Candida- The Silent Epidemic

Laura

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Gertrudes said:
Psyche said:
You can stop when your nystatin finishes. 2 week protocols seems what Dr. Hyman is recommending from his experience. Other practitioners who treat yeast overgrowth had recommended much longer periods (even months). But if you have no significant symptoms, 4 weeks is reasonable.

Oh great! One week to go and I can eat all the sweet potato I want!

Thank you as usual Psyche :flowers:

We've found that once you have done an anti-candida protocol that you really need to be careful for months afterward, limiting carbs to a bare minimum. Instead, eat meat and fats and low carb veggies for a period. Coconut may have too many carbs. The reason is that nystatin only kills the candida in your gut, not any pockets of it that may be living elsewhere in your body.

When I did the whole thing, I did nystatin AND followed this up with a round or two of a systemic candida killer - fluconazole. I also cut back on carbs seriously for some time - several months - afterward. From what I have read, xylitol can also help to kill candida, but you don't want to have too much and you want to be careful how you have it. I have a spoon in my tea. I used to eat it on blinis with cinnamon, but I gave that up too.

Since you didn't really have any serious die-off symptoms, my question would be: why do you think you need to do the anti-candida protocol to begin with? If you just cut back on carbs, use xylitol, take probiotics regularly, a mild "infestation" will probably sort itself out.
 
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Gertrudes

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Laura said:
We've found that once you have done an anti-candida protocol that you really need to be careful for months afterward, limiting carbs to a bare minimum. Instead, eat meat and fats and low carb veggies for a period. Coconut may have too many carbs. The reason is that nystatin only kills the candida in your gut, not any pockets of it that may be living elsewhere in your body.

Yes, that makes sense. Gradually building up so as to prevent another flare up.

Since I barely had any symptoms, I was thinking of going back to my previous diet. Particularly because it was already focused on meat and veggies, mainly low carb veggies, with some high carbs being eaten once in a while in the form of carrots and parsnips, on rare occasions plantains and yams, and more frequently sweet potatoes.

Laura said:
Since you didn't really have any serious die-off symptoms, my question would be: why do you think you need to do the anti-candida protocol to begin with?

I was actually surprised to find out that my symptoms were to be so mild. After reading so many scary accounts I was a little reticent of doing it whilst not on holidays. I didn't want to have symptoms interfering with my work, for which I need to be in good physical condition.
The fact that in the past I had what seemed to be a perfect Candida feeding diet, with ridiculous amounts of daily refined sugar, alcohol abuse, plenty of dairy and an habit of having moldy cheese for breakfast, made me think that I should really go through this. I didn't really know how it felt to have candida overgrowth or whether I had it, so I gave it a go.

I have been thinking about this lately. My reasoning is that I probably did have Candida overgrowth in the past, but the fact I have been on the detox diet for quite a while now might have eased it up. It is definitely balancing my body, that's for sure. My energy levels are consistently high, my mood has improved tremendously, and curiously, I no longer react to what I initially reacted such as fats, nuts and more recently not even coconut oil. And the latest test I did just before the candida diet showed that I'm also no longer reacting to cocoa, something to which I have been sensitive for years!
 
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Gertrudes

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Well, it seems that my fight with Candida won't be over as soon as I thought. I woke up this morning with a few skin rashes, something I've never had before, so I'm putting it down to Candida die off.
I won't be buying Nystatin again because it is too expensive for me at the moment, but have just ordered Caprylic acid and Olive Leaf extract which is more affordable. Will carry on with these for at least one more month, and then see how it goes.
 

aragorn

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Gertrudes said:
Well, it seems that my fight with Candida won't be over as soon as I thought. I woke up this morning with a few skin rashes, something I've never had before, so I'm putting it down to Candida die off.
I won't be buying Nystatin again because it is too expensive for me at the moment, but have just ordered Caprylic acid and Olive Leaf extract which is more affordable. Will carry on with these for at least one more month, and then see how it goes.

Coconut oil is supposedly also a 'Candida killer':

From: _http://www.naturalnews.com/025199.html
Even those who realize their symptoms are linked to candida find conventional drugs are not a permanent or effective solution. Not to mention medical treatments are often accompanied by side effects worse than the original symptoms. It's no wonder candida patients are seeking an alternative natural treatment. And fortunately, coconut oil can provide the answer.

