Session 20 August 2011

stellar

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Graalsword said:
Laura said:
Q: (L) Yes. (Burma) So it sounds like they're saying that there's a hidden thing in the whole resurrection or salvation by the blood thing. That agriculture is evil and we could return by going on an animal-based diet?

A: No not exactly. When humankind "fell" into gross matter, a way was needed to return. This way simply is a manifestation of the natural laws. Consciousness must "eat" also. This is a natural function of the life giving nature of the environment in balance. The Earth is the Great Mother who gives her body, literally, in the form of creatures with a certain level of consciousness for the sustenance of her children of the cosmos. This is the original meaning of those sayings.

Q: (L) So, eating flesh also means eating consciousness which accumulates, I'm assuming is what is being implied here, or what feeds our consciousness so that it grows in step with our bodies? Is that close?

A: Close enough.

I was thinking about it and the question I have in mind is: The children of the cosmos would be only potentially souled people? or OPs and carnivore animals too? For instance, felines, canines, dolphins, eagles, they all eat meat, and seem to be more intelligent than most herbivore animals, and even show some kind of incipient individuality.
Yup, eat meat; the 'smart' food. :lol:
 

ScioAgapeOmnis

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Deedlet said:
Yes, I always found that odd too. It's also interesting that most Hindus consider the cow 'sacred' and don't eat beef because of it.
And look where that got Israeli and Indian societies!
 
I

Infiniteness

Guest
Deedlet said:
Stellaria_graminea said:
Oxajil said:
Isn't it interesting how there are religious restrictions on consuming pork? The programming is so strong, that some people literally go ''Eww'' when you talk about it, and these are people who never even tried it. If you ask them why their religion has restricted it, some say: "pigs play in the mud and eat their own feces, they're dirty", and I'm like....... speechless.

Yes, I was thinking of that, too!

At least nowadays, that accounts.

One of the old norse gods, Frøy, had a boar as his sacred animal. The people was eating their sacred animals back then, at least in that part of the world. There's descriptions of horse meat being eaten as part of their religion, too.

Yes, I always found that odd too. It's also interesting that most Hindus consider the cow 'sacred' and don't eat beef because of it.

Sikhism, my former religion restricts all meat/egg consumption. That is if you are a baptized/Khalsa Sikh. There main staples are wheat, dairy, and vegetables, talk about a unhealthy diet! There are also other rules/restrictions like not being aloud to cut ones hair.

In general I have noticed when I am sitting with Indian folks that are from India, they tend to spread a lot of rumors/gossip. Many times I have observed that the person talking is flat out lying. It seems they do it unintentionally, they don't even ask for proof when they are listening to one another. Sometimes I ask my father, did you know, that guy was lying through his teeth and my father says "yea I know were just gossiping, all Indians do it" :huh:. Mostly they tend to do it with trivial things. Then again I could be wrong, I am not saying that all Indians folks are this way but there seems to be a trend, at least with some of the folks that I am come across.
 
Perhaps I may be chastised for posting this , but, I feel as though the discourse with francois & discussing the french manner of debate , just may, have "hijacked" the whole Original posts' topic.

Perhaps a topic with a new subject might be more appropriate to discuss Francois' views & the responses pertaining to his views, rather in this topic would be a better thing to do.
and a return to the seesion would be more interesting to many, ...
just my "opinion.

;)

JB/MnSportsman
 
MnSportsman,

You are right.

I have understood that almost all my posts were just noise (as said several times to me). And I apologize for that.
However I was not expected all the long comments on French stuff. At the end I just did personally few short answers because I felt I have to do, but perhaps again a stupid idea...

And I understand very well you say that this kind of discourse, just may, have "hijacked the whole original posts' topic. My first post on French stuff has created this incident, I apologize again for that.

I personally decided to only send few posts henceforth with no noise but value added, because all I posted previously has a negative aura and no value for others.
 

anart

A Disturbance in the Force
François said:
MnSportsman,

You are right.

I have understood that almost all my posts were just noise (as said several times to me). And I apologize for that.
However I was not expected all the long comments on French stuff. At the end I just did personally few short answers because I felt I have to do, but perhaps again a stupid idea...

And I understand very well you say that this kind of discourse, just may, have "hijacked the whole original posts' topic. My first post on French stuff has created this incident, I apologize again for that.

I personally decided to only send few posts henceforth with no noise but value added, because all I posted previously has a negative aura and no value for others.

Francois, that's not true. It's been of enormous benefit - just look at the fascinating and elucidating discussion that has resulted! That's how it works, we learn through each other and with each other. We'll see about branching off the posts tomorrow if it's decided that's best. Don't worry Francois, it's no reflection on you.
 
anart,

Sorry, perhaps I need to 'digest' something. By chance my favorite pieces of Classical Music bring me serenity at the current moment...

anart said:
we learn through each other and with each other
I think so.
 
wow incredible..
thank you very much..

We learn a lot, in a few lines.. n' we have to digest much..

Ps. its funny, because when i make my bathroom, somebody say me,(a feng shuy master) in the feng shuy accommodation, you muss put always the miroir in front of the door....
and i've do that... but when the door it's open, we have the more big window of our house in front of the same miroir... n' sometimes, I listening like strange noises, n' especially when
i'm in the bathroom, alone in the house and when i'm alone i never close the door.. it's just crazy, i believe that a lot, thanks ...


sorry my english is not perfect..
 

Vulcan59

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Hi freesurfer,

Welcome to the forum. :) We recommend all new members to post an introduction in the Newbies section telling us a bit about themselves, and how they found their way here. Have a read through that section to get an idea of how others have done it. Thanks.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
MnSportsman said:
Perhaps I may be chastised for posting this , but, I feel as though the discourse with francois & discussing the french manner of debate , just may, have "hijacked" the whole Original posts' topic.

