Session 29 December 2018

Meager1

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
“Recall that 4D is a realm where thought has the power to create. If a mind, and here we mean much more than you understand as mind, thinks about a structure or something that needs to be accomplished, it assembles itself, more or less. Then when the structure is sent back through the realm curtain, the "idea" is the attractor blueprint that draws to itself the matching elements from your reality and they proceed through the process of organic assembly. This occurs because even inanimate matter has a minimal level of matching consciousness.”




Is it just me, or might the above help to explain how the pyramids etc got built without the actual technology existing to build them.
 

Matthew

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
“Recall that 4D is a realm where thought has the power to create. If a mind, and here we mean much more than you understand as mind, thinks about a structure or something that needs to be accomplished, it assembles itself, more or less. Then when the structure is sent back through the realm curtain, the "idea" is the attractor blueprint that draws to itself the matching elements from your reality and they proceed through the process of organic assembly. This occurs because even inanimate matter has a minimal level of matching consciousness.”




Is it just me, or might the above help to explain how the pyramids etc got built without the actual technology existing to build them.

I thought they were built using sound technology. Wasn't that stated by the C's previously? Apologies if I am misremembering.

Funnily enough, the paragraph above in respect of the 4D blueprint then causing a 3D actualisation is not dissimilar to something I just read in a novel ie. 'Xenocide' [the third novel in the Ender's Game series].
 

Ant22

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Please be informed that the whole scaring-a-cat-with-a-cucumber can be traumatic for a cat. I can remember Zoya mentioning it in a Pet Health Segment some time ago, but I couldn't find a forum post.

I realise that The Mechanic and my intention wasn't to suggest it is OK to scare our pets for our own amusement. I simply drew an analogy between what 3D does to 2D and what 4D does to us: as above so below.
 

Learner

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Nienna; Your kind and thoughtful act of posting that particular post of Laura has strengthened me enormously. Thank you. Maybe I have been too hard on myself, but really, I think I may have been pitying myself. Surrounded by a wonderful family, but one that has NO interest in my findings, leaves me very melancholy at times. Upwards and onwards.

I can count myself very lucky regarding my family as well overall, and we do agree on some levels while on others we don't (and it also depends on the respective person). But if you feel completely alone in this, well, that must be awful at times. However, somewhere I read a post by Ennio - don't know where - which said, to paraphrize it, that we can only be best examples for others by putting in action the insights and knowledge we've gained. And others can then decide (especially those living alongside us), when they see that it does us good, if they want to implement some of it into their lives as well.

One example of this would be fixing our diet and detox. This already puts into question a generally consented upon reality, and if this is not denied but openly explored, it opens up chances for questioning other aspects of that kind of generally consented upon reality. But that's up to their own choices in the end.
 

Tuatha de Danaan

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I can count myself very lucky regarding my family as well overall, and we do agree on some levels while on others we don't (and it also depends on the respective person). But if you feel completely alone in this, well, that must be awful at times. However, somewhere I read a post by Ennio - don't know where - which said, to paraphrize it, that we can only be best examples for others by putting in action the insights and knowledge we've gained. And others can then decide (especially those living alongside us), when they see that it does us good, if they want to implement some of it into their lives as well.

One example of this would be fixing our diet and detox. This already puts into question a generally consented upon reality, and if this is not denied but openly explored, it opens up chances for questioning other aspects of that kind of generally consented upon reality. But that's up to their own choices in the end.


Learner, Had a read of your post and promptly went for a little cry upstairs. It was wonderful and released a lot of tension. You are so right . I just have to get with the script and shape myself. Went for a 4 mile walk today as the sun was hidden behind the clouds and that was good. Thank you for that whisper in my ear.
 

Learner

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Learner, Had a read of your post and promptly went for a little cry upstairs. It was wonderful and released a lot of tension. You are so right . I just have to get with the script and shape myself. Went for a 4 mile walk today as the sun was hidden behind the clouds and that was good. Thank you for that whisper in my ear.

You are most welcome! :-) And I am glad, the release and the walk helped you.

Yes, that remembering of ourselves to follow through with our own choices respective the Work is hard enough, especially if we - or aspects of ourselves - are standing in the way and / or if we want to avoid potential conflicts with those around us (at least from my experience). Then, external consideration also comes into play here.