In countries where coconuts are regularly consumed, candida occurrences are surprisingly low, as noted by Dr. Bruce Fife, a strong believer in the healing power of coconut oil. Although many people in these regions live in conditions that typically promote candida overgrowth, they rarely suffer from candida.

This is because coconut oil is high in both lauric acid and caprylic acid, which both have antiviral, antimicrobial and antifungal properties. These components of coconut oil target harmful bacteria but leave friendly bacteria alone, which helps balances the flora in the digestive system. They also kill off excess yeast and other fungal overgrowth in the body. Studies in Iceland and Nigeria show coconut oil is an effective agent for killing off candida yeast.

If you've heard conflicting reports and are concerned about whether or not coconut oil is healthy, keep in mind the natural, unrefined fats in coconut oil are medium-chain saturated fats–the kind that are more easily converted into energy instead of being stored. Adding a moderate amount of coconut oil to your diet should be considered safe. In fact, the saturated fat content in coconut oil makes it an excellent choice for cooking, because the oil is not damaged at high temperatures like other cooking oils.

Be sure not to buy coconut oil that has been hydrogenated. This destroys the beneficial attributes of coconut oil and makes it high in dangerous trans-fatty acids. The best kind of coconut oil is organic virgin coconut oil, which is closest to its natural state and will provide the most health benefits.

Both Dr. William G. Crook and Dr. Bruce Fife suggest working up to consuming about three tablespoons of coconut oil daily. It's best to start with one teaspoon per day and then work up to the full amount. The more severe the candida, the slower you should work up to this number to prevent overwhelming die-off symptoms as excess yeast is killed off. These symptoms are flu-like and include headaches, chills and fatigue. They will normally last about 3-5 days, depending on the severity of your candida.

Adding coconut oil to your diet is not difficult to do. Depending on the brand you buy, coconut oil has a very light flavor suitable for almost any purpose. You can easily substitute coconut oil for butter on toast or cooking oil in recipes. Try adding a tablespoon to coffee, or stir some into your oatmeal.

You can use coconut oil topically if you have a breakout of athlete's foot or yeast rash. Coconut oil can also be used for localized treatment of jock itch and yeast infections. For any topical treatment, apply a small amount of coconut oil to the affected area 3-4 times each day. This treatment is most effective if you are also taking the oil internally.

Bredel, Matthew. (2008) Coconut Oil: Candida Cure.

Crook, William G. (1986) The Yeast Connection, Vintage Books.

Fife, Bruce. (2005) Coconut Cures: Preventing and Treating Common Health Problems with Coconut. Piccadilly Books.
 
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Gertrudes

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Aragorn said:
Coconut oil is supposedly also a 'Candida killer':

Thank you for that information Aragorn. I was aware of the fact that coconut oil which has caprylic acid, the anti fungal I've just ordered, could possibly have an effect in fighting Candida. What you have posted confirms it.

I got an organic coconut oil jar 2 weeks ago and have been including it in my cooking, thankfully I find it delicious.

Today I used citricidal, a gel made of grapefruit seed extract which also has anti fungal properties on my very itchy skin rashes. I might try coconut oil as well.

Edit: corrected grape into grapefruit
 

Ollie

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Gertrudes said:
Aragorn said:
Coconut oil is supposedly also a 'Candida killer':

Thank you for that information Aragorn. I was aware of the fact that coconut oil which has caprylic acid, the anti fungal I've just ordered, could possibly have an effect in fighting Candida. What you have posted confirms it.

I got an organic coconut oil jar 2 weeks ago and have been including it in my cooking, thankfully I find it delicious.

I recommend introducing the organic coconut oil gradually. Whilst I am other than sensitive to organic coconut oil, just recently I started adding it to my cooking, frying with it and testing (eating) a number of seed bar recipes. I suffered what I would say are die off effects, aching in my upper arms, fatigue and finally building up to one day last week when I felt as if I was eliminating all day long - frequent visits to the bathroom to clean me out. It was as if it was picking out the inflammation points. I have since drastically reduced the amount of coconut oil that I eat to stabilize the situation.
 
