Resurrection Ertugrul: An epic with heart and values

dredger

Jedi Master
Yep. And that's why I think it ultimately fails as propaganda. Critics of the Ottoman Empire, or Erdogan, can simply use it to say: "Look how far the mighty have fallen; they're obviously not living up to Etugrul's ideals." I saw a YouTube comment recently to this effect. The guy said something like, "Turkish leaders like Ertugrul don't exist anymore."
This is exactly what I was concluding during these last days : if it's turkish propaganda, they shoot themselves in the foot :wow: .
Now people can compare with their original values and what they have, what they can see.

This series does a good job, sends a beautiful message to Turkish people, to muslims, and finally to all : it demonstrates throught long, detailed and lenghty examples the eternal fight between good and evil. Maybe I'm stepping too far but i see this a strong STO move in these times of major disclosure. Here, the message sent is not done the usual way which can be seen as having an active reaction/response to what is happening nowodays (denounce the lies, exposing the guilties, arguing on 1001 facts), no, here it's a passive but incredibly strong message based in one hand on exposing how "bad people" act, and on the other hand on inspiring by the example, by giving food for the original human's values which are present in any (normal) human being. (I see this like watering the seeds present in many people)

When you think twice about Lizzie's spirit, this series goes on the total opposite, it exposes the psychopaths at length and in depth, but also shows how to counter them mainly by showing, by the example, how to improve one's good qualities (honesty, patiente, tolerance, discernment, trust, faith, ... and many other... even the benefits of "networking between good guys'" is well demonstrated) ... it's indeed brillant.

C's said a lot of time that help is on the way, may this series be part of this help ? This "way of doing" nicely fits with the way STOs act.
 

placematt

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According to her this show is absolutely unique and impressive, and she just couldn't stop watching it. It's like she longed for something that was missing in any other Western entertainment.

She also mentioned the fact that all the characters were clothed, and the most "revealing" or "intimate" element was a kiss on a forehead. And yet the actors still managed to express incredible depth of emotion and affection. She said that she had "nudity fatigue" from all the Western shows, even if they were interesting, like "Outlander".

Morning Keit, i think this hits it on the head for me. I know personally, the fact that there is no nudity and no swearing, that they handle the elements of love and expression of said love through making things for each other, helping each other as well as and holding their faith in their relationships is so refreshing. No drugs, no alcohol etc also really is refreshing. And its kinda new, i grew up around HBO and they are all about violence and nudity, profanity. It had become the normal to my entertainment experience. So to watch a show like this, that is so different from anything I have ever really seen, is eye opening to what potentially is out there.

When it comes to outlander, the show was ok but it was explicitly sexually violent. It really made me not want to continue watching it because the things they chose to show could have been handled a lot better, and or/ could not have been shown but talked about or hinted at. The older i get, the more i struggle to understand people wanting to sit down and watch shows that depict rape like alot of these CSI shows. Maybe my old age is catching up to my tastes but if i have to know about the darkest elements of life, i would prefer to read something like Inside the criminal mind so it serves a purpose. It certainly is not entertainment.

OSIT
 

rrraven

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I noticed that the horses are just gorgeous in the show. And these actors can ride!!
indeed , and no stunt doubles either
from wikipedia

Development process​

Preparations for season 1 began in February 2014. In five months, the stories and drawings were ready. Gambat from Mongolia had drawings made in three months. The teams started their work in May 2014. The decoration and art team consisted of sixty people and worked for 4 months for the first episode. 4000 square meters of fabric were used for costumes and décor. As for the choreography of the show, Nomad, the special choreography crew of movies such as The Expendables 2, 47 Ronin, and Conan the Barbarian, from Kazakhstan, was invited to Turkey. The crew prepared special choreographies for actors, horses, and other scenes. The cast took riding, sword fighting and archery lessons for 3 months. There were 25 horses on the set, attended by a veterinarian, who specially trained them. All are maintained on a horse farm in Riva. A special area similar to a zoo (but on a smaller scale) was created for all the animals which appear in the show, which include gazelles, sheep, goats, nightingales and partridges. The shooting time of the first episode was about a month. A total of 5000 people were cast for all 5 seasons of the show.

Costume designs​

For the series, around 1800 costumes and thousands of war supplies and accessories were made from scratch. The TV series is a milestone in Turkey with respect to its administration of art. Copper and other metallic accessories are accumulated from various parts of Turkey.[11] Nearly everything all over Turkey was 'confiscated', from jewelry to a piece of cloth. Wooden materials were made by hand, one by one.

and some clever cgi like the flock of sheep you can see in some long shots of the village move funny , but you can only see them for a sec
 

Avala

Dagobah Resident
I'll wait and start to watch when Erdogan shows up. Otherwise, not a fan of turkish propaganda :D
 

KTC

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my favorite is Ertugrul's mum
the only drawback is the subtitles , you look away for a sec and miss what was said
I love Hayme too. It took me a while to get my head around all of the characters names but now at the end of season 1 I am well and truly familiar with each character and I stay up later than usual to watch 'just one more episode'.

