Session 15 October 2016

luc

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
I think that one of the most important things to do before getting a pet is to decide what you want, expect, and can give in the pet-human relationship. Then, think logically and coolly about the kind of dog that fits in that slot. You need to consider space available vs the size and energy of the dog. You need to consider your time available and how much you are at home. How much energy do YOU have to give?

Some people seem to have some "self image" fantasy of themselves and their trusty dog of one sort or another... maybe they read about such a dog in a book, or saw it in a movie, or somebody else had such a dog and it looked good. So, they imagine themselves with this type of dog without giving one minute of thought to the reality.

The worst thing I see over and over again is people trying to make house pets out of hunting type dogs. Herding dogs are great family dogs if you have the space for them. They don't do well in apartments or small places. They like to have work to do.

There are some very small dogs that are able to entertain themselves a good deal if provided for, that are okay in small places where the person has minimal time and energy to give, but still, the dog needs a person to BE THERE too. If you can't be there, don't torture a critter by locking them up alone in a house or apartment all day.

Remember that a pet is a companion - that means keeping each other company. So figure out what you like and do and find the dog that is the right fit.
Thanks Laura, this makes a lot of sense. We are toying with the idea of getting a hunting-type dog for quite a while, but didn't do it so far for many of the reasons you gave. If we were to get one, we surely would go to a hunting dog training class and do the necessary official audit/test so that we can actually use it for hunting. Needless to say, that's a huge commitment, you have to go to classes every weekend for months, do the audit, and train the dog as much as possible in your free time. You also need to have a firm authority over such a dog, not spoil it, not give in etc., all very difficult. Of course, for that you need to spend a lot of time with it. Anything less is cruel for hunting dogs and will lead to many problems, and that's why so far we have decided against it.

I've seen it again and again how hunting dogs are bought as mere pets, and they become unfulfilled and problematic. In one case we know, the dog suddenly started chasing deer for miles and killed it, with the owners totally helpless. Another common problem for terrier and dachshund type dogs is that they chase and enter foxholes (that's their very purpose!), where they can die quickly either by being killed by the fox/badger or by getting stuck, especially if untrained. It's really not a good idea to have such a dog just because 'he looks sweet'.
 

Yas

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
I think that one of the most important things to do before getting a pet is to decide what you want, expect, and can give in the pet-human relationship. Then, think logically and coolly about the kind of dog that fits in that slot. You need to consider space available vs the size and energy of the dog. You need to consider your time available and how much you are at home. How much energy do YOU have to give?

Some people seem to have some "self image" fantasy of themselves and their trusty dog of one sort or another... maybe they read about such a dog in a book, or saw it in a movie, or somebody else had such a dog and it looked good. So, they imagine themselves with this type of dog without giving one minute of thought to the reality.

The worst thing I see over and over again is people trying to make house pets out of hunting type dogs. Herding dogs are great family dogs if you have the space for them. They don't do well in apartments or small places. They like to have work to do.

There are some very small dogs that are able to entertain themselves a good deal if provided for, that are okay in small places where the person has minimal time and energy to give, but still, the dog needs a person to BE THERE too. If you can't be there, don't torture a critter by locking them up alone in a house or apartment all day.

Remember that a pet is a companion - that means keeping each other company. So figure out what you like and do and find the dog that is the right fit.
Thank you for your answer, Laura. You are so right. And this is precisely what I was considering when I was in the process of thinking about whether it was good to have a dog or not. I certainly didn't think of it in terms of "oh, I want a dog" and then went and got one. I read about different breeds and how well they adapt to small places, an also thought about how realistic it was my idea that I could be there for the pup and how much energy I could spend with her. For me, animals aren't toys they are beings, and as such, it is a big responsibility to have one as a pet.

I am a busy person, but I do spend a lot of time at home. When I'm not at home, I don't leave the puppy alone, I take her to a friend's house who lives nearby and has many other animals. My apartment is small, but there is a garden downstairs where she can play under supervision and there are children living there who love to play with her. So these are the things that made me think that she'll be OK. Yet, since it isn't a pure breed dog, I don't know what her size would be, I saw her mother, but not her father. According to the vet, she'll be a medium-size dog.