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Gertrudes

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Trevrizent said:
I recommend introducing the organic coconut oil gradually. Whilst I am other than sensitive to organic coconut oil, just recently I started adding it to my cooking, frying with it and testing (eating) a number of seed bar recipes. I suffered what I would say are die off effects, aching in my upper arms, fatigue and finally building up to one day last week when I felt as if I was eliminating all day long - frequent visits to the bathroom to clean me out. It was as if it was picking out the inflammation points. I have since drastically reduced the amount of coconut oil that I eat to stabilize the situation.

Thank you for the heads up Trevrizent. Do you think that your symptoms might actually be due to an underlying coconut oil sensitivity? I know that there is an article here somewhere about how some people seem to be sensitive to coconut oil. I'll see if I can find it.

Although I haven't taken any anti fungal today to let the die off symptoms (skin rashes) ease up, I felt...trashed today, for the lack of a better word. Initially I thought that it was lack of sleep again, as with the weather changing into Spring it usually affects my sleep. However I felt faint throughout the day, and this is something that I rarely recall feeling. I think that it is another die off symptom. I've already taken 12g of vitamin C with no reactions :O I used to get stomach discomfort after 2gm! Interestingly, I am feeling better after the last dose of vitamin C.

I'm concluding that die off symptoms can appear really late. I wasn't expecting to have a reaction on the 4th week, so this might be a good example to add to the knowledge we are gaining through everyone's experiences on how reactions to the Candida protocol can vary so much.
 
Gertrudes said:
Trevrizent said:
I recommend introducing the organic coconut oil gradually. Whilst I am other than sensitive to organic coconut oil, just recently I started adding it to my cooking, frying with it and testing (eating) a number of seed bar recipes. I suffered what I would say are die off effects, aching in my upper arms, fatigue and finally building up to one day last week when I felt as if I was eliminating all day long - frequent visits to the bathroom to clean me out. It was as if it was picking out the inflammation points. I have since drastically reduced the amount of coconut oil that I eat to stabilize the situation.

Thank you for the heads up Trevrizent. Do you think that your symptoms might actually be due to an underlying coconut oil sensitivity? I know that there is an article here somewhere about how some people seem to be sensitive to coconut oil. I'll see if I can find it.

It can be salicylate sensitivity as mentioned in the SOTT article "Plants Bite Back" courtesy Weston A. Price foundation.
http://www.sott.net/articles/show/224159-Plants-Bit...
 
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Gertrudes

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Gertrudes said:
Thank you for the heads up Trevrizent. Do you think that your symptoms might actually be due to an underlying coconut oil sensitivity? I know that there is an article here somewhere about how some people seem to be sensitive to coconut oil. I'll see if I can fin

I found it. It wasn't an article as I remembered it but a post by dugdeep here. The relevant part is below:

dugdeep said:
Keep in mind that some people just don't react well to coconut oil (myself included). I tried testing it a little while ago and after two days of cooking with it I started having this really stiff and painful muscle tension in my neck. I stopped the oil and it disappeared. Sore muscles seems to be my reaction to foods I'm not tolerating, as that's what happens if I eat nightshades too often. I can have potatoes one day, but if I eat them again soon after I get quite painful muscle soreness. I've just discovered this recently.

Back to coconut oil, I was recently at a talk given by nutritional author Paul Pitchford who works both with western and eastern approaches to nutrition (it was quite fascinating to hear about his methods, bringing in the Chinese medicine approach, which I'm not familiar with). He said in his practice he stopped recommending coconut oil outright as all his patients would get worse on it. He said coconut milk and shredded coconut seemed fine, but using the isolated oil didn't seem to work for anyone. He said the only time it worked was with populations who ate the whole coconut regularly - cooked with the oil as well as using the milk, water or meat on a regular basis; not necessarily at the same meal, though. Perhaps there's something in the isolated oil that needs to be 'deactivated' by what's in the remainder of the coconut. I'm not sure but thought I would bring it up in case you still have issues with it.


broken.english said:
It can be salicylate sensitivity as mentioned in the SOTT article "Plants Bite Back" courtesy Weston A. Price foundation.
http://www.sott.net/articles/show/224159-Plants-Bit...

Thanks broken.english. Will read it later today.
 

