Keto recipes

Gimpy

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davey72 said:
Laura said:
I reduced the fat just a tad today because we are all getting overloaded around here. Also increased the gelatin to 4 tablespoons for a liter of coconut milk, 3/4 of a 500 gram chunk of butter, and 1 cup of coconut oil. Still 24 egg yolks. Even though I didn't have a curdle, I added the two tablespoons of water and used the immersion blender. The texture was like silk and very light! Amazing stuff.

Maybe i am wrong, but i thought you once said that you couldn't tolerate coconut, as it is a seed. Did you have to readapt to it?

I have a serious tree nut allergy. (I carry an epipen for walnuts and bee stings.) When I first began the diet, I couldn't eat coconut at all. The key to eventually using coconut oil, then coconut cream/milk was healing the digestive system. It took me a little over a year and a half to eliminate foods, and heal my gut to the point I could re-test coconuts.

There are points in transitioning to the diet in which your body will become sensitive to certain things. At one point, I couldn't eat eggs without joint pain. Now I can eat scrambled eggs when I want some. I was more cautious with the coconuts, due to the tree nut allergy. I can report now that I eat coconut oil/cream every day, without reaction. It's important to note that not everyone will be able to reach that point, its very individual.

In my case, I still can't eat other tree nuts without risking a serious allergic reaction. Coconuts remain the only one I can eat, and even with this particular food, I don't consume the raw meat at all...just the cream/oils.

It may be the same for Laura, or not. :flowers:
 

Laura

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davey72 said:
Laura said:
I reduced the fat just a tad today because we are all getting overloaded around here. Also increased the gelatin to 4 tablespoons for a liter of coconut milk, 3/4 of a 500 gram chunk of butter, and 1 cup of coconut oil. Still 24 egg yolks. Even though I didn't have a curdle, I added the two tablespoons of water and used the immersion blender. The texture was like silk and very light! Amazing stuff.

Maybe i am wrong, but i thought you once said that you couldn't tolerate coconut, as it is a seed. Did you have to readapt to it?

A couple of years ago I had a pretty negative reaction to eating coconut flesh. This time around, I decided to give the fat and milk another try and so far, so good. The same thing happened with butter. I couldn't eat it for over two years, only could tolerate ghee. Now butter seems to be okay. I think that when your gut heals, you don't have as many problems though, of course, there are quite a few things I'm not willing to risk.
 

Laura

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Nienna said:
If someone is allergic to eggs, would that only be the whites they are allergic to, or is that something that someone with this condition would have to try to find out?

Usually, people who cannot tolerate eggs are sensitive to the whites, not the yolks. It sort of goes with almond allergy.
 

darksai

Jedi Master
Laura said:
Saieden said:
I used (fat : carbs):

165ml coconut cream - 30 : 8

80g butter - 64 : 0
20g coconut oil - 20 : 0
1 tbsp cocoa - ~1 : ~0
2.5 tsp xylitol - 0 : 10
2 egg yolks - 9 : ~ 1
total - ~125 : ~ 18


Used the same instructions from the milkshake recipe in the first post, whisking in the cocoa before the egg yolks at the end.

That's pretty high carbs. If you eat that and you are trying to stay under 20 carbs per day, you are basically limited for the rest of the day. But, if you just have that and the prescribed portion of protein during the day, you'll be okay. I think you could cut the xylitol in half or use erythritol.

At the moment, I'm targeting around 25 carbs max, which is almost all xylitol. I find vegetables take up more time and energy than they give back since you can't just buy enough for 2-4 weeks and lump them in the freezer. I'm perfectly happy with a portion of seasoned meat, be it mince, steak, sausage or whatever.

I can cut those xylitol carbs down even further though, sweetness is really just a luxury after all. I've acquired the taste of +90% dark chocolate and unsweetened black coffee, so there's really no excuse for me to use any more sweetener than absolutely necessary.
 

Alana

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Saieden said:
Laura said:
Saieden said:
I used (fat : carbs):

165ml coconut cream - 30 : 8

80g butter - 64 : 0
20g coconut oil - 20 : 0
1 tbsp cocoa - ~1 : ~0
2.5 tsp xylitol - 0 : 10
2 egg yolks - 9 : ~ 1
total - ~125 : ~ 18


Used the same instructions from the milkshake recipe in the first post, whisking in the cocoa before the egg yolks at the end.