What does ring an alarm, though, is why I decided to adopt her instead of waiting until I could find the right breed (a small one, known to adapt well to small places). Here is where honesty is important for a better assessment. I wanted to buy a breed dog because of this considerations, but then felt compelled to adopt one because other people said that I shouldn't buy a dog, but adopt one instead... because so many dogs are homeless. So instead of doing what I thought was the right thing for my conditions, I followed other people's view. And it was a bit of a hurried choice too.

I guess I'll have to observe her and myself and decide if she'll actually be OK or if it will be better to find another home for her. I already thought about this and, although it would be sad to part, if that's the best, I'll be happy to know that she'll be better somewhere else.
 

idiaysan

Padawan Learner
Thank you very much for the new Session!
It is wonderful, as always.
I hope that Siberia will be a good choice to live, others also think about moving there in the future. Maybe it would be a safe place near Lake Bakal? or, this is a very energetic charge point? What do you think?

a big hug! :hug2: and again thanks for your work!
 
Laura said:
I think that one of the most important things to do before getting a pet is to decide what you want, expect, and can give in the pet-human relationship. Then, think logically and coolly about the kind of dog that fits in that slot. You need to consider space available vs the size and energy of the dog. You need to consider your time available and how much you are at home. How much energy do YOU have to give?

Some people seem to have some "self image" fantasy of themselves and their trusty dog of one sort or another... maybe they read about such a dog in a book, or saw it in a movie, or somebody else had such a dog and it looked good. So, they imagine themselves with this type of dog without giving one minute of thought to the reality.

The worst thing I see over and over again is people trying to make house pets out of hunting type dogs. Herding dogs are great family dogs if you have the space for them. They don't do well in apartments or small places. They like to have work to do.

There are some very small dogs that are able to entertain themselves a good deal if provided for, that are okay in small places where the person has minimal time and energy to give, but still, the dog needs a person to BE THERE too. If you can't be there, don't torture a critter by locking them up alone in a house or apartment all day.

Remember that a pet is a companion - that means keeping each other company. So figure out what you like and do and find the dog that is the right fit.

The choice to own a creature from 2D has for me the similar meaning as the choice between 3D and 3D. It is important to know the reasons for choosing an animal. Equally important is why a person decides for a partner or a friend. I have a labrador and am on the way with about 14 dogs on Sundays. It is amazing, for what reasons the humans had decided for the respective dogs, how humans represent themselves and how the respective dog owners present themselves in the human vortex.
Half of these dogs would be a danger to the owners if they did not use the dogs with long regular walks. At the purchase only 3 owners had informed in advance about the dog. 11 dogs came from the animal shelter, of which 6 owners were not known, which develops from the puppies.
I was at the beginning "outsider", since my dog came from a breed. The talks were usually about the willingness to help, the selflessness of the owners. Everyone wanted to be more social. But in the further discussions it became clear, that only in the rarest cases for a dog from the shelter had decided for social reasons, it was purely financial reasons. Of 14 dogs, only 3 are pure-bred.
Self-actors / narcissists actually have identical dogs and try to give their dog in the pack the leadership position. In case of misconduct of the dog always other dogs were the cause. I have learned a lot in this group about social behavior man and animal.
When I was a child, we had a hybrid that was only in the kennel. He felt sorry for me, there was no job for him, no one was interested in him. By his way of life he had become dangerous and they could not go for a walk. My narcissistic father simply wanted a dog that was dangerous. Then came a doberman. My father took the puppy, who was standing in the corner, isolated and outsider in the pack. The dog exactly reflected my father: power, disobedience, dominance. This dog was a weapon. Dangerous. I had to take care of him, even though I was afraid. My father bragged only with his fighting dog and the care was my job. Then came the day when the dog caught my little sister and even today she says: If you had not come, he would have killed me. My father laughed at it and ridiculed her. When I was 14 our dog fell out of the blue for no reason and I lay with heavy bite wounds on the face and hands 4 weeks in the hospital.
Even after this incident, father blamed me and was furious that the dog was subsequently shot.
Now we have a Labrador for 10 years, the center of our family.
There were many criteria which breed was selected. In the first place, it was only a race which, by its very nature, had no aggressive structure at all. Since my practice is in the house and many foreign people enter and leave, he was not allowed to protect any area. No hunting for a hunting dog. It should be very human and not nervous in character. Like no dog from the shelter, since I did not know what such an animal had experienced. My children were still small and I had to have the security that they were best protected from the dog when they were alone with him. The choice fell on a Labrador. My ex husband, who had very high psychopathic and narcissistic proportions, put himself on the little puppy with 120kg and said: He has to learn that I am the boss here. He must be afraid of me. The little fellow was trembling all over and I got such anger. Just as my ex-husband showed us that we must be afraid of him, he tried to subdue the dog who was afraid of him from that time. Our dog is the friendliest being that I know, everyone who enters our house is overwhelmed with his love.