I love going for longer walks too, when I can make it, as it usually also helps me to release tension and clearing the head (and if it is just from stress of sitting too long in front of the laptop; and sometimes due to disagreements or feeling depressed), which can thus give way to new insights and ideas, how to go about on solving problems / obstacles and follow through with choices if this is on the front to do.
 

The Mechanic

Jedi Council Member
I realise that The Mechanic and my intention wasn't to suggest it is OK to scare our pets for our own amusement. I simply drew an analogy between what 3D does to 2D and what 4D does to us: as above so below.
Ah, allright, then I didn't understand you correctly. And, yeah, so true.. lot's off cucumbers for us 3d'ers. Thanks for reminding me :-)
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
And don’t forget that the creators of Islam borrowed heavily from the stories of Abraham and Moses which the Jews invented with models of real historical figures of Greek and Egyptian history back when the OT was written in about 272 BC. All of that is discussed by Gmirkin and Wajdenbaum. (Argonauts of the Desert etc.} The inventors of Islam didn't know that they were creating stories based on already invented stories, etc.
There is a recent interview with Russel Gmirkin in which he has time to put forward his findings about the origin of the Bible and it's borrowings from the templates put forward by Plato. Initially the sound is falling out, but it gets better after some about 15 minutes
The moment I inserted begins a question that is followed by Gmirkin mentioning Plato who gave the template around which later theocracies were built.
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
A: Consider carefully the developmental pathways of the three test cases. First you have Judaism. It began as a widespread cult of comet/storm god worship. It was reformulated to meet the needs of a dispossessed people and encourage solidarity among them.
Summary
In this post, I will try to find traces of "It began as a widespread cult of comet/storm god worship." It became clear that there were a lot of storm gods in the area. It turns out the essence of angels in Judaism often are associated with fire. For short points summing up the names of possible storm/comet associated angels and their characteristics scroll down to the end.

It may take more analysis to argue the second point that "It was reformulated to meet the needs of a dispossessed people and encourage solidarity among them." and I did not try very hard, especially the "reformulated" part. One could perhaps mention the role two-three angels served as explainers, or that the overall content of the Hebrew Bible points in that direction of offering guidance and ensuring cohesion and control of a people, as evident when one reads the Pentateuch.

Looking for weather gods in the ancient world
Under: Weather God there is a lot to choose from. People of the ancient world travelled. They could be traders or officials, but it was at a slow pace. Therefore, those who travelled must have had and some knowledge about languages and customs among the people they met. It is not surprising that many of the gods in the ancient world had similar attributes, even if they went under different names.

Storm gods in the ancient Middle East and the Eastern Mediterranean
Canaanite
  • Ba'al, Canaanite god of fertility, weather, and war.
  • Hadad, the Canaanite and Carthaginian storm, fertility, & war god. Identified as Baʿal's true name at Ugarit.
Egyptian
Hebrew
Mesopotamian
  • Adad, the Assyrian storm god
  • Marduk, Babylonian god of water, vegetation, judgment, and magic.
Greco-Roman
  • Aeolus (son of Hippotes), keeper of the winds in the Odyssey
  • Anemoi, collective name for the gods of the winds in Greek mythology, their number varies from 4 to more
  • Jupiter, the Romanthunder/lightning and sky god and king of the gods
  • Tempestas, Roman goddess of storms or sudden weather. Commonly referred to in the plural, Tempestates.
  • Zeus, Greekthunder/lightning and sky god and king of the gods
Anatolian-Caucasian
They must have had some pretty severe weather occasionally to merit so many names for storm gods. Under Hebrew, the Wiki editor wrote: "Unnamed lesser elohim" Can we get that any closer? It turned out to be a Pandora's box of possibilities. In a specialized Wiki on the subject of Angles in Judaism, one finds, that the essence of an angel is often associated with fire. For more details, a lot of excerpts are needed, at least if one would later like to revisit the topic and would not like to start all over.
In Judaism, angels (Hebrew: מַלְאָךְ‎ mal’akh, plural: מלאכים‎ mal’akhim) are supernatural beings that appear throughout the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), rabbinic literature, apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, and traditional Jewish liturgy as agents of the God of Israel. They are categorized in different hierarchies. Their essence is often associated with fire. The Talmud describes their very essence as fire.[1]
One does wonder what came first, the idea of one god above others, or there being a variety, that were later fitted into the one god covers all. The sm
The morphological structure of the word mal’akh suggests that it is the maqtal form of the root denoting the tool or the means of performing it.[4] The term Mal'akh therefore simply means the one who is sent, often translated as "messenger" when applied to humans; for instance, Mal’akh is the root of the name of the prophet Malachi, whose name means "my messenger". In modern Hebrew, mal’akh is the general word for "angel"; it is also related to the words for "angel" in Arabic (malak ملاك), Aramaic and Ethiopic.
The figure of "the angel of the LORD" (Heb. מלאך יהוה‎; mal’akh YHVH) has been perceived by generations of exegetes and interpreters as obscure and perplexing. Almost every appearance of this figure in the Tanakh complies to the following pattern:
  1. The narration introduces the angel of the LORD;
  2. He behaves as if he were a deity, e.g. promising fertility (Genesis 21:18), annihilating an army with a single blow (e.g. 2 Kings 19:32-36), or merely delivering a speech in which the angel presents himself as God (e.g. Exodus 3:2-4);
  3. The interlocutors of this figure address and revere him in a way reserved exclusively to a deity.
As such, the incident leaves the reader with the question whether it was an angel or a deity who had just appeared.[5]
Under the heading "In the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible)", one finds "Angels as teachers in Jewish apocalyptic literature":
Angels in the roles of teachers become especially important in Jewish apocalyptic literature, in such books as Daniel, Zechariah, and 4 Ezra, which feature enigmatic and terrifying prophetic visions experienced by unknowing humans who need heavenly guidance to understand what they have witnessed; no longer does prophecy come with full or immediate understanding.[12] Rather, a type of commentary or explanation of the vision is provided through the figure of an interpreting angel, whose teachings dispel the ignorance of the prophet and allow him to better understand, and thus better propagate, the knowledge of the end times that his vision contains.[13]

