Fat Bomb - Keto Custard Recipe and variations

Nancy2feathers

The Living Force
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

Ren and I made the fat bomb custard excluding the gelatin and adding vanilla bean instead of vanilla extract for flavor. The results were amazing! The custard was thick and creamy and the flavor from the vanilla bean was much richer than with the V extract. Vanilla bean is expensive but it was in the spice cubbard for a while, so we gave it a try. Definitely different in taste compared to V extract. :D
 

Ollie

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Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

I made my last batch of Fat Bombs without gelatin too. The custard was like custard - mid thick, thin - and creamy.
 

Mariama

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Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

Prodigal Son said:
I made my last batch of Fat Bombs without gelatin too. The custard was like custard - mid thick, thin - and creamy.

I also made a batch of custard with gelatin. By mistake I used one litre of coconut milk and water, instead of 500 ml. This is the recipe with lard (1, 5 kilo). And still it turned out very, very thick. Instead of real lemon juice I used some juice out of a bottle, but I wouldn't recommend it, because the taste is less strong. Still enjoying it though and the taste of lard seems to disappear a bit. :cool2:
 

darksai

Jedi Master
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variaitons/Recipes

Been a little busy the past few weeks and then had to replace my keyboard, so I'm only getting round to typing up my Fat Bomb Experiment notes now.
Here's the first:

Avo/Guacamole Fat Bomb
(1st attempt)

Aim

To replace coconut oil with avo, try out a silicone mould I bought, and see what happens.

Ingredients

Base:
400ml coconut milk
250g butter
9 egg yolks
1 tbsp gelatin

Flavor:
2 medium avos
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1/2-1 tsp salt and pepper (each)
100ml water


Method

I made the base part as usual, and blended together all the flavor ingredients except the water. After cooling, I first added the water, mixed it in well, then added the guacamole and mixed up again.

Result

Overall, the taste was pretty good. The guacamole part by itself tasted like it had too much lemon and vinegar at first, so I added extra salt and pepper which helped a little. Oddly, I didn't seem to notice the acidity overpowering the avo in the final recipe. Texture-wise, it was a bit of a disaster. I added too little gelatin and way too much water so it didn't keep the mould shape at all. I also realized that the avo will still go overripe in fridge by around 48 hours which did not taste all that great. In future, I'll definitely be keeping my avo recipes in the freezer.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

Some time ago when I was beginning to cook my own food and looking for recipes, there were so many on the internet that I realized I could sweep through many of them and take my pick based on ingredients, reviews, ease and so on. I developed a way of documenting recipes that makes it easier to compare them and see which ingredient changes cause which effects, how to adjust the recipe for a different texture or flavor, and so on. I think we can do this for the Custard. Here is an example of what I did for Coconut flour Biscuits. I used the Linux equivalent of Notepad and used tabs to organize it. Each column is a different recipe. This is ONLY an example. Notice I have included sugar/honey and other questionable things, only because I wanted to study the quantities so I would have an idea how to substitute if necessary.

Code:
Coconut Biscuits	1	2	3	4	5

Coconut flour		1/3C	2/3C	1/2C	1/2C	6tbsp
Eggs			1	6L	3	4	2
Whites			3/4C
Oil					1/4C	5tbsp	6tbsp
Salt			1/4tsp	1/2tsp	1/4tsp	dash
Onion							1/4C
Garlic							2clove
Fresh Herbs						1tbsp
Dried Herbs						3/4tsp
Baking soda				1/2tsp		1/4tsp
Baking powder			1tsp		1/2tsp
Cider vinegar						1/2tsp
Coconut Milk						2tbsp
Shredded Coconut			1/2C O
Pureed pumpkin				1/2C
Sugar			
Honey				2tbsp	1-3tbsp	2tbsp
Butter			4tbsp
Milk			1tbsp				
Temp			400F	400F	400F	400F	350F
Bake time		20	10-15	15	12-15	12-15
Amount			6muffin	12spoon		9bisc	8-10
Reviews			Super	A hit		Super
Claims						Soaker	Fluffy
Notes						
1
2
3
4	Butter or Coconut oil. Butter tastes better and makes a firmer biscuit (15-20% water?). Sweetener can be omitted.
Instructions:
4	15 minutes is good for a toaster oven without preheat. "Bake until just starting to brown"
5	Mix everything but soda/vinegar. Mix them in last (why not just mix the vinegar last? Else the soda will react with it before it's mixed in). 
	Spoon batter and then mash them 1/2" thick.
Refs:
4	http://wellnessmama.com/2233/coconut-flour-biscuits/
5	http://empoweredsustenance.com/onion-herb-coconut-flour-biscuits/