But when my ex-husband moved out, the dog never took notice of him when he came in. Just as we do not pay attention to it. Today he has no more power over us. Our dog gave us security and love when we were sad. He dances with us when we are happy. We try to give him back what he gives us with his peace, joy

But when my ex-husband moved out, the dog never took notice of him when he came in. Just as we do not pay attention to it. Today he has no more power over us. Our dog gave us security and love when we were sad. He dances with us when we are happy. We try to give him back what he gives us with his peace, joy and nature.
 

Rose7

Padawan Learner
Dear Laura and crew,

I just received my beautiful crystals and dream stone! I am so excited, thank you very much! Because it is the evening I will do the Daily Reading 2 tonight. I will have to learn "In the Garden" as well so I can sing it to them. (though, I think you talk to stones?) I will re read the transcripts to get more clear. Thank you again!
 

whitecoast

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
(L) Alright, we're still working on our crystals at periodic intervals whenever my leg is ready. We want to thank you for that kind of assistance.
I wanted to ask... are requests for programmed crystals still being taken? :/
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Je suis la très heureuse "Maman" de deux petits Yorks, Hella, 4 ans et 6 mois, Ugo, 14 ans le 02/01 prochain, voilà 30 ans que plusieurs générations de Yorks m'accompagnent dans ma vie et me comblent de bonheur, je suis handicapée et ce sont de merveilleux petits chiens qui me tiennent compagnie à chaque instant... J'ai aussi 3 chatonnes, Gaby et Granie, deux petits bébés récupérés à la SPA, 5 ans et 3 mois aujourd'hui ainsi qu'une Siamoise, Isatis, 3 ans et 5 mois et aussi Duchesse, la chatonne de ma Maman que j'ai adoptée quand Maman nous a quittés le 7 mars 2015... Tout ce petit monde s'entend bien et m'apporte, joie, affection, douceur, tendresse et tant de plaisir...

I am very happy "Mommy" two small Yorks, Hella, 4 years and 6 months, Ugo, 14 next 02/01, 30 years ago that several generations of Yorks accompany me in my life and fill me with happiness I am disabled and they are wonderful little dogs that keep me company at every moment ... I also chatonnes 3, Gaby and Granie two little babies recovered at the SPA, 5 years and 3 months and today that a Siamese, Isatis, 3 years and 5 months and also Duchess, the kitten to my Mom that I adopted when Mom passed away March 7, 2015 ... this little world gets along well and brings me, joy, affection, gentleness, tenderness and so much fun ...
 