Such knowledge of the apocalypse had both heavenly and earthly implications, and assumed a great deal of importance to the oppressed people of Israel at the time, who needed explanations for why God would let them go through so much hardship; thus, the knowledge was “good.”[14] Because of the bizarre features of the visions contained in such apocalyptic literature, interpreting angels assume the roles of teachers rather than just messengers; instead of just conveying information, they must explain it.[13]

As teachers, they convey the full might and authority of heaven, while being able to comfort their distressed human charges in a more relatable way than if the prophets were directly spoken to by God. Thus, angels as teachers function as relatable interpreters and testaments to God's power, while also increasing His transcendence.[13] Most of all, they were important in establishing human prophets in their proper role as comforters, with “good” knowledge, to the people of Israel.

In
4 Ezra, the interpreting or teaching angel is Uriel. When Ezra expresses his distress about issues that would be similarly preoccupying Jews of his time—namely, why God would allow His chosen people to suffer under the oppression of the Gentiles—Uriel is sent from heaven by God to help relieve his ignorance. [...][13]

In Daniel, angels also assume the roles of interpreters and teachers, notably in their abilities to explain visions concerning the eschaton, and help human prophets unknot knowledge from it. In Daniel, it is the archangel Gabriel who is sent down from heaven by God to explain Daniel's perplexing visions and help relieve some of his distress (Daniel 8:16-17). In Daniel 7-12, the good knowledge that is transmitted to Daniel and thus to the rest of the population, is that the earthly events that have been so oppressing the Jewish people are being mirrored in heaven, and that justice will eventually reign in the form of a final battle pitting the armies of heaven against evil forces, which will be vanquished.[15]
Much more about angels some names and functions
Here are some quotes that move closer to what this realm of angels, the first is from the same article about Angles in Judaism.
In rabbinic literature
As a subcategory of heavenly beings, mal’akim occupy the sixth rank of ten in Maimonides' Jewish angelic hierarchy.

Michael, Gabriel, Uriel, and Raphael

The Talmud names four angels who would later be known as archangels, surrounding God's throne:

As the Holy One blessed be He created four winds (directions) and four banners (for Israel's army), so also did He make four angels to surround His Throne—Michael, Gabriel, Uriel and Raphael. Michael is on its right, corresponding to the tribe of Reuben; Uriel on its left, corresponding to the tribe of Dan, which was located in the north; Gabriel in front, corresponding to the tribe of Judah as well as Moses and Aaron who were in the east; and Raphael in the rear, corresponding to the tribe of Ephraim which was in the west.[16]
The "the sixth rank of ten in Maimonides' Jewish angelic hierarchy." refers to a text of Moses ben Maimon, [note 1] (1138–1204) who "in his Mishneh Torah, counted ten ranks of angels in the Jewish angelic hierarchy, beginning from the highest:[17][18][19][20]" And they are: 1.Chayoth Ha Kadesh[21]; 2. Ophanim 3. Erelim 4. Hashmallim 5. Seraphim 6. Malakim, Messengers, angels 7. Elohim"Godly beings" 8. Bene Elohim" Sons of Godly beings" 9. Cherubim 10. Ishim"manlike beings".
This list is similar as far as the names goes to what is mostly found in the Jewish Kabbalah literature, see Angels in Judaism.