I started on a version for the custard but haven't finished it - I think it would be a good way to condense the recipes down:

Code:
=== INCOMPLETE ===

Custard Fat Bombs	Coconut		Palmfree	Non-Dairy

Egg yolks		24		24		24
Water					400mL		
Coconut Milk		1L
Butter/Ghee or Lard	500g		750g-1lb
Coconut oil		1C
Plain Gelatin		3tbsp		3tbsp
Xylitol			11tsp		11tsp
Erythritol
Vanilla			

Directions:
	Put milk, oil, gelatin and xylitol in a pot. Stir to soften the gelatin. Use a heat diffuser on low-medium heat. Add a meat thermometer and stir occasionally as it warms, while you separate whites from eggs (the whites can be frozen and used for something else). 
	After the pot starts steaming, get ready to add the yolks. Take it off the burner when the thermometer reads 70C/158F.

I started this a while ago but never finished it. I figured I'd put it here in case someone wants to run with it.
 

l apprenti de forgeron

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

Keit said:
Well, you can find coconut milk in large stores, in their "sushi ingredients" section. At least this is how it is here. I bought some before but haven't used it yet, since couldn't find xylitol or erythritol, and sorbitol (the only sugar replacement that could find) causes slight gastrointestinal unrest, at least for me. So I thought about postponing the experiment until I'll find some xylitol or erythritol.
Stevia could be another option for you?. Maybe I missed something, and stevia is not recommended for some reason.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

I was told I could use Stevia in my custard by someone here but it didn't work - it had a sickeningly strong Stevia taste and was hardly sweet at all. Perhaps it can work but the details need to be ironed out. I think the person with the Gandalf avatar can tell us which kind of Stevia they used. :)
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

I haven't tried stevia in my fat custard yet, just the xylitol and vanilla. But stevia has the tendency to be overpowering and bitter if you overdo it. You have to have just the right amount, not too much. You may be able to curb the stevia with a little salt. Be careful if you're using salted butter though, as you can also over-salt the custard too.
 

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

Xylitol has different taste depending on the brand. I use Xyla brand.
 

l apprenti de forgeron

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

monotonic said:
I was told I could use Stevia in my custard by someone here but it didn't work - it had a sickeningly strong Stevia taste and was hardly sweet at all. Perhaps it can work but the details need to be ironed out. I think the person with the Gandalf avatar can tell us which kind of Stevia they used. :)

3D Student said:
I haven't tried stevia in my fat custard yet, just the xylitol and vanilla. But stevia has the tendency to be overpowering and bitter if you overdo it. You have to have just the right amount, not too much. You may be able to curb the stevia with a little salt. Be careful if you're using salted butter though, as you can also over-salt the custard too.
Thank you both. I'll see if I can find some interesting information about how to use stevia. Otherwise, I will have to proceed with trial and error. Thank you again.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

I find that even in low amounts, the sweetness of Stevia is almost imperceptible and it's signature is overpowering, when used in thick emulsified foods. With my experience I wouldn't try using Stevia in any kind of fat bomb again, it has never turned out well for me. It works well for tea though.
 