Perhaps a topic with a new subject might be more appropriate to discuss Francois' views & the responses pertaining to his views, rather in this topic would be a better thing to do.
and a return to the seesion would be more interesting to many, ...
just my "opinion.

;)

JB/MnSportsman

Actually, since the Cs made the remark they did about the French educational system, it is entirely on topic to discuss that in this thread.
 

Chu

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
François said:
Laura said:
Quote from:
François on Today at 11:05:53 PM said:
If I want to know who I am as individual of a nation it seems to me that the right way is to become acquainted with how foreigners (*) describe me otherwise it is a critical self-analysis and there is a credibility gap.

* of course the foreigner must be identified as a reliable source recognized by his peers


Soooooo French!

Laura,

I was thinking this was common sense, but if you answer that way, I am wrong.

And can you try to see why you were wrong? Not trying to nitpick at you, but to encourage you to really try to understand more about this "French mentality". It's hard when you are in it, but it's a good exercise! This is an important discussion for everyone, Francois, so don't feel bad!
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Ailén said:
François said:
Laura said:
Quote from:
François on Today at 11:05:53 PM said:
If I want to know who I am as individual of a nation it seems to me that the right way is to become acquainted with how foreigners (*) describe me otherwise it is a critical self-analysis and there is a credibility gap.

* of course the foreigner must be identified as a reliable source recognized by his peers


Soooooo French!

Laura,

I was thinking this was common sense, but if you answer that way, I am wrong.

And can you try to see why you were wrong? Not trying to nitpick at you, but to encourage you to really try to understand more about this "French mentality". It's hard when you are in it, but it's a good exercise! This is an important discussion for everyone, Francois, so don't feel bad!

I would say that it is certainly true that one needs to hear how foreigners describe us, how they see us, in order to gain some insight into our national characteristics; but that is only part of the story.

What struck me as so funny and so typically French was the add-on: "of course the foreigner must be identified as a reliable source recognized by his peers"

Hearing what others think of you/me as a culture can be accurate or grossly inaccurate whether the person is a "reliable source recognized by his peers" or not. I've heard some really bad assessments of the French made by supposedly reliable sources recognized by their peers; in some cases, it sounded almost like racism. Things like "cowardly surrender monkeys" that were being spouted by the previous U.S. Administration come to mind.

When you think about it, probably one of the better ways to understand one's own culture is to get immersed in another one and observe and compare in your own mind until you distill out some things. Notice what they do as opposed to what you do in specific situations. At that point, you can't really know which is better or just different, you can just know that there IS a difference.

I started out thinking that France MUST be superior to the U.S. simply because I was so disgusted with the U.S. warmongering and, at the time, France was refusing to get involved in taking down the Iraqi regime. I didn't see that as being "cowardly surrender monkeys" but rather as taking a reasonable, moral stance with courage in the face of enormous pressure from the immoral U.S.

So, naturally, I saw everything the French did as better and superior.

That's probably why I was so shocked to realize over time (and via personal experience) that the French really are xenophobic and irrational - despite all their claims to being intellectual and rational. There are so many things about France that are irrational that I've actually lost count.

I couldn't understand WHY this was, I just observed it. I wanted to know WHY? I've been thinking about it, speculating about it out loud to family and friends for a few years, and observing even more closely. How can it be that a nation of people can be so downright unfriendly and irritating and personally immoral (from my point of view) and, at the same time, have a "culture" and cuisine and certain features of their society that are so positive (again, my opinion based on observation)??? Why is it everyone wants to bash the French and, at the same time, spend their holidays here? That didn't make sense to me.

Of course, I do have a little bit of a similar background being raised in Florida. All the yankees (meaning Northerners) wanted to come to Florida for their vacations, but they spent the whole time there talking about how primitive the conditions were, how bad the mosquitoes were, how hot it was, how we didn't have all the good stores and shops they had up North, how we didn't have good restaurants or clubs etc. I was even in line at the supermarket one day and heard some New York woman whining on about that to her friend and I just told her "Lady, if you don't like it, the road that brought you here goes back to where you came from. Why don't you hit it?"

So, there I am, trying like crazy to maintain my illusions about France, all the while having experiences that tell me that the French are not what they present themselves to be, and then that whole "French Connection" thing happened. Not once, but twice.

That is what drove me to do some research, which is the next part of the process. Find out what other people have experienced and what they have observed and think and compare to what you have observed and experienced.

I guess you get the picture.

Anyway, I'm presently giving equal time to re-examining life in the U.S. from the point of view of a Lithuanian immigrant, formerly an anti-Communist dissident. He went to the U.S. the same way I went to France: thinking it was the greatest place on Earth. He is pretty bitter, but still, the facts he has dug up about the U.S. are far more damning than anything that has gone on in France. With a few adjustments, France really could be a beacon of liberte egalite and fraternite... the U.S. would have to be destroyed at its foundations to ever be a real democracy.
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
sitting said:
fille des bois said:
thank you for this session .It was really interesting especially that

Q: (Psyche) So the question is, is there something essentially wrong with French culture? [Laughter]

A: Now, yes. Since the revolution was coopted by dark forces.

Q: (Perceval) That could be since Sarko came in... (Ailen) Or farther back.

A: Longer ago than that.

Q: (Ottershrew) Since 1789? (Ailen) The French Revolution.

A: Yes

I'll like to know who are these dark forces ? but may be it'll be too dangerous to talk about them ?

In "The Curse of Canaan" by Eustace Mullins, there's a short but highly informative chapter on the French Revolution.

Douglas Reed's, Controversy of Zion, also has some interesting insights into the French Revolution.
 
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