I enjoy the subtitles because it makes me stop and actually watch. I struggle to focus on a movie or TV show and am usually doing 5 things at once - cooking, sending emails, browsing the net, half watching TV, organising work stuff - so the subtitles give my brain 1 thing to focus on, a bit like reading a book which is relaxing for my high functioning brain.

Ertugul is a bit like reading the romance novels and I make it part of my daily routine when I am at home.
 

Beau

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Yes, Ertugrul's mom is a favorite character of mine. The actress playing her is wonderful, all her disgusted glances and looks of emotion that convey so much. She's a delight. And she's not a Mary Sue either, she makes mistakes and can let her emotions get the best of her. The show also mixes in the comedy amongst all the drama (very appreciated), with the alp Bamsi being a favorite of mine as well for his awesome personality and physical comedy. Really almost all the acting on this show is superb, even the villains are really good at making you hate them. They really know how to cast a bad guy!
 

Nicholas

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I have watched all five seasons now as it was a nightly event for me. I just couldn't wait to watch the next episode! It was thoroughly enjoyable and engaging to watch.

Western shows and movies never really grabbed my attention thus never really was interested. I was just along for the ride in the ones I did watch. Now the Ertugrul series has made this predicament even worse. That is probably a good thing.

Now that I have finished Ertugrul, I was elated to find the next series of Kurulus Osman (one of Ertugrul's sons) to be just as fun and engaging to watch. Following Osman's progress in learning what Ertugrul had to learn but with new twists and turns reinforces the idea that with learning comes suffering and that learning is more than just reading books. One must get out there in the world and suffer this reality in order to learn anything.

I heartily give two thumbs up for both of these series. 👍:perfect:👍
 

luc

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Really almost all the acting on this show is superb, even the villains are really good at making you hate them. They really know how to cast a bad guy!

Yes, I think so too. At the beginning, I thought Ertugrul's actor was a bit worse than the others, but he grew on me (or the actor grew in his role). The one exception I think is Halime, I thought there's not too much going on with her expression-wise. I have only watched the first 2 seasons, but it seems to me the writers didn't quite know what to do with her. Given that she's such an important character in the show, there's not a lot going on... I read about other series how the writers often "fall in love" with a character as the show continues, but also abandon others if they don't know what to do with them - maybe that's what happened with the Halime character? Don't know, just to throw it out there :)
 

Beau

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The one exception I think is Halime, I thought there's not too much going on with her expression-wise. I have only watched the first 2 seasons, but it seems to me the writers didn't quite know what to do with her. Given that she's such an important character in the show, there's not a lot going on... I read about other series how the writers often "fall in love" with a character as the show continues, but also abandon others if they don't know what to do with them - maybe that's what happened with the Halime character?
It's not just you Luc. I kept saying in season 2 how they needed to give Halime something to do. All she was doing was fretting and worrying in her tent, it seemed. I thought there was a lot of potential there with intriguing stories. That was definitely one of my criticisms of the second season.
 

dmnlksm

Padawan Learner
I watched up to Ep 5 from the first season and so far I am captivated by the detail of the script or the production rather. The type? of the production being epic hystoric is using heavy research into the proto otoman tribe life in the XII th century. See the scene with the cow dung being used to whiten the linnen. That reminds me of a history museum I visited in Turkey (pity, the only one), where beside the dioramas, elaborate explanatory notes were attempting to reconstruct the everyday life of the peoples. No wonder in the credits at least three top entries are university professors.
Another captivating aspect is the richness of verbal communication and in the same time the scarcity of dialogue. The entire language is based on hyperbolae, metaphors, comparisons and indirect tone. Second person in direct tone is rarely used and it is to accentuate or emphasize conflictual depictions. I suppose one would need those moments as engaging mechanism otherwise the viewer would fall asleep, fact that happened in my case.
Last captivating aspect is the music and videography, at least for me.

List of museums in Turkey. (not updated) Which museum did you go to?


The structure of the Turkish language is almost like this.

 

Arwenn

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I was searching the net for when the historical Ertugrul died, so imagine my confusion when the link I clicked on said Ertugrul Osman lived mostly in Manhattan and died in Turkey at the ripe age of 97 in 2009. :lol: Turns out he was the last descendant of the Ottoman Empire and was expelled from Turkey when the Turkish Republic was founded. Below is the article from the NY times for reference:

Ertugrul Osman, Link to Ottoman Dynasty, Dies at 97​

Sept. 24, 2009
Ertugrul Osman, who might have ruled the Ottoman empire from a palace in Istanbul, but instead spent most of his life in a walk-up apartment in Manhattan, died Wednesday night in Istanbul. He was 97.

The cause was kidney failure, according to his wife, Zeynep, who was visiting Istanbul with him when he died.
Mr. Osman was a descendant of Osman I, the Anatolian ruler who in 1299 established the kingdom that eventually controlled parts of Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Mr. Osman would have eventually become the Sultan but for the establishment of the Turkish Republic, proclaimed in 1923.