That's pretty high carbs. If you eat that and you are trying to stay under 20 carbs per day, you are basically limited for the rest of the day. But, if you just have that and the prescribed portion of protein during the day, you'll be okay. I think you could cut the xylitol in half or use erythritol.

At the moment, I'm targeting around 25 carbs max, which is almost all xylitol. I find vegetables take up more time and energy than they give back since you can't just buy enough for 2-4 weeks and lump them in the freezer. I'm perfectly happy with a portion of seasoned meat, be it mince, steak, sausage or whatever.

I can cut those xylitol carbs down even further though, sweetness is really just a luxury after all. I've acquired the taste of +90% dark chocolate and unsweetened black coffee, so there's really no excuse for me to use any more sweetener than absolutely necessary.

Since doing the fatbomb, I have been steadily decreasing the amount of xylitol I use. I find things "too sweet" nowadays.

I found another good way to have my fat bomb, since I can't eat lots of it at a time: I make my tea in the morning, let it cool down, and then put it in the blender with 3 hearty scoops of fatbomb. Mix it in blender, add ice and I have my tea-shake! :) Then I eat some more fatbomb in the afternoon, after dinner. This way, I get much more fat in me in a day. I even used the fatbomb in blender with coffee the other day (I LOVE coffee, but I can't have it too often) and I didn't have the over-energizing feeling and "jazz hands" that I usually get from coffee :thup:
 

LQB

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Alana said:
I even used the fatbomb in blender with coffee the other day (I LOVE coffee, but I can't have it too often) and I didn't have the over-energizing feeling and "jazz hands" that I usually get from coffee :thup:

I've posted elsewhere about mycotoxins (from fungi) in coffee based on info from Dave Asprey's podcasts (bulletproof). He is a bit mycotoxin-phobic due to high personal sensitivity but he has good knowledge from lots of testing. He maintains that much of the negative effects of coffee come from the mycotoxins from mold growing in/on the beans prior to roasting. Mycotoxins are pretty hardy chemicals that can survive high temps and harsh conditions. Reputable roasters will refuse delivery of beans that exceed contracted levels of mycotoxins. My guess is that much of these "refused" beans end up in instant coffee and would explain why instant coffee consistently tests much higher for mycotoxin content.

He (Asprey) suggests that if coffee sends you to the bathroom to pee often, then it is likely high in mycotoxins. I've personally noticed this difference drinking coffee made from his beans.

Mycotoxin levels in grains for human consumption are closely regulated for mycotoxin content (for example: aflatoxin B). But the same grains in animal feed are not regulated like this so feed producers must volunteer these tests and self-regulate. It will not do to feed mycotoxins to animals and assume that they will not show up in the fat/flesh of the animal.
 

Gaby

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LQB said:
I've posted elsewhere about mycotoxins (from fungi) in coffee based on info from Dave Asprey's podcasts (bulletproof).

And organic coffee is included? :/

I have coffee once a week, sometimes even less. It lifts my mood although I'm craving it less and less lately since re-starting ketosis. I had it yesterday and noticed a flare-up in itchiness. The coffee that I had was non-organic. But I'm willing to go without it.

During ketosis, I had noticed itchiness in the past with pepper, which contains mycotoxins unless it is freshly ground from peppercorns.
 

Nienna

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H-kqge said:
Some people are allergic to both the yolk & the whites. But the associated symptoms are things such as eczema & wheezing, to nausea or stomach pain. As we on the forum know, most people will still be consuming inflammatory foods (as well as non-foods containing a wide range of inflammatory contaminants) & not be able to accurately determine an actual allergy. Albumin is an egg protein that may cause a reaction for some & apparently, children are more prone to egg allergies.

Some more on the topic: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_allergy

Laura said:
Nienna said:
If someone is allergic to eggs, would that only be the whites they are allergic to, or is that something that someone with this condition would have to try to find out?

Usually, people who cannot tolerate eggs are sensitive to the whites, not the yolks. It sort of goes with almond allergy.

Thank you both for the information. I guess, once I get up the nerve, I will try an egg yolk and see what happens.
 

LQB

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Gaby said:
LQB said:
I've posted elsewhere about mycotoxins (from fungi) in coffee based on info from Dave Asprey's podcasts (bulletproof).