Below are excerpts about all the terms, as far as possible and beginning with
1. Chayoth Ha Kadesh which leads to a Wiki on Living creatures (Bible):
Ezekiel's vision of the four living creatures in Ezekiel chapter 1 are identified as cherubim in chapter 10[1] who are God's throne bearers.[2] Cherubim as minor guardian deities[3] of temple or palace thresholds are known all over the Ancient East. Each of Ezekiel's cherubim have four faces, that of a man, a lion, an ox, and an eagle.[2] However, their human shape appearances set them apart from the griffin-like cherubs and lamassu of Babylonia and Assyria. In their ability to move, Ezekiel's cherubim do not need to turn, since they face all compass points simultaneously.[1] This description of movement differs from the seraphim in Isaiah's vision (Isaiah 6:2) who have an extra set of wings for their ability to fly.[4]

Revelation's four living beings
In Revelation 4:6–8, four living beings (Greek: ζῷον, zōion)[5] are seen in John's vision. These appear as a lion, an ox, a man, and an eagle, much as in Ezekiel but in a different order. They have six wings, whereas Ezekiel's four living creatures are described as only having four.[5] In verse 6, they are said to have "eyes all over, front and back", suggesting that they are alert and knowledgeable, that nothing escapes their notice.[5] The description parallels the wheels that are beside the living creatures in Ezekiel 1.18; 10.12, which are said to be "full of eyes all around". The Hebrew word for "wheel" (ôpannîm) was also used in later Jewish literature to indicate a member of the angelic orders (1 Enoch 71.7; 3 Enoch 1.8; 7.1; 25.5-6, etc.). In this passage in Revelation, the four beasts surround "the one" on the red throne (which is of ruby and sardius), which is contrasted with the white throne in Daniel 7:9 and Revelation 20:11–15.
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Metatron is the archangel in this host. There are various opinions about the meaning of the name. Interesting that a wheel is related to a member of an angelic order.

2. Ophanim:
The ophanim or ofanim (Heb. "wheels" ōphannīm אוֹפַנִּים; singular: ōphān, ofan אוֹפָן), also called galgalim (galgallim "spheres", "wheels", "whirlwinds" גַּלְגַּלִּים; singular: galgal, גַּלְגַּל), refer to the wheels seen in Ezekiel's vision of the chariot (Hebrew merkabah) in Ezekiel 1:15–21. One of the Dead Sea scrolls (4Q405) construes them as angels; late sections of the Book of Enoch (61:10, 71:7) portray them as a class of celestial beings who (along with the Cherubim and Seraphim) never sleep, but guard the throne of God.

These "wheels" have been associated with Daniel 7:9 (mentioned as galgal, traditionally "the wheels of galgallin", in "fiery flame" and "burning fire") of the four, eye-covered wheels (each composed of two nested wheels), that move next to the winged Cherubim, beneath the throne of God. The four wheels move with the Cherubim because the spirit of the Cherubim is in them. The late Second Book of Enoch (20:1, 21:1) also referred to them as the "many-eyed ones".

The First Book of Enoch (71.7) seems to imply that the Ophanim are equated to the "Thrones" in Christianity when it lists them all together, in order: "...round about were Seraphim, Cherubim, and Ophannin".[1]
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Raziel is the archangel in this host. He is the "Keeper of Secrets" and the "Angel of Mysteries".

3. Regarding the Erelim one reads they are associated with death and national destruction, whether associated with natural or man-made upheaval.
Erelim (Hebrew: אֶרְאֶלִּים‎, from erelam, Hebrew: אֶרְאֶלָּ֔ם‎, “valiant ones”), is a class of angel whose existence is derived from a verse in the book of Isaiah[1][2][3][4] regarding the impending invasion of Jerusalem by Sennacherib during the reign of King Hezekiah.[2]

While the erelim are ascribed numerous functions in Jewish and Kabbalistic texts and literature, they most often appear to be associated with moments of death and national tragedy.[3][2] They appear in multiple angelic hierarchies, ranking first among the ten orders of angels in the Berit Menuchah,[5] second in the Zohar,[3][5] third by Maimonides,[3][5][6][7][8] and tenth in the Maseket Azilut.[4]
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Zaphkiel is the archangel of this host. The name means God's knowledge.