Nancy2feathers

The Living Force
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

I prefer the taste of xylitol (Xyla brand from birch trees, not from corn like some other brands) over stevia. For me, stevia, even in small amounts, has an aftertaste that reminds me of an artificial sweetener. I someday may have to get used to it, but for now I`ll stick with xylitol. :)
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

Erythritol has a marshmallowy taste and goes good in chocolate-type things. For instance one thing I've been doing recently is putting 4tbsp coconut oil along with some gelatin, cocoa and xylitol in a small canning jar, which I can screw the blender base onto, and blend until it's emulsified. I can do this much quicker than I can make a custard. It's like hot chocolate and if you use erythritol it has a marshmallowy hint.
 

Gaby

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Re: Keto Custard - Experimental Variations/Recipes

A heads up regarding erythritol... Make sure it is GMO free. Some erythritol is derived from GMOs and that is really bad news:

GMO derived erythritol, the main ingredient in Truvia, found to be a potent insecticide

http://www.sott.net/article/280129-GMO-derived-erythritol-the-main-ingredient-in-Truvia-found-to-be-a-potent-insecticide

Truvia sweetener is made from about 99.5% erythritol (a sugar alcohol), and 0.5% rebiana, an extract from the stevia plant (but not at all the same thing as stevia). A shocking new study published in the journal PLOS ONE (1) has found that Truvia, an alternative sweetener manufactured by food giant Cargill, is a potent insecticide that kills fruit flies which consume it.

The study is titled, Erythritol, a Non-Nutritive Sugar Alcohol Sweetener and the Main Component of Truvia, Is a Palatable Ingested Insecticide.

The study found that while fruit flies normally live between 39 and 51 days, those that ate the Truvia ingredient erythritol died in less than a week.

Erythritol made from yeast fed genetically modified corn derivatives

Erythritol is often indirectly derived from genetically modified corn, by the way. Cargill was forced to settle a class action lawsuit last year (2) for labeling Truvia "natural" when it's actually made from a fermentation process whereby yeast are fed GM corn maltodextrin.

Cargill plays word games with this process, insisting that "erythritol is not derived from corn or dextrose feedstock; it is derived from the yeast organism."

Yeah, okay, but the yeast are fed GMOs. So they're playing mind games with their explanations.

There is a verified non-GMO erythritol available today, by the way, and it's made by Pyure Brands, based in Florida.

Pyure Brands offers alternative sweeteners for the health-conscious marketplace, and their product is USDA Organic certified and Non-GMO Project Verified.

Truvia a really amazing insecticide

This story on Truvia's insecticidal properties has really caught the attention of the public. Even CBS News (3), a mainstream media outlet that rarely covers the dangers of food additives, covered this story, reporting:

Erythritol, the main component of the sweetener Truvia, has a new, unexpected application -- it may be used as an insecticide. ...Researchers found that fruit flies fed with food that included erythritol or the erythritol-containing sweetener Truvia died much sooner than flies fed with food containing other types of sweeteners.

"The more you get [fruit flies] to consume erythritol, the faster they die," Sean O'Donnell, a professor of biology at Drexel University in Philadelphia, told CBS News.

"We are hoping to develop it into a human-safe insecticide," O'Donnell later says in the story.

The abstract of the published study concludes, "Here we show that Erythritol, a non-nutritive sugar alcohol, was toxic to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster."

No other sweetener killed the fruit flies

Fruit flies were also subjected to feeding tests with sucrose and corn syrup, but those sweeteners didn't kill them. Only erythritol had this effect, as it shown in the chart below:
[...]

Erythritol also interfered with the flies' motor coordination, as stated in the study text:

...adult flies raised on food containing Truvia displayed aberrant motor control prior to death. We therefore assayed motor reflex behavior through climbing assays. Flies raised on food containing Truvia showed a significantly decreased ability to climb.

Researchers were also able to determine that stevia was not the cause of the problem. They also tested Purevia and found it was safe for fruit flies. Only erythritol, the main component of Truvia, replicated the toxic effects on fruit flies.

Erythritol also exhibited a dose-dependent death response, meaning the more that was consumed by the flies, the more quickly they died.

What to make of Truvia's usefulness as a pesticide?

The FDA has declared Truvia to be safe for human consumption. Then again, the FDA has also declared aspartame to be safe for human consumption, so that doesn't carry any real credibility.