For the last 64 years, Mr. Osman formally His Imperial Highness Prince Ertugrul Osman lived in a rent-controlled apartment in a four-story building on Lexington Avenue in the East 70s. At one time he kept 12 dogs in his home, a two-bedroom unit up a narrow, dim stairway, and enlisted neighborhood children to walk them.
Given the gap between what might have been and what was, Mr. Osman was often asked if he dreamed that the empire would be restored. He always answered, flatly, no.

“I’m a very practical person,” he told The New York Times in 2006. “Democracy works well in Turkey.”

In an interview for Al Jazeera television in 2008, he refused to say an unkind word about Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who led the revolution that deposed his family.

Ali Tayar, an architect from Istanbul and a friend, said in 2006 that Mr. Osman had “no ambitions to return, and he doesn’t want anyone to think he does.”
“But he’s an incredibly important link to Turkey’s past,” Mr. Tayar added.

Born in 1912, Mr. Osman was the last surviving grandson of an Ottoman emperor; his grandfather, Abdul Hamid II, ruled from 1876 to 1909. In 1924, the royal family was expelled by Ataturk, the founder of the Turkish Republic. “The men had one day to leave,” Mr. Osman said. “The women were given a week.”

Mr. Osman attended school in Vienna and moved to New York in 1939. He returned to Turkey for the first time 53 years later, in August 1992, at the invitation of the prime minister. On that trip, he went to see the 285-room Dolmabahce Palace, which had been his grandfather’s home (and where he had played as a child). He insisted on joining a tour group, despite the summer heat. “I didn’t want a fuss,” he said. “I’m not that kind of person.”

As a young man, Mr. Osman ran a mining company, Wells Overseas, which required him to travel frequently to South America. Because he considered himself a citizen of the Ottoman Empire, he refused to carry the passport of any country. Instead, he traveled with a certificate devised by his lawyer. That might have continued to work had security measures not been tightened after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. In 2004, he received a Turkish passport for the first time.

Mr. Osman married Gulda Twerskoy in 1947. She died in 1985. At a party in 1987, he met Zeynep Tarzi Hanim, an Afghan princess. Nearly 30 years his junior, she had been raised in Istanbul and was living in New York. They married in 1991. He has no other survivors.

Mr. Osman often impressed interviewers with his dry wit and knowledge of trends in politics, architecture and pop culture. When Didem Yilmaz, a filmmaker, interviewed Mr. Osman for “Seeking the Sultan,” a short documentary film about him, she expected to find him bitter about his life’s trajectory. Instead, she said, she found him to be “kind, understanding and contemplative.”
At one point, she added, he said to her knowingly, “If I had a bad life, it would be better for your film.”

Correction: Oct. 5, 2009
Because of an editing error, an obituary on Sept. 24 about Ertugrul Osman, a descendant of Turkish royalty, misstated the length of time his second wife, Zeynep, lived with him in a Manhattan apartment and misstated the ownership of 12 dogs that lived there at one time. Ms. Osman has lived there since the couple married in 1991, not “for the last 64 years.” (Mr. Osman had lived in the apartment for that length of time.) And the dogs were owned by Mr. Osman, not by the two of them.
-https://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/24/nyregion/24osman.html
 

Ennio

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The one exception I think is Halime, I thought there's not too much going on with her expression-wise.

I had the same complaint about Halime as she just seemed like a pretty place-holder as an Ertugrul love interest and little else (though I did love their romantic exchanges). I'm currently 2/3rds into the fourth season though, and was pleased as punch to see that more dimensions to Halime's character have been shown, both strengths and weaknesses. The actor who plays Halime really does get to rise to the occasion conveying well a number of very different emotional responses to some fairly intense situations.

And speaking of great characters, Sadettin Köpek might just be one of the greatest portrayals of a psychopathic villain I think I've ever seen - made all the more fleshed-out because we get to see his pathologies played out in a number of different scenarios; from impersonal to more "up-close and personal" (a great benefit of this long-form TV show). If that isn't enough, we get to see him maneuver politically and manipulate people and circumstances as he tries to accrue more power for himself, and as he works to suppress Ertugrul's aims. More than once I thought, "Geezus, this is likely how the levers of political power get used by those sick with ambition...!!". Which leads me to one of the great lessons of the show - which is that many in positions of power are quite ill in their capacity to repeatedly Lie through their teeth, Lie some more to cover up their Lies, and Lie again to consolidate their gains - as easy as it is to breathe.
 

Keit

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The actor who plays Halime really does get to rise to the occasion conveying well a number of very different emotional responses to some fairly intense situations.

Indeed. Without sharing any spoilers, in later seasons the actress does have occasions to show her acting talent. In some scenes she acts in a very genuine and expressive way.

And speaking of great characters, Sadettin Köpek might just be one of the greatest portrayals of a psychopathic villain I think I've ever seen

I agree! It's true that the show has a bunch of pretty caricaturish villains, but Köpek is definitely far from being caricaturish. He is an example of a very smart, versatile and even talented villain.
 
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