Ollie

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broken.english said:
Gertrudes said:
Trevrizent said:
I recommend introducing the organic coconut oil gradually. Whilst I am other than sensitive to organic coconut oil, just recently I started adding it to my cooking, frying with it and testing (eating) a number of seed bar recipes. I suffered what I would say are die off effects, aching in my upper arms, fatigue and finally building up to one day last week when I felt as if I was eliminating all day long - frequent visits to the bathroom to clean me out. It was as if it was picking out the inflammation points. I have since drastically reduced the amount of coconut oil that I eat to stabilize the situation.

Thank you for the heads up Trevrizent. Do you think that your symptoms might actually be due to an underlying coconut oil sensitivity? I know that there is an article here somewhere about how some people seem to be sensitive to coconut oil. I'll see if I can find it.

It can be salicylate sensitivity as mentioned in the SOTT article "Plants Bite Back" courtesy Weston A. Price foundation.
http://www.sott.net/articles/show/224159-Plants-Bit...

Thanks for that article broken.english, it does explain the reason, as I commented in another thread, it is about sensitivity to arachidonic acid, which I experienced before when eating too many egg yolks. So, I just need to cut down on the amount of coconut oil that I consume in a week. I was rather overdoing it! :) The situation is relatively stabilized now, just the occasional muscle ache just above the elbow. That's a relief because I tested coconut oil as ok to eat.
 

Yas

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hello everybody!

I started the EE Breathing program two weeks ago...

I was feeling great! I felt that my attention got better so that I could concentrate in reading all the SOTT, Cass and the Forum material.

Until I got to the Candida issue...

I realised that I match with all the characteristics of a Cadidiasis suferer... :S

I started avoiding sugar, and I added lots of garlic and grapefruit juice in my food. I'm planning to start the program completely the next week.

Yesterday I had terrible sugar cravings... I discovered now that I am a great sugar addict... I feel very weak and I have headaches.

I feel a lot of anxiety and and I am quite irritable since yesterday...

I guess is the detoxifying symptoms... I feel that I can barely focus enough to write this down... :scared:

According to my understanding this means that I'm finally attacking the right problem, and so the yeast is making some kind of revolution inside of me because they don't want to be kicked out... But I feel a little bit worried with all this symptoms and I also worry about the fact that they started before I even started to apply the program properly...

So I just wanted to share and read what you think about it. :)
 
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Gertrudes

Guest
I thought I would share my recent experiences in the fighting Candida "quest".

For the past 2 weeks I have been suffering from strong die off symptom. I had to stop taking the anti fungals twice, and when restarting at the lowest dose, die off would kick in real bad.
Redefining my fighting strategy so as to not overwhelm my body, I decided to follow the suggestions given in a post by Nathan in another thread, here. I have ordered an intestinal repair complex supplement (g-tox express suggested in Nathan's post seems to only be available for practitioners) and Saccharomyces Boulardii. I will focus on healing my intestinal walls for the following weeks and then restart the fight.

In the meantime I noticed that when taking either Caprylic acid or Olive Leaf Extract, if I take for example 8 capsules separately instead of 2 four times a day to make it four doses in total as in the recommended nystatin protocol, my die of symptoms are less severe. It seems that what really triggers it is to take a stronger dose at once. If any one knows whether how I take these 2 supplements interferes with the process, as in, Candida becoming in any way resistant by taking each capsule separately, please let me know. I assumed it doesn't matter, but I don't really know.

Also, I found the following quote from _http://www.candida-albicans-cure.com/olive-leaf-extract.html

Dosage
Olive Leaf Extract – two 500 mg capsules four to six times daily, with meals
You need a total of 4000-6000 mg per day.
The pills you take should be standardized to 20% Oleuropein. If not do the math to determine the number of pills to take. If yours is only 10% Oleuropein, you need to take twice as many, etc.

I didn't know about Oleuropein, so mine is only 6%....

