Resurrection Ertugrul: An epic with heart and values

Ina

Jedi Council Member
List of museums in Turkey. (not updated) Which museum did you go to?


The structure of the Turkish language is almost like this.

The Alanya Archeological Museum, in Antalya. Exquisite! I would move to Antalya or surrounds in a blink of an eye if we could! Anatolia is a gem!
 

Ina

Jedi Council Member
I was looking for historical paralles in Dirilis Ertugrul, and I found the work of an islamic history enthusiast of indian origin living in UK. In four parts he attempts to answer the question Is Diriliş: Ertuğrul Historically Accurate? I read the first part and I found his analysis systematic and his reporting light- conversational and at times witty-humorous. I believe it could be very easy for anyone interested to find more historical facts to start from the blog (not talking about the hyperlinks in the text, though).
Below is the address of the blog.
Is Diriliş: Ertuğrul historically accurate? (Part 1 - The Kayi Tribe) — Ammar ibn Aziz Ahmed
Just as a cautionary note, I am not recommending the contents of the entire website or any other affiliated entities such as Centre for Islamic Studies, as these are different issues and alltogether beyond my depth.
 

Voyageur

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Some of the actors (Ertugrul's alps) also visited Chechnya and were treated like royalty. His third son Adam also played a small role in the series.
Had to laugh at the videos, the Chechen, Alp Ramzan Akhmadovich Kadyrov, or is that Kadyrov Bey. He seemed to be having some fun:

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Alp Bamsı, along with Alp's Turgut and Abdurrahman were also there (and others):

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I noticed that the horses are just gorgeous in the show. And these actors can ride!!
Agree, this was one of the aspects of the show that has been wonderful; such great horsemanship and horses.
Turns out he was the last descendant of the Ottoman Empire and was expelled from Turkey when the Turkish Republic was founded. Below is the article from the NY times for reference:
Fascinating, would not have thought. In the article Osman had answered: "Given the gap between what might have been and what was, Mr. Osman was often asked if he dreamed that the empire would be restored. He always answered, flatly, no.
 

Jones

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The development of Selcan's character has been interesting in that she starts out as one of the trouble makers in her desire and scheming to see Gundogdu's position advanced and her sister Gocke married off to Ertugrul all the while blaming Halime for bringing trouble to the tribe. Through that she ends up aligning with traitors in the tribe. When all of the scheming comes crashing down on her and she realises that she has caused harm, Ibn Arabi advises her to confess and ask forgiveness from those that she has harmed, which she does. That doesn't mean the end of her struggle though because now she's in the position to detect her own games in others who are a threat to the tribe, but because of her history, no-one believes her.

So she's in a similar situation to Ertugrul where she feels compelled to act on what she percieves in the face of great opposition from those who don't perceive the same dynamics at large or who have a vested interest in protecting the dynamic. Though Selcan has additional opposition from those who think she's just playing her old games. Ertugral has the support of his Alps, but Selcan is pretty much on her own initially even though Hayme continues to love her as a daughter and Halime also becomes a friend. Unlike Ertugrul, Selcan doesn't have the same emotional control which sees her prone to less considered outbursts.

There've been a few times when I've laughed out loud at Selcan because she has a similar facial expressiveness to Rowan Atkinson. I've heard him referred to as rubber face because of the agility, flexibility and range of his facial expressions. Selcan can't hide what she's thinking and feeling from her face and in one dinner scene where a set up is being planned to out traitors that Selcan has been aware of and has attempted to out in the past, everyone else is controlling expression and action to make things seem as normal as possible in alignment to the customs of hospitality then the camera pans to Selcan and her contempt and disrespect for the traitors is writ large on her face and in her body language. It probably wasn't mean't to be comical, and finding humour in it is probably related to the association of facial expression to Rowan Atkinson.

I'm about 3/4 of the way through the second season and am interested to watch how things evolve with Selcan as she seems to be a character that's moving from zero to unlikely hero and showing some of the obstacles and hurdles on that path.
 

Arwenn

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Fascinating, would not have thought. In the article Osman had answered: "Given the gap between what might have been and what was, Mr. Osman was often asked if he dreamed that the empire would be restored. He always answered, flatly, no.
I thought it was honourable that he accepted his fate with such equanimity. Ertugrul Osman might not have had designs on being a Sultan, but I think Erdogan would like to see himself as one lol.