4. Hashmallim seem to fit with angels associated with storm and notice that the word "hashmal" has become the modern Hebrew equivalent of electricity.
The Hashmallim (חַשְׁמַלִּים chashmalim; sing. Hashmal, חַשְׁמַל chashmal) are angelic entities in Judaism.[1]

The word hashmal appears in the Hebrew Bible in Ezekiel 1:4:

I saw, and behold, there was a stormy wind coming from the north, a great cloud with flashing fire and a brilliance surrounding it; and from its midst, like the color of the Hashmal [often translated electrum] from the midst of the fire, and in its midst there was the likeness of four Chayot חיות (living creatures).
Hashmallim occupy the fourth rank of ten in Maimonides's exposition of the Jewish angelic hierarchy.

The Septuagint translates "hashmal" to ηλεκτρον (elektron), which means "amber" in English. Francis Bacon coined the English word "electricity" to describe the static electric effect of rubbing amber with cloth. Later, "hashmal" became the modern Hebrew word that translates to the English word "electricity." Jewish poet Judah Leib Gordon coined the modern Hebrew word, in his 1878 collection Gabashta.[2]
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Zadkiel is the archangel of this host. He has the attributes of freedom, benevolence and mercy.

5. Seraphim which with the meaning of "the burning one" fits well with what a blazing comet would do.
A seraph (/ˈsɛrəf/, "the burning one"; /ˈsɛrəfɪm/, in the King James Version also seraphims (plural); Hebrew: שָׂרָף (śārāf [saːraːf]), plural שְׂרָפִים (śərāfîm [səraːfim]); Latin: seraphim, plural seraphin (also seraphus (-i, m.));[1] Greek: σεραφείμ (serapheím); Arabic: مشرفين (musharifin)[2] is a type of celestial or heavenly being originating in Ancient Judaism. The term plays a role in subsequent Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.[3] The singular "seraph" is a back-formation from the Hebrew plural-form 'seraphim', whereas in Hebrew the singular is 'saraph'.[4]

Tradition places seraphim in the highest rank in Christian angelology and in the fifth rank of ten in the Jewish angelic hierarchy. A seminal passage in the Book of Isaiah (Isaiah 6:1–8) used the term to describe six-winged beings that fly around the Throne of God crying "holy, holy, holy". This throne scene, with its triple invocation of holiness, profoundly influenced subsequent theology, literature and art. Its influence is frequently seen in works depicting angels, heaven and apotheosis. Seraphim are mentioned as celestial beings in an influential Hellenistic work, the Book of Enoch, and the Book of Revelation.
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Camael is the archangel of this host. He has the attributes of strength, courage and war.

6. Malakim leads back to Angels in Judaism but the Portuguese Wiki claims that Raphael is the archangel of this host. He is associated with healing. One example of this function can be found in the Book of Tobit.

7. Elohim has:
In the Hebrew Bible, elohim (Hebrew: אֱלֹהִים‎ [(ʔ)eloˈ(h)im]) usually refers to a single deity,[1][2][3][4] particularly (but not always) the God of Israel.[1][2][3][4][5][6] At other times it refers to deities in the plural.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

The word is the plural form of the word eloah[1][2][4][7][8][9] and related to el. It is cognate to the word 'l-h-m which is found in Ugaritic, where it is used as the pantheon for Canaanite gods, the children of El, and conventionally vocalized as "Elohim". Most uses of the term Elohim in the later Hebrew text imply a view that is at least monolatrist at the time of writing, and such usage (in the singular), as a proper title for the supreme deity, is generally not considered to be synonymous with the term elohim, "gods" (plural, simple noun). Rabbinic scholar Maimonides wrote that the various other usages are commonly understood to be homonyms.[10]

The notion of divinity underwent radical changes in the early period of Israelite identity and development of Ancient Hebrew religion. The ambiguity of the term elohim is the result of such changes, cast in terms of "vertical translatability", i.e. the re-interpretation of the gods of the earliest recalled period as the national god of monolatrism as it emerged in the 7th to 6th century BCE in the Kingdom of Judah and during the Babylonian captivity, and further in terms of monotheism by the emergence of Rabbinical Judaism in the 2nd century CE.[11]
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Haniel is the archangel of this host, associated with Venus, joy and pleasure.