And organic coffee is included? :/

I have coffee once a week, sometimes even less. It lifts my mood although I'm craving it less and less lately since re-starting ketosis. I had it yesterday and noticed a flare-up in itchiness. The coffee that I had was non-organic. But I'm willing to go without it.

During ketosis, I had noticed itchiness in the past with pepper, which contains mycotoxins unless it is freshly ground from peppercorns.

I think organic is a must on top of the mycotoxin issue. The good news is that demand for organic certified coffee is very high and forcing more organic producers into the market. The bad news is that mycotoxins have not received market visibility (as I think they should).
 

darksai

Jedi Master
Gaby said:
And organic coffee is included? :/


Yes, unfortunately :( Organic mold is still mold, much like anti-nutrients.


This article from Dave Asprey is quite helpful: _https://www.bulletproofexec.com/why-bad-coffee-makes-you-weak/


And this one has some good guielines: _http://www.naturalnews.com/034063_mycotoxins_coffee.html#

1. Drink coffee that has been made via wet processing. Because mycotoxins often form during the drying process, wet beans are much less likely to contain them than dry beans.

2. Do not drink decaffeinated coffee. Caffeine actually protects coffee beans from the growth of mold and can prevent large amounts of mycotoxins from growing.

3. Choose arabica beans over robusta beans. Though robusta varieties do have higher levels of caffeine, they also contain more mycotoxins.

4. Consider the environment in which your beans are grown. Because mold is less apt to grow at higher elevations, buying beans that have been harvested in the mountains of Central America is a great way to decrease the amount of toxins in your coffee.

5. Stay away from blends. Though blended coffees may taste good, there really is no way of telling where the different bean varieties have come from. Try to stick to single estate products rather than the major brand names.

6. Steam is an agent that can help break down toxins, so if all else fails, order an Americano.


Another thing I've read, not mentioned above, is that using beans in the shortest time possible after grinding is another precaution, and of course, keeping the beans in an airtight container.
 

darksai

Jedi Master
Well, my first custard-making experience turned out quite interesting indeed!


Everything went well in the beginning: Cut the heat just as the cream and fat started to simmer, slooowwwly drizzled in the yolks, beating consistently, and thickened it up on the heat again. It was about 90% smooth at this point, and being quite proud of my first attempt at this point, decided I could do better with a good blending. After about 2 minutes with the stick, it was looking even better - 95%. Then, just to make sure it was evenly blended, I gave it a whisk and went for immersion round 2. Not 20 seconds later, half the mixture had curdled and separated.


From similar experience with chocolate, I knew exactly what happened, and once I again, I thought to myself "do not underestimate the friction heat when blending." After blending a little more, on a slower speed, still no luck. Added about 4 tsp water, blended some more, and still not much better. My last hope was the big-boy jug blender, which seemed to make it smooth at first, but after minute or two, much of the fat was clearly separated.


Accepting defeat, I poured it into a dish to put in the fridge for later. It still tasted pretty good, just felt a little weird going down. After about 5 minutes, I decided to try a small serving, just as much so that I didn't have to look at as to not have all that goodness go to waste. I poured a little into a bowl and stirred.. and amazingly, it seemed to just come together again! I stirred the batch, and within a few minutes, it was as smooth as it was after the first round of immersion blending.


I honestly don't know what to make of this. This is by far the strangest thing I've ever seen in the kitchen. The second strangest was that out of the 12 eggs I used for this, 4 were double yolks. And come to think of it, on the day before Easter no less, while my Mom (for whom I'm partly making this for) was out doing getting the Easter eggs and chocolates at the last hour (though that in itself is not surprising at all :lol: ).


Here's what I used, it's approximately 1.5x the size of the second recipe Laura posted (the egg yolks were pretty small, so used the whole dozen):

12 eggs worth of yolks
330ml coconut cream
180g butter
50g coconut oil
4 tsp xylitol
1/2 tsp vanilla.


The photo below is what it's like now, after cooling in the fridge and me having stirred in the vanilla I forgot to add earlier. The texture isn't 100% smooth, but that's OK it's rather like ice cream, but at fridge-temperature instead, which is quite interesting :)
 

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SMM

The Living Force
Nice recipes :) I've ran out of butter ghee, eggs and coconut oil - guess I have a reason to get some more now :cool2:

Gaby said:
During ketosis, I had noticed itchiness in the past with pepper, which contains mycotoxins unless it is freshly ground from peppercorns.