I'm about 3/4 of the way through the second season
I’m early in the second season, and I have to say I’m not enjoying it at all thus far. There’s way too much drama and not enough Ibn Arabi. I’ll persevere, but the villains are really villainous and Noyen is just plain annoyen (apologies for the pun) & Bamsi hasn’t made an appearance yet. I almost miss the villains from last season!

As for the other characters, I concur with you guys. I love Hayme’s character (& how well the actress plays the part) & Wild Demir’s. It undoes me when he cries.😔 Selcan does look set to have an interesting character arc this season, and yeah if looks could kill! Her facial expressions say more than words sometimes!
 
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rrraven

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it occurred:-) to me that when the kid translated Ertugrul name meaning valiant man that Ertugrul as son of a tribal''king'' is Prince Valiant !
 

Keit

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I’m early in the second season, and I have to say I’m not enjoying it at all thus far. There’s way too much drama and not enough Ibn Arabi. I’ll persevere, but the villains are really villainous and Noyen is just plain annoyen (apologies for the pun) & Bamsi hasn’t made an appearance yet. I almost miss the villains from last season!

I also had the same feeling and thoughts after watching the first episodes of the second season. Although you can see that they started to use drones, so the shooting angles were much more cool, the general feeling was that the show became darker and too much bad things were happening one after another.

I even searched online about it, because I definitely didn't want to waste my time if they went the "Game of Thrones" way. But I decided to be patient because what I was able to read, that apparently they shot some extra episodes more than it was initially planned (the season has over 100 episodes in 45 min format) because they introduced the show to the Western market. Netflix and such. So it's quite possible that this was the reason to the increased dark tone.

Apparently other people also wondered about it, and the answer was to be patient, and that apparently after the 25th or so episode they return to their normal portrayal. You can also see that the narrative drags a bit until then. 🤷
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The development of Selcan's character has been interesting in that she starts out as one of the trouble makers in her desire and scheming to see Gundogdu's position advanced and her sister Gocke married off to Ertugrul all the while blaming Halime for bringing trouble to the tribe. Through that she ends up aligning with traitors in the tribe. When all of the scheming comes crashing down on her and she realises that she has caused harm, Ibn Arabi advises her to confess and ask forgiveness from those that she has harmed, which she does. That doesn't mean the end of her struggle though because now she's in the position to detect her own games in others who are a threat to the tribe, but because of her history, no-one believes her.

So she's in a similar situation to Ertugrul where she feels compelled to act on what she percieves in the face of great opposition from those who don't perceive the same dynamics at large or who have a vested interest in protecting the dynamic. Though Selcan has additional opposition from those who think she's just playing her old games. Ertugral has the support of his Alps, but Selcan is pretty much on her own initially even though Hayme continues to love her as a daughter and Halime also becomes a friend. Unlike Ertugrul, Selcan doesn't have the same emotional control which sees her prone to less considered outbursts.

There've been a few times when I've laughed out loud at Selcan because she has a similar facial expressiveness to Rowan Atkinson. I've heard him referred to as rubber face because of the agility, flexibility and range of his facial expressions. Selcan can't hide what she's thinking and feeling from her face and in one dinner scene where a set up is being planned to out traitors that Selcan has been aware of and has attempted to out in the past, everyone else is controlling expression and action to make things seem as normal as possible in alignment to the customs of hospitality then the camera pans to Selcan and her contempt and disrespect for the traitors is writ large on her face and in her body language. It probably wasn't mean't to be comical, and finding humour in it is probably related to the association of facial expression to Rowan Atkinson.

I'm about 3/4 of the way through the second season and am interested to watch how things evolve with Selcan as she seems to be a character that's moving from zero to unlikely hero and showing some of the obstacles and hurdles on that path.
I think the actor who plays Selcan is terrific, if not the best of them all. It's amazing how well she can portray the various mental states and emotions her character is going through. I'm now on season 3, and I kind'a miss Selcan since she doesn't feature in that season.

The other day I came to think of something that we here all know, but what is depicted very well in the series and repeated to the point of being almost painful to watch. That is, the phenomenon we see all the time today around us and in large scale geopolitical 'games': anyone, especially someone gaining attention, who is trying to make things right by pursuing justice, fairness and compassion is seen as a troublemaker. They are seen as troublemakers, of course, by the manipulators and psychopaths but also by the less aware and more naive 'normal' people. Heck, the 'normal' people fight tooth and nail to defend the psychos no matter what facts are presented. Well, in the series some finally 'wake up' after some experience that make them 'see', and the sad thing is that this is seldom anything we see in today's world.

