposition to Brexit weeks before the country is due to leave the European Union.

UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension
FILE PHOTO: Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home in London, Britain August 27, 2019.  REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

The leader of the opposition Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn has written to Queen Elizabeth to express grave concern about Prime Minister Boris Johnson's plan to suspend parliament until Oct. 14th, a party source said on Wednesday.

UK opposition leader Corbyn asks to meet queen over Brexit: Guardian
FILE PHOTO: Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home in London, Britain August 27, 2019.  REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

British opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn has asked to meet Queen Elizabeth to raise his concerns about Prime Minister Boris Johnson's plans to suspend parliament for longer than normal before Brexit, the Guardian newspaper said.

British PM to suspend parliament before Brexit, opposition denounces 'coup'
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a news conference at the end of the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, August 26, 2019. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez
Prime Minister Boris Johnson will suspend Britain's parliament for more than a month before Brexit, enraging opponents and raising the stakes in the country's most serious political crisis in decades.

UK petition to stop parliament suspension exceeds 450,000 signatures
Anti- Brexit protestors hold placards outside Downing Street in London, Britain August 28, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholl

A petition opposing Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to suspend parliament for a month in the run-up to the planned Brexit date of Oct. 31 gained more than 450,000 signatures in a matter of hours after Johnson's announcement.

Few Britons back month-long parliament break before Brexit
An anti-Brexit protestor holds a sign outside the Houses of the Parliament in London, Britain August 28, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

Only 27% of British people back the month-long suspension of parliament ordered by Prime Minister Boris Johnson, while 47% are opposed, a snap poll conducted on Wednesday by market research company YouGov showed.

Britain is committed to leaving EU on Oct. 31: UK's Brexit minister
FILE PHOTO: Britain's Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union Stephen Barclay walks at Downing Street in London, Britain, August 13, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

The United Kingdom is committed to leaving the European Union on Oct. 31, said British Brexit minister Stephen Barclay on Wednesday, speaking just hours after UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson moved to limit parliament's ability to derail Brexit.

Trump says hard to target Britain's Johnson with no-confidence vote
FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump returns after travelling to the AMVETS convention in Kentucky, at the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S. August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Tasos Katopodis/File Photo

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that it would be difficult for the leader of Britain's opposition Labour party to bring a no-confidence vote against British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, saying, "Boris is exactly what the U.K. has been looking for."

UK tells France to start no-deal Brexit mitigation talks
FILE PHOTO: Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay signs the commencement agreement to leave the EU, in undisclosed location August 16, 2019,  in this picture obtained from social media. STEVE BARCLAY/via REUTERS

Britain's Brexit minister, Stephen Barclay, is due to say on Wednesday that Britain and France should immediately begin talks about how to minimize the disruption from a no-deal Brexit.

TIMELINE: Key dates in Britain's Brexit crisis
Anti-Brexit protesters hold placards and flags of the European Union outside the Houses of the Parliament in London, Britain August 28, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson wants to renegotiate the terms of the country's divorce from the European Union but whether he succeeds or not, he has pledged that Brexit will happen "do or die" on Oct. 31.
 

Joe

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The Telegraph called the result of the EU referendum vote: MP calls on Jeremy Corbyn to resign and 'make way for someone with the backbone to confront antisemitism' after he appears to compare Israel to 'various self-styled Islamic states and organisations'

If the UK political establishment honors the electorate's vote, Britain will leave the EU without delay.

Just looking at the first post in this topic (above) and laughing at the "without delay" part.

Just in case anyone is confused about the situation:

Brexit for Dummies:

1) *Actually* leave without a deal: not going to happen. Economically impossible. This includes nominally "leaving" under a "hard Brexit" then a multi-year 'withdrawal process' whereby the UK 're-enters' the EU without actually leaving.

2) Leave with agreement: This is essentially Theresa May's deal that was rejected 3 times by Parliament earlier this year. Members from both sides of the House rejected it for different reasons. Labour MPs because it was too 'leavey' and some hard-line Conservative MPs rejected it because it wasn't 'leavey' enough. Some of these Conservative MPs were truly ideologically driven (little Englanders) but most had an eye on staying in power and, pandering to the majority of English citizens that voted to "leave".

Currently, Johnson is attempting to tart up and talk up May's agreement to make it appear to the majority that voted for "Brexit" that it is a 'better deal' that "delivers Brexit", when it actually doesn't and is just May's deal. Chances of this happening are high because: a) a lot of English Brexit voters will believe Johnson's lies, and b) more Conservative MPs will likely approve the deal since the alternative is a general election where Nigel Farage's Brexit party would contest Conservative seats, split the Conservative vote, and possibly allow Jeremy Corbyn to become PM (shock! horror!)

3) Parliament votes for a further "delay" in the Brexit process. Chances of this are low. While Labour MPs will likely attempt to force this outcome with a view to frustrating the Conservative government and the English population and ultimately force a 'no confidence vote' in Johnson's government and a general election. But Conservative MPs fear a general election (and loss of power) more than any possible Brexit outcome and will, in that scenario, vote for Johnson/May's 'deal' which, as described above, is not Brexit.

Either way, it's one big disingenuous shit show.
 
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