Session 30 August 2014

kinyash

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Just completed 1 month of cold showers in the morning :halo: So far I spend about 7- 10 minutes and increasing slowly. Haven't gotten round to measuring the water temp, but its COLD enough for now. I'll get round to doing that soon. A week or so ago, I had to get up at 5am to catch a local flight. It was for me , a natural enemy of cold ( I'd sooner be seen in hell than Iceland!) the only way I could get into the (cold) shower was to do a rendition of James Brown's "Sex Machine". Any spiritual benefits of a cold shower was immediately lost by my intuitive choice of tune :P, but I lasted the course.
 

jsf

Jedi Master
Postexercise Muscle Cooling Enhances Gene Expression of PGC-1alpha (a percursor of mitochondrial biogenesis)

see : _http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9Egcu_kswBo/VCfLmnGvtSI/AAAAAAAAAN0/opMCVsOwSzM/s1600/CWI%2BPGC1a.png
 

Puma1974

Jedi
Laura said:
Session Date: August 30th 2014


Q: (Alada) We have some questions on Ebola. In a previous session, it was mentioned that Ebola was a plan. If that's the case, was there a specific genetic group that was a target of this plan?

A: It was not said that Ebola per se was planned, but rather that plans for decimation of population via pathogens was. Ebola happened to present an opportunity.

Q: (Chu) Yeah, that's when they talked about Frankenstein.

A: It can always be worse!

Q: (Mr. Scott) Well, that's comforting.

[...]

(L) Just think of V for Vendetta. In the movie, they created the disease, used it to terrify people, and then they got wealthy on providing the cure, were able to impose a totalitarian regime, over the world, ... It's almost word for word the same scenario. Look at all those pharmaceutical companies... And I bet they'll come out with diets where the people will be encouraged to eat more grains and sugar and take their pills.

(Andromeda) They can be quarantined.

(L) Look at all the gadgets they're going to have to buy. Look at all the supplies they'll have to lay in to survive this. It's a bonanza!

[..]

END OF SESSION

Well this is happening in front of our eyes

How is it possible that this happen ?


A Dallas hospital gave a man antibiotics and sent him home – only for him to be admitted two days later, it has been reported. Federal health officials later confirmed he has the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the US. The unidentified patient has been in isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital since Sunday, officials said. Dallas patient diagnosed with Ebola was initially dismissed with prescription for antibiotics,’ CBS DFW tweeted. The