Photography? Anyone?

987baz

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
actually doing it, practicing it, and developing your taste and the soul of your work is where it's at, IMO
I agree with Luc, I think it may also stem, in some instances from the perfection program, it's easy to get lost in it isn't good enough, I need to edit it more etc etc by just doing it, it helps to overcome it IMO.

As far as the editing goes, it really depends on your tastes and what you are trying to do with the image. I, for instance, like the hyperreal, for me it works, because looking at the image immediately tells the viewer this is a representation, it's not real, and maybe it stems from when I was doing fashion photography and all the models wanted to look perfect, so I did the air brushing etc but also edited the image so as to show that this a representation, this is not a "real" person.

As far as editing software goes, I use lightroom and photoshop, but they are expensive. I believe there is a free program called gimp which does a pretty good job, but it depends on what you're trying to do with the image.

looking forward to seeing more of your work 3DStudent :)
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I can go either way. Raw and enhanced. Especially, from a journalistic point and view.
I think, that it's all about accessing and exercising the gift. From the universal cradle of creativity, IMHO.

Here's an opinion on one of the greats (in the medium of B@W, in small and large format photography), on the finished product of a photo. (HD)

The Art of Photography
In this video I'm going to talk about the work of Ansel Adams. Ansel is one of the most successful photographers of all time. He is largely responsible for starting the "California School" of photographers along with Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston.

Their Group f/64 rejected the Pictorialism styles of the day in favor of "pure" or "straight photography" His most notable subjects were landscapes, particularly those of Yosemite National Park.

Ansel developed printing techniques that yielded beautiful prints with an emphasis on tonality and sharpness. Along with the two developed what we know today as the Zone System. The Zone System is a formalized process for black and white printing.

It divides the picture into measured zone densities allowing the photographer to control the exposure in camera, negative processing and the final print.

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++saturation and detail.

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Needed touching for contrast.

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Same needed enhancement.

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Same color enhance.
Before:
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Personally, I find that editing almost always makes the images worse. If anything, it's a very subtle art of slightly balancing things, but even then, if I use my good camera with a decent lens, I almost always prefer the original shot.
I agree with Luc, I think it may also stem, in some instances from the perfection program, it's easy to get lost in it isn't good enough, I need to edit it more etc etc by just doing it, it helps to overcome it IMO.
So you are SOOC (Straight out of camera) guys? ;-) I think if you get a good process and learn the hotkeys, you can spend maybe 5 minutes on a photo you want to edit. When I take a dramatic sky photo on my phone, it's never how it looks in real life. So I like to edit those. And I prefer movement/flow, boldness, high contrast and warm tones, so I want to enhance those a bit too. Cropping is a quick way to enhance a composition, if you have the megapixels to spare.

Also, keep in mind that "researching stuff" can be highly addictive and draining. You don't get better at anything that way - actually doing it, practicing it, and developing your taste and the soul of your work is where it's at, IMO.
Yeah, getting the image right on the first try makes it so you don't need to edit. Some try to just one lens with basic settings so that the focus can just be on getting good images that capture the emotion of the moment. I want to try that minimalist approach.

This might apply to professionals who shoot for extended periods of time, but EVFs (Electronic View Finders) can affect your eyesight. Makes sense, as you're looking at a blue emitting screen at around an inch's distance. That dissuades me, as I don't want another thing to mess up my eyesight. If I had one, I'd at least turn down the brightness, maybe even switch between eyes I use it with. But I hear that there are hybrid viewfinders, where you can turn off the display and use it as a standard optical viewfinder. Here's a video on one professional's experience:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50Fx6LlNarw

I talked to a friend at work about getting a camera. He has a full frame with various lenses. I was surprised that he was actually very into it, and wants to do photography when he retires.

I've settled on a lens. I want to do macro and have an all-around lens, so this 40mm F2.8 one fits the bill. I was surprised to find this "perfect" for me lens. And glad to have found it, but I'm stuck between the body, D3400 or D5500. I guess the question is do I really need a touch screen (for pinch zooming in on images) and a swivel screen (for taking low to the ground pics).

I've only used my short pendulum a few times recently, and tried to get some info on which camera body I should get. I even wrote down the models on pieces of paper, along with blank pieces, and got inconclusive results. I concluded that it doesn't matter what is best, I asked the wrong question, and should network about it. The original purpose was to capture what's inspiring and possibly for art reference, and both cameras would do that just fine.

I also considered not getting a camera, finally. Because photography is already in my life to a small extent, with my phone always with me. This was just an upgrade to a serious device, the phone being the portable always on me device.

I usually "pixel peep" on my phone by zooming in, at least to check the focus. The consensus seems like this is a bad habit, because even slightly out of focus pictures can be keepers, and this brings you out of a creative flow and toward perfectionism. This wedding photographer shows how creativity can be had with what you might not think are "good" photos, sort of breaking the rules:




And this is a really good one showing how you lose opportunities when limiting ISO (noise can be good):

 

Kireto

The Force is Strong With This One
@3DStudent I am the same with you on that one; researching obsessively all in the name of FOMO (I reckon, subconciously atleast). Preparation and some research on how other photographers work is good, but remember that the gear is only as good as the operator for the most part. I have learnt that quality should be sought after when selecting lenses. I feel the OEMs (Nikon, Canon, Sony) out-perform the aftermarket manufacturers (Sigma, Tokina) marginally, but again, your budget is also to be accounted for. Used lenses that have been looked after are fine, and happen to be really good value.

I started using Darktable, its free and allows you to get the most out of RAW photos. I am now on Adobe Lightroom, the user interface is so much better in terms of usability and its pretty speedy too, with little to no lag.

Thos photos are kool, did you take them with your mobile phone?
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thos photos are kool, did you take them with your mobile phone?
Yes, thanks. The phone is all I have at the moment. I edited the RAW files to my liking. I agree, from what I've seen of Lightroom, that it's really user friendly and seems to be made for quick and fast editing for professionals. I still don't like the whole subscription idea for an application. Could you just cancel and repurchase it every few months and batch edit all of your photos? :-P
 

Kireto

The Force is Strong With This One
Yes, thanks. The phone is all I have at the moment. I edited the RAW files to my liking. I agree, from what I've seen of Lightroom, that it's really user friendly and seems to be made for quick and fast editing for professionals. I still don't like the whole subscription idea for an application. Could you just cancel and repurchase it every few months and batch edit all of your photos? :-P
What phone is it?

I didn't at first, thats why I held out and used Darktable, and then I trialled Lightroom meaning it was game-over for Darktable haha. It is admitedly a powerful tool, but I might try and find a free software that is just as capable. I am setting out to finesse my technique out on the field, as opposed to over-enhancing a photo to give it a superficial look.
 
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