From another site: _http://www.drhoffman.com/page.cfm/126

In the early1900s scientists isolated a bitter compound called oleuropein from olive leaf that was thought to give the olive tree its disease resistance. In 1962 an Italian researcher recorded that Oleuropein had the ability to lower blood pressure in animals. Other European researchers validated that claim and also found it to increase blood flow in the coronary arteries, relieve arrhythmia and prevent intestinal muscle spasms. In the years to come, a Dutch researcher identified that a primary ingredient in oleuropein inhibited the growth of viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. This chemical was elenolic acid. Further European research determined this compound to have strong bactericidal, antiviral and antifungal capabilities. A safety study on calcium elenolate was tested with laboratory animals and published by the Upjohn pharmaceutical company in 1970. The study concluded that even in doses several hundred times higher than recommended; no toxic or other adverse side effects were discovered.

So it seems that for those of us who choose olive leaf extract as an anti fungal, we need to check Oleuropein levels as this seems to be the component responsible for Olive Leaf's acclaimed anti fungal, anti bacterial and overall health inducing properties.
 
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Gertrudes

Guest
While looking around on the net I found what seems to be a sensible Candida protocol for those of us who have a hard time fighting Candida, and to whom the die off symptoms seem to never end.

I realized after a while that this was Dr Rodger Murphree's page, someone whose books have been mentioned several times on this forum.

So here is what he has to say:

Yeast Overgrowth Protocol
Step 1: Eliminate yeast-producing foods with the Candida diet above. Also make sure you’re taking yeast-free supplements.

Step 2: Improve digestion. Gastric hydrochloric acid and pancreatic enzymes help keep Candida from overgrowing in the small intestine. Patients on Zantac, Nexium, or other acid-blocking drugs increase their risk for developing yeast overgrowth.

• Supplement with pancreatic enzymes with each meal.

• Supplement with betaine hydrochloric acid with each meal. Yeast can’t live in an acidic environment.


Step 3: Replace good bacteria, such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. catnaforme, L. fermentum, and Bifidobacterium bifidum. These normally inhabit vaginal and gastrointestinal tracts; help digest, absorb, and produce certain nutrients; and keep potentially harmful bacteria and yeast in check.

Yogurt contains certain strains of good bacteria, but it isn’t standardized for a particular amount. Also, most yogurts are made from L. bulgaricus or Streptococcus thermophilus. Both are friendly bacteria, but neither will help colonize the colon. So it’s best to use live organisms that are shipped on ice and then kept refrigerated until purchase. Live L. acidophilus and B. bifidum powders or capsules are preferred.
• Supplement with probiotics for three months: 5–10 billion organisms on an empty stomach each day. Some extremely resistant yeast infections may need continuous probiotic replacement therapy.

Step 4: Reduce liver toxicity. Always take milk thistle and or alpha lipoic acid when taking yeast overgrowth (antifungal) prescription or natural medication.

Step 5. Treat your intestinal permeability. Yeast overgrowth can cause intestinal permeability and contribute to food sensitivities or allergies. Treat leaky gut and yeast overgrowth at the same time.

Step 6: Use prescription or natural antifungal medicines.

You can find more at: _http://www.drrodger.com/yeastovergrowth.html

What he says also fits with the link I added above in my previous post from forum member Nathan, where the focus is firstly given to healing the intestinal walls, and on Dr Murphree's advice, improving digestion, replacing good bacteria, taking care of the liver, and finally attacking Candida.
Perhaps when Candidiasis is severe, this approach might gently heal what needs healing and subsequently decrease the intensity of Herxheimer reactions.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
I'm surprised while searching this topic to not find a mention of tobacco having antifungal properties (my apologies if it's already been talked about here--it didn't come up in my search).

From Wikipedia
_https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Nicotiana_tabacum

Ethnomedicinal uses

Tobacco has been used as an antispasmodic, a diuretic, an emetic, an expectorant, a sedative, and a sialagogue, and in homeopathy.

Tobacco has a long history of use by medical herbalists as a relaxant, though since it is a highly addictive drug it is seldom employed internally or externally at present. The leaves act as antispasmodics, discutients, diuretics, emetics, expectorants, irritants, sedatives and sialagogues. Wet tobacco leaves are applied externally in the treatment of rheumatic swelling, skin diseases and stings, as the active ingredients can be absorbed through the skin. They are also a certain cure for painful piles. A homeopathic remedy made from the dried leaves is used in the treatment of nausea and travel sickness. Some other activities reported for Nicotiana tabacum are: Analgesic activity, anesthetic activity, angiogenesis inhibition, antibacterial activity, anti convulsant activities, anti estrogenic effect, antifungal activity, antiglaucomic activity, antioxidant activity, antistress effect, antiviral activity, aromatase inhibition, arrhythmogenic effect, carcinogenic activity, bronchoconstrictor activity, bupivacaine kinetics,