Gawan

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Jean d`arc said:
The choice to own a creature from 2D has for me the similar meaning as the choice between 3D and 3D. It is important to know the reasons for choosing an animal. Equally important is why a person decides for a partner or a friend. I have a labrador and am on the way with about 14 dogs on Sundays. It is amazing, for what reasons the humans had decided for the respective dogs, how humans represent themselves and how the respective dog owners present themselves in the human vortex.
Half of these dogs would be a danger to the owners if they did not use the dogs with long regular walks. At the purchase only 3 owners had informed in advance about the dog. 11 dogs came from the animal shelter, of which 6 owners were not known, which develops from the puppies.
I was at the beginning "outsider", since my dog came from a breed. The talks were usually about the willingness to help, the selflessness of the owners. Everyone wanted to be more social. But in the further discussions it became clear, that only in the rarest cases for a dog from the shelter had decided for social reasons, it was purely financial reasons. Of 14 dogs, only 3 are pure-bred.
Self-actors / narcissists actually have identical dogs and try to give their dog in the pack the leadership position. In case of misconduct of the dog always other dogs were the cause. I have learned a lot in this group about social behavior man and animal.
When I was a child, we had a hybrid that was only in the kennel. He felt sorry for me, there was no job for him, no one was interested in him. By his way of life he had become dangerous and they could not go for a walk. My narcissistic father simply wanted a dog that was dangerous. Then came a doberman. My father took the puppy, who was standing in the corner, isolated and outsider in the pack. The dog exactly reflected my father: power, disobedience, dominance. This dog was a weapon. Dangerous. I had to take care of him, even though I was afraid. My father bragged only with his fighting dog and the care was my job. Then came the day when the dog caught my little sister and even today she says: If you had not come, he would have killed me. My father laughed at it and ridiculed her. When I was 14 our dog fell out of the blue for no reason and I lay with heavy bite wounds on the face and hands 4 weeks in the hospital.
Even after this incident, father blamed me and was furious that the dog was subsequently shot.
Now we have a Labrador for 10 years, the center of our family.
There were many criteria which breed was selected. In the first place, it was only a race which, by its very nature, had no aggressive structure at all. Since my practice is in the house and many foreign people enter and leave, he was not allowed to protect any area. No hunting for a hunting dog. It should be very human and not nervous in character. Like no dog from the shelter, since I did not know what such an animal had experienced. My children were still small and I had to have the security that they were best protected from the dog when they were alone with him. The choice fell on a Labrador. My ex husband, who had very high psychopathic and narcissistic proportions, put himself on the little puppy with 120kg and said: He has to learn that I am the boss here. He must be afraid of me. The little fellow was trembling all over and I got such anger. Just as my ex-husband showed us that we must be afraid of him, he tried to subdue the dog who was afraid of him from that time. Our dog is the friendliest being that I know, everyone who enters our house is overwhelmed with his love.

But when my ex-husband moved out, the dog never took notice of him when he came in. Just as we do not pay attention to it. Today he has no more power over us. Our dog gave us security and love when we were sad. He dances with us when we are happy. We try to give him back what he gives us with his peace, joy

But when my ex-husband moved out, the dog never took notice of him when he came in. Just as we do not pay attention to it. Today he has no more power over us. Our dog gave us security and love when we were sad. He dances with us when we are happy. We try to give him back what he gives us with his peace, joy and nature.
Thank you for sharing and it is indeed a sad story about your father and about your husband and what you all have gone through. Luckily you all found a hearted companion, because animals can be very helpful also on the psychological level.

Generally it is interesting how animals reflect their owners and vice versa and what people chose for animals for themself.
 

Marina9

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Gawan said:
Thank you for sharing and it is indeed a sad story about your father and about your husband and what you all have gone through. Luckily you all found a hearted companion, because animals can be very helpful also on the psychological level.

Generally it is interesting how animals reflect their owners and vice versa and what people chose for animals for themself.
I was thinking about this with the doggies we have at home, and found it very true. We have three doggies, Hariff, Nogah and Obi Wan Kenobi :lol: Before finding Obi outside the supermarket, I was very attached to Hariff, and he is a very serious dog, like a bit grumpy and it used to be my favourite dog, and realizing this made me think that in that time I was very grumpy too haha. Nogah is quite old now and has some hip problems so she doesn't do much :( When I found Obi I had just come back from a trip to Asia, my brother and sister in law where not in the country and my mom was leaving too for a trip, I was starting therapy and working things out, so things where a bit chaotic in that time. Obi Wan was like a gift, he is now my favourite dog, and he is all happy and silly, he definitely has helped me, and it's funny cause whenever I feel "down" he is following me everywhere or being at my room :love: and when I'm ok he does his own business. We say he is like a little light in the house :)
 

Hindsight Man

Jedi Master
Divide By Zero said:
I'm confused.

How is Rasputin associated with Genghis Khan and Hitler knowing that his story was manipulated?
https://www.sott.net/article/333131-Why-Tsar-Nicholas-II-points-the-way-to-the-restoration-of-Christian-values
It's likely that there was some ''contamination'' there due to the receiver's own bias and/or knowledge limitations.I remember I came across a doc about Genghis khan which made me see him somewhat differently.However these individuals were probably also used due to popular conception of them being ''big bad'' and were used as an example by Ra to approximate 4d sts candidate.
 

etezete

Jedi Master
ooops I just realized I still haven't thanked the chateau-Team for this wonderful new session. Thank you all!
 
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