Sugar alcohols are widely consumed by millions of people, but that also isn't any guarantee of their safety because Vioxx was also widely consumed by millions of people (while killing tens of thousands of them via heart attacks).

Most people believe sugar alcohols are safe to consume, and perhaps they're right. But maybe there's some yet-unknown contaminant in erythritol that's causing these toxic effects. Or perhaps it's the GMO connection, since most erythritol comes from genetically modified corn. A really interesting study on this would test GMO-derived erythritol vs. non-GMO erythritol to determine if there's any difference.

Many scientists might also argue that perhaps erythritol is perfectly safe for humans and only selectively toxic to insects because of their different physiology. That would be the best-case scenario.

If true, it opens up a positive conclusion to all this: What if erythritol could be used as a natural pesticide that replaces the toxic chemical pesticides sold by companies like Monsanto and DuPont?

Imagine, if you will, a natural, plant-based pesticide that could be sprayed on crops to kill insects, yet still eaten by humans in trace amounts with no ill effects. That's the hope of this discovery: maybe sugar alcohols can be sprayed on crops or used in organic food production.

By the way, the idea for this research came from a sixth-grader named Simon D. Kaschock-Marenda, once again proving that science is available to everyone, including children. This is why I have openly called for enhanced science education in America -- in the hope that more children can learn about scientific investigations and use their knowledge to help achieve a safer, less toxic world.
 

Laura

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I think that the excitement relating Erythritol to GMOs and being an "insecticide" might be a bit of panic button pushing. We all know what xylitol can do to dogs...

Anyway, some way back on this thread somebody, I think it was Yaz, talked about using lecithin in the Fat Bomb instead of egg yolks. At the time I thought: Why? All the goodness in the egg yolks is missed that way.

Anyhow, I found an article about why some people use lecithin instead of egg yolks: to reduce the fat content of foods and still achieve emulsification. Well, since it is a FAT bomb and you want as much fat as possible, and the fat of egg yolks is extremely good for you, I am not going to advise anyone to use lecithin in place of egg yolks.


Lecithin: An Egg Yolk Substitute
_http://forum.epicurean.com/webbbs/webbbs_conf5.pl?read=9401

Posted By: Baron Blackfang
Tuesday, 25 April 2006, at 1:36 p.m.

Egg yolks, with 100 mg cholesterol per large yolk, are a real no-no for those of us on a low-cholesterol diet. Yet, egg yolk is a great emulsifier (binder) and has a wonderful flavor. So, what to do? The answer is substituting lecithin granules for egg yolk. Lecithin granules, available from your health-foods store, are a low-cost, white, water-soluble, tasteless phospholipid, having only 40 calories per tablespoon (15 grams). It has a long shelf life, also.

Lecithin is used commercially as an emulsifier, such as in baking and salad dressings, in order to reduce or eliminate eggs in the food product. Nutritionally, lecithin, whose commercial source is soybean oil thus making it suitable for vegetarians, increases HDL cholesterol (the good stuff) while reducing LDL cholesterol (the bad stuff) by making LDL more soluble, thereby reducing arterial plaque formation.

One tablespoon of lecithin granules will substitute for one large egg yolk. I have used lecithin to make meat balls, meatloaf, mayonnaise, and salad dressings quite successfully. Unfortunately, lecithin, being tasteless, can't replace the yolk flavor. Personally, while I used to love fried eggs, I now don't miss the taste of egg yolk.

If you must have the taste of egg yolk but don't want the fat, try using "egg substitute" powder, available at your health-foods store. This product is lecithin granules blended with powdered egg whites, naturally colored and flavored to resemble dried eggs. I haven't tried this product, but your comments would be appreciated if you have.

I hope that you will give lecithin a try in your cooking. If you feel challenged by cooking a low-cholesterol cuisine, please remember that low-fat doesn't have to mean "low taste". It's all a matter of making the proper substitutions. If you need advice on fat substitutions, please post here and I'll try to advise you.

Bottom line: lecithin evil unless it cannot be avoided.
 
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