Another thing that is exemplified excellently in the series is how the evil doing psychopaths – the nastiest ones – never give up their grandiose view of themselves, projecting (blaiming others for what they do), anger and contempt even when faced with death. As we know, psychopathy is virtually an incurable trait. No one should have any illusions of 'converting' or 'healing' a psychopath – they will remain the same until their deaths.
 

dredger

Jedi Master
The other day I came to think of something that we here all know, but what is depicted very well in the series and repeated to the point of being almost painful to watch. That is, the phenomenon we see all the time today around us and in large scale geopolitical 'games': anyone, especially someone gaining attention, who is trying to make things right by pursuing justice, fairness and compassion is seen as a troublemaker. They are seen as troublemakers, of course, by the manipulators and psychopaths but also by the less aware and more naive 'normal' people. Heck, the 'normal' people fight tooth and nail to defend the psychos no matter what facts are presented. Well, in the series some finally 'wake up' after some experience that make them 'see', and the sad thing is that this is seldom anything we see in today's world.
Yes, the series gives a good image of what is happening now on earth, as we are all subject to a worldwide exercice (or lesson) with this covid story brought by our (sadly well real) psychopaths. This remind me the comment my colleague wrote me on our internal chat, which was one of his conclusion after having finished the series, i copy/paste it again here : The series has taught me a lot of things and the thing that has marked me the most is that one must always stay on the side of the good guys, no matter who is facing and what the consequences are
Indeed, the series help us, or at least mysef and visibly my colleague,, to resist and remain a righteous person. The only word that comes to my mind here is "inspiration". This series, mainly Ertugrul (but also others, like one i much liked in season 3 : Aliyar, i won't spoil more :whistle: ), is a great lesson of inspiration, of what heroes can bring for good. And the lenght of the series can be seen as a long example which allow for many people to get inspired (as i suppose that ... the sensitivity to be inspired is different from one to the other, so a long series is helpful to ... achieve the job :lol: ).
If we can vote for some next questions to the C's, then ... i would vote for this one : Was the Ertugrul series inspired by you (the C's) ? :-[
 
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Ina

Jedi Council Member
Yes, the series gives a good image of what is happening now on earth, as we are all subject to a worldwide exercice (or lesson) with this covid story brought by our (sadly well real) psychopaths. This remind me the comment a micro scale my colleague wrote me on our internal chat, which was one of his conclusion after having finished the series, i copy/paste it again here : The series has taught me a lot of things and the thing that has marked me the most is that one must always stay on the side of the good guys, no matter who is facing and what the consequences are
Indeed, the series help us, or at least mysef and visibly my colleague,, to resist and remain a righteous person. The only word that comes to my mind here is "inspiration". This series, mainly Ertugrul (but also others, like one i much liked in season 3 : Aliyar, i won't spoil more :whistle: ), is a great lesson of inspiration, of what heroes can bring for good. And the lenght of the series can be seen as a long example which allow for many people to get inspired (as i suppose that ... the sensitivity to be inspired is different from one to the other, so a long series is helpful to ... achieve the job :lol: ).
If we can vote for some next questions to the C's, then ... i would vote for this one : Was the Ertugrul series inspired by you (the C's) ? :-[
What you say rings true for me. It is important that the series is almost ‘ongoing’ lengthwise. The theme, the ever-migratory state is still very much current, albeit practiced at a micro scale, or not so micro as we recently experienced. The values might still be there but like you said, you get repeated inspirational moments to fondly remember those values.
I would agree with the question for the C’s.
 

Voyageur

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Currently, at the end of season II, although the end seems slightly elusive as it keeps going on (and there is a lot going on). There was one scene wherein Ibn Arabi stands in front of Noyan where they eye each other up - not a word said. Good scene. All this is in and around Turgut's inner turmoil as justice was not carried out the way it might have be intended at the time. This is a hard reflective moment for him, and it carries on.
 

Voyageur

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Sometimes the script presents dialogue that is perfect (here Dr. George Simon would approve), and in this particular case, Mother Hayme (Hayme Hatun) glances over to look and speak to the wife of Ural Bey, Çolpan Hatun, and with a steady knowing voice says to her;

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Brava, Mother Hayme!
 
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