The regions that have histories of use of the plant include:
  • Brazil: Leaves are heated and the juice is squeezed out, mixed with ash from bark of Theobroma subircanum or other Theobroma species to make an intoxicating snuff. The leaf juice is taken orally to induce vomiting and narcosis.
  • Colombia: Fresh leaf is used as poultice over boils and infected wounds; the leaves are crushed with oil from palms and used as hair treatment to prevent baldness.
  • Cuba: Extract of the leaf is taken orally to treat dysmenorrheal.
  • East Africa: Dried leaves of Nicotiana tabacum and Securinega virosa are mixed into a paste and used externally to destroy worms in sores.
  • Ecuador: Leaf juice is used for indisposition, chills and snake bites and to treat pulmonary ailments.
  • Fiji: Fresh root is taken orally for asthma and indigestion; fresh root is applied ophthalmically as drops for bloodshot eyes and other problems; seed is taken orally for rheumatism and to treat hoarsness.
  • Guatemala: Leaves are applied externally by adults for myasis, headache and wounds; hot water extract of the dried leaf is applied externally for ring worms, fungal diseases of the skin, wounds, ulcers, bruises, sores, mouth lesions, stomartitis and mucosa; leaf is orally taken for kidney diseases.
  • Haiti: Decoction of dried leaf is taken orally for bronchitis and pneumonia.
  • India: Juice of Securinega leucopyrus is mixed with the dried leaves of Nicotiana tabacum and applied externally for parasites; Fresh leaves are mixed with corn-cob or Amorphophallus paeonifolium to treat asthma.
  • Iran: Infusion of the dried leaf is applied externally as an insect repellent; ointments made from crushed leaves are used for baldness, dermatitis and infectious ulceration and as a pediculicide.
  • Mexico (Southeastern): Among the Ancient Maya, Nicotiana was considered a sacred plant, closely associated with deities of earth and sky, and used for both visionary and therapeutic ends. The contemporary Tzeltal and Tzotzil Maya of Highland Chiapas (Mexico) are bearers of this ethnobotanical inheritance, preserving a rich and varied tradition of Nicotiana use and folklore. The entire tobacco plant is viewed as a primordial medicine and a powerful botanical ‘‘helper’’ or ‘‘protector.’’ Depending on the condition to be treated, whole Nicotiana leaves used are used alone or in combination with other herbs in the preparation of various medicinal plasters and teas. In its most common form, fresh or ‘‘green’’ leaves are ground with slaked lime to produce an intoxicating oral snuff that serves as both a protective and therapeutic agent.
  • United States: Extract of N. tabacum is taken orally to treat tiredness, ward off diseases, and quiet fear.
  • Tanzania: Leaves of Nicotiana tabacum are placed in the vagina to stimulate labor.

In my struggles against candida, which I suspect also harbors in my lungs and sinuses, I've found tobacco to be helpful. If my sinuses are clogged to some degree (often), I have some pain while breathing the smoke out through my nose which usually goes away after a few exhalations of smoking (I almost always exhale the smoke out of my nose now for this purpose). Sometimes it decloggs my sinuses, but not always.

I've coughed up phlegm/brown mucus fairly frequently after smoking (it is listed as an expectorant, as well--get out of my lungs, yeast!)--especially after taking DMSO in the morning--which I currently attribute to likely being candida and possibly heavy metal expulsion, since it's darkest when taking the DMSO.

It's interesting to see that wikipedia lists so many medicinal aspects of the plant and doesn't brandish the failed "causes cancer" hypothesis.

Though, as a contraindication, it is worth noting that I typically smoke Nicotiana Rustica, not Tobaccum. I strongly suspect it has the same antifungal properties.

_https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Nicotiana_rustica
 
Gertrudes & all, thanks so much for all this great info! I'm definitely going to check into this myself.

BTW, just to let you know that Dr Rodger Murphree's page has moved to here:

http://drrodgermurphree.com/yeast-overgrowth/
 
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