I noticed increased itchiness when I was in ketosis and using ground black pepper, mostly around an old burn wound on my leg. It's definitely decreased but not sure whether it's because of going low carb or dropping the black pepper. Mycotoxins could explain it.
 

A Jay

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My second batch:

7.5 tbsp cultured butter = 90g
250g goat butter = 205g
~1 cup coconut oil = 224g
~1 cup coconut fat from separated milk = ~70g of fat, not sure how many carbs since I didn't use the water but I'll go with 10g
5g powdered stevia = 5g carbs
15 egg yolks = 75g fat with 15g carbs
3 rounded tbls cocoa powder = 5g carbs
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp cinnamon


Total Fat = 664g
Total Carbs= 35g

I followed the directions from Laura's second recipe, with the added heat disperser and constant stirring at a lower temp. At first the batch looked curdled, staying separated very much like what Saieden experienced. However, after letting it cool in the fridge for a bit I started stirring and it magically went from curdled custard to a moose almost instantly.

Saieden said:
Accepting defeat, I poured it into a dish to put in the fridge for later. It still tasted pretty good, just felt a little weird going down. After about 5 minutes, I decided to try a small serving, just as much so that I didn't have to look at as to not have all that goodness go to waste. I poured a little into a bowl and stirred.. and amazingly, it seemed to just come together again! I stirred the batch, and within a few minutes, it was as smooth as it was after the first round of immersion blending.


I honestly don't know what to make of this. This is by far the strangest thing I've ever seen in the kitchen. The second strangest was that out of the 12 eggs I used for this, 4 were double yolks. And come to think of it, on the day before Easter no less, while my Mom (for whom I'm partly making this for) was out doing getting the Easter eggs and chocolates at the last hour (though that in itself is not surprising at all :lol: ).

I agree, it's the weirdest thing I've ever experienced in the kitchen, and congrats on the double yolks. I don't know that I've ever seen one before. :D
 

monotonic

The Living Force
Gaby said:
During ketosis, I had noticed itchiness in the past with pepper, which contains mycotoxins unless it is freshly ground from peppercorns.

We bought some whole peppercorns and I used them, but several times I got one that was plainly rotten and tasted terrible. Unground would certainly contain less, I don't know if they would be free of it.

There has been research showing that pressure cooking reduces these toxins in stuff like nuts, so I assume the same would apply to pepper or coffee if you could make coffee in a pressure cooker?
 

dugdeep

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LQB said:
Alana said:
I even used the fatbomb in blender with coffee the other day (I LOVE coffee, but I can't have it too often) and I didn't have the over-energizing feeling and "jazz hands" that I usually get from coffee :thup:

I've posted elsewhere about mycotoxins (from fungi) in coffee based on info from Dave Asprey's podcasts (bulletproof). He is a bit mycotoxin-phobic due to high personal sensitivity but he has good knowledge from lots of testing. He maintains that much of the negative effects of coffee come from the mycotoxins from mold growing in/on the beans prior to roasting. Mycotoxins are pretty hardy chemicals that can survive high temps and harsh conditions. Reputable roasters will refuse delivery of beans that exceed contracted levels of mycotoxins. My guess is that much of these "refused" beans end up in instant coffee and would explain why instant coffee consistently tests much higher for mycotoxin content.

He (Asprey) suggests that if coffee sends you to the bathroom to pee often, then it is likely high in mycotoxins. I've personally noticed this difference drinking coffee made from his beans.

Mycotoxin levels in grains for human consumption are closely regulated for mycotoxin content (for example: aflatoxin B). But the same grains in animal feed are not regulated like this so feed producers must volunteer these tests and self-regulate. It will not do to feed mycotoxins to animals and assume that they will not show up in the fat/flesh of the animal.

I've ordered Asprey's "Upgraded" coffee a couple of times and I have to say, I notice a world of difference drinking it as opposed to other coffees. You get the same sort of lift from the coffee, but none of the jitteriness or digestive issues. I'm convinced 90% of the negative effect of coffee is due to mycotoxins.

And it tastes really good with butter, too!
 
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