8. Bene Elohim leads to Sons of God:
Sons of God (Hebrew: בני האלהים‎, romanized: bənê haĕlōhîm,[1] literally: "sons of the gods"[2]) is a phrase used in the Hebrew Bible and in Christian Apocrypha. The phrase is also used in Kabbalah where bene elohim are part of different Jewish angelic hierarchies.
Which has:
Genesis 6
And it came to pass, when men began to multiply on the face of the earth, and daughters were born unto them, That the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose. And the LORD said, My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years. There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown. 
- Genesis 6:1 KJV.
And further down there are references to Job 1:6, 2:1, 38:7, Deuteronomy 32:8, Psalms 29:1, 82:6, 89:6 and Daniel 3:25. The Portuguese Wiki claims that Michael is the leader of this host. The Wiki on Michael mentions:
Sanctuaries to Michael were built by Christians in the 4th century, when he was first seen as a healing angel. Over time his role became one of a protector and the leader of the army of God against the forces of evil.

9. Cherubim
A cherub (/ˈtʃɛrəb/;[1] plural cherubim; Hebrew: כְּרוּב‎ kərūv, pl. כְּרוּבִים kərūvîm) is one of the unearthly beings who directly attend to God, according to Abrahamic religions. The numerous depictions of cherubim assign to them many different roles, such as protecting the entrance of the Garden of Eden.[2]

In Jewish angelic hierarchy, cherubim have the ninth (second-lowest) rank in Maimonides' Mishneh Torah (12th century), and the third rank in Kabbalistic works such as Berit Menuchah (14th century). De Coelesti Hierarchia places them in the highest rank alongside Seraphim and Thrones.[3]

In the Book of Ezekiel and (at least some) Christian icons, the cherub is depicted as having two pairs of wings, and four faces: that of a lion (representative of all wild animals), an ox (domestic animals), a human (humanity), and an eagle (birds).[4] Their legs were straight, the soles of their feet like the hooves of a bull, gleaming like polished brass. Later tradition ascribes to them a variety of physical appearances.[4]
And further down under Judaism:
In rabbinic literature, the two cherubim are described as being human-like figures with wings, one a boy and the other a girl, placed on the opposite ends of the Mercy seat in the inner-sanctum of God's house.[23] Solomon's Temple was decorated with Cherubs according to 1 Kings 6, and Aḥa bar Ya’akov claimed this was true of the Second Temple as well.[24]
[...]
Maimonides says that the figures of the cherubim were placed in the sanctuary only to preserve among the people the belief in angels, there being two in order that the people might not be led to believe that they were the image of God.[25]
Having read Genesis, I had been wondering about these cherubims, but it is at any rate not easy to connect them to anything about storm or comets, although one also could look at the attributes of the archangel. The Portuguese Wiki claims that Gabriel is the leader of this host. The Wiki about Gabriel mentions that the meaning of the name is 'God is my Strength' and adds: "Alongside archangel Michael, Gabriel is described as the guardian angel of Israel, defending its people against the angels of the other nations.[6]"

10. Ishim
The Ishim or Eshim are a class of angels said to be the closest to the affairs of mortals. The Ishim are also comparable with the Erelim or the Bene Elim/Bene Elohim. [...]

In Judaism, the Ishim (Heb. אִישִׁים - "men", "personages", "personalities", "individuals") or Eshim (אֵשִׁים - "fires", "flames", "sparks", "conflagrations") are a class of angels said to be the closest to the affairs of mortals.[citation needed] They are composed of fire and snow, and are described as the "beautiful souls of just men" who reside in Makon, the 5th Heaven.[citation needed]
The Portuguese Wiki claims that Sandalphon is the leader of this host. The Wiki about him has: "He is said to appear before the feminine presence of the Shekhinah[1] and to receive human prayers and send them to God."

There are other angels, among them Nuriel, Jehuel, Samael and Lailah.

A. Nuriel
Nuriel, an angel in Jewish mythology, translates as "Fire of the Lord" and is the angel responsible for hailstorms.[1]

In Jewish legend, Moses encountered Nuriel in the 2nd heaven,[2] when he issues from the side of Chesed (Mercy), Nuriel manifests in the form of an eagle,[3] an eagle that, when issuing from the side of Geburah (Strength), is Uriel.

According to the Zohar, Nuriel governs Virgo.[4] He is 300 parasangs (approx. 5.6 km) tall and has an army of 50 myriads of angels (= 500,000) "all fashioned out of water and fire."[5] The height of Nuriel is exceeded only by the Erelim, by the watchers, by Af and Hemah, and of course by Metatron, who is the tallest hierarch in heaven. Nuriel is also effective as a charm for warding off evil. His name is found engraved on oriental and Hebrew amulets, notably those worn by pregnant women.[6]

Outside of Judaism, in the Syriac Book of Protection, Nuriel is characterized as a "spellbinding power" and is grouped with Michael, Shamsiel, Seraphiel, and other great angels.[7] In gnostic lore, Nuriel is one of seven subordinates to Jehuel, prince of fire.[4]
B. Jehuel
Yahoel or Jehoel (Hebrew יהואל, also spelled Jehoel in some English texts, and Yaoel in French sources) is the name of an angel appearing in the Old Church Slavonic manuscripts of the Apocalypse of Abraham, a pseudepigraphical work dating from after the Siege of Jerusalem (70).[1] He is an associate of Michael (Apoc.Abr.10:17) charged to restrain Leviathan and destroy idolaters (10:10-14).[2]

Another later pseudepigraphical rabbinical work ascribed to Ishmael ben Elisha, Hebrew 3 Enoch 48d, gives Yahoel as one of the 70 names of Metatron, which makes sense in light of the character and role of Yahoel in the Apocalypse of Abraham.[3]

In the 13th Century kabbalistic Berith Menucha of Abraham Merimon of Granada Yahoel is the angel over fire.
If Jehuel is the angel over fire, then one might think of fire in the sky, but it could also just be a household fire. Charged to restrain Leviathan indicates a recognition of existence. The Wiki has:
Leviathan (/lɪˈvaɪ.əθən/; לִוְיָתָן, Līvəyāṯān) is a mythical creature with the form of a sea serpent in Judaism. It is referenced in several books of the Hebrew Bible, including Psalms, the Book of Job, the Book of Isaiah, and the Book of Amos; it is also mentioned in the apocryphal Book of Enoch.

The Leviathan of the Book of Job is a reflection of the older Canaanite Lotan, a primeval monster defeated by the god Baal Hadad. Parallels to the role of Mesopotamian Tiamat defeated by Marduk have long been drawn in comparative mythology, as have been wider comparisons to dragon and world serpent narratives such as Indra slaying Vrtra or Thor slaying Jörmungandr.[1]
And there is further down:
Later Jewish sources describe Leviathan as a dragon who lives over the sources of the Deep and who, along with the male land-monster Behemoth, will be served up to the righteous at the end of time. The Book of Enoch (60:7–9) describes Leviathan as a female monster dwelling in the watery abyss (as Tiamat), while Behemoth is a male monster living in the desert of Dunaydin ("east of Eden").[10]

When the Jewish midrash (explanations of the Tanakh) were being composed, it was held that God originally produced a male and a female leviathan, but lest in multiplying the species should destroy the world, he slew the female, reserving her flesh for the banquet that will be given to the righteous on the advent of the Messiah.[20][21]
Does this conflict between Jehuel and Leviathan carry a meaning of past global cataclysms? Conflicts between objects in the sky and the sea?

The next one could also be understood to be related to destruction.
C. Samael
Samael (Hebrew: סַמָּאֵל‎, Sammāʾēl, 'Venom of God, Poison of God'[1] or 'Blindness of God'; Arabic: سمسمائيل‎, Samsama'il or سمائل‎, Samail; alternatively Smil, Samil, or Samiel)[2][3][4] is an archangel in Talmudic and post-Talmudic lore; a figure who is the accuser (Ha-Satan), seducer, and destroyer (Mashhit).
Interestingly one also finds:
He is considered in Talmudic texts to be a member of the heavenly host with often grim and destructive duties. One of Samael's greatest roles in Jewish lore is that of the main angel of death and the head of satans. Although he condones the sins of man, he remains one of God's servants. He appears frequently in the story of Garden of Eden and engineered the fall of Adam and Eve with a snake in writings during the Second Temple period.[5] However, the serpent is not a form of Samael, but a beast he rode like a camel.[8] In a single account he is also believed to be the father of Cain,[6][9] as well as the partner of Lilith.

As guardian angel and prince of Rome, he is the archenemy of Israel. By the beginning of Jewish culture in Europe, Samael had been established as a representative of Christianity, due to his identification with Rome.[10][7]:263
Samael is related to Azazel a goat demon.

The very last one is different and more for the sake of curiosity and to show that angels associated with Judaism, at least in some interpretations, can take many forms:

D. Lailah:
The name Lailah is the same as the Hebrew word for "night" laylah לילה. The identification of the word "night" as the name of an angel originates with the interpretation of "Rabbi Yochanan" (possibly Yochanan ben Zakkai c. 30 - 90 CE) who read "At night [Abraham] and his servants deployed against them and defeated them” (JPS Genesis 14.14) as "by [an angel called] night" (Sanhedrin 96a).

The noun for "night" in the Semitic languages is derived from the tri-consonantal root: L-Y-L, also found in Arabic laylah "night" (Arabic: ليلى‎). The root is also shared with the Hebrew noun liliyt, "night creature", one origin of the Lilith myth.[1]

The ending lah is a feminine. Lailah is the only angel with a feminine name and distinctly feminine characteristics.[2]
Being only an angel, Lailah is not on the Wiki list of night deities, and one would then remind oneself that the storm angels are not storm gods.


Summary of the search results inspired by "It began as a widespread cult of comet/storm god worship"
Storm gods were common among the people in the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean in which the early Jews lived. The description of several angels indicate a relation with storm, fire and destruction. Here are some candidates:
2. Ophanim: "spheres", "wheels", "whirlwinds"[..] These "wheels" have been associated with Daniel 7:9 (mentioned as galgal, traditionally "the wheels of galgallin", in "fiery flame" and "burning fire")"
3. Erelim: "are ascribed numerous functions in Jewish and Kabbalistic texts and literature, they most often appear to be associated with moments of death and national tragedy.[3][2]"
4. Hashmallim: "a stormy wind coming from the north, a great cloud with flashing fire and a brilliance surrounding it; and from its midst, like the color of the Hashmal [often translated electrum] from the midst of the fire, and in its midst there was the likeness of four Chayot חיות (living creatures)."
5. Seraphim: A seraph (/ˈsɛrəf/, "the burning one";
10. Ishim: "fires", "flames", "sparks", "conflagrations"
A. Nuriel: "Nuriel, an angel in Jewish mythology, translates as "Fire of the Lord" and is the angel responsible for hailstorms.[1]"
B. Jahuel: "Yahoel is the angel over fire."
C. Samael: - destroyer

One could always do more work on these topics, but for now, I feel confident to say about Judaism that: "It began as a widespread cult of comet/storm god worship. It was reformulated to meet the needs of a dispossessed people and encourage solidarity among them." In fact, the huge number of storm gods and fire/sky gods in the larger geographical area indicate that it was only a part of the descendants of all the storm/comet god worshippers that having become dispossessed later responded to the reformulated storm/comet god movement. In many ways, it is not so different from what happens today, where people also respond differently to the various religious, economic and political pressures and opportunities.
 

Yupo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I realise that The Mechanic and my intention wasn't to suggest it is OK to scare our pets for our own amusement. I simply drew an analogy between what 3D does to 2D and what 4D does to us: as above so below.
I saw this, human silliness voiceover I know, but it got me imagining this sort of thing going on at all kinds of levels. Who knows what manner of evil might lurk beneath little quills? Warning: Primates use peppery expressions when scared.
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
(Joe) Putin ate my lunch! Is the promotion in Western society of a hostile attitude towards traditional masculine qualities part of a broader nefarious plan?

A: Yes

Q: (Joe) Is part of that to try and make a generation of weak men?

A: Yes

Q: (Joe) Is that with a view to some kind of post 4D transition scenario or something like that, or is it more of a takeover on 3D?

A: More a reflection of desired relationship between 4D STS and humanity.

Q: (L) So in other words, they want to get into doing anal probes. [laughter]

A: Not far off! Dominance over the normal male.
"Not far off! "
And these days we have to undergo Covid tests again and again. After having two Covid antigen nasal probings, I came to think of the above exchange. Added to the honour of being drilled, we had to be in line. In one day it amounted to two and a half-hour of waiting, half the time standing with a nice backpack on the shoulders. And then I really could not complain, what about mothers with babies and children, pregnant women etc. As an old man I spoke to noted, it is a new form of torture. Next time, I need to get a cotton stick inserted in my nasal cavity, I will apply coconut oil in the nostrils just before, to make sure the swabs can turn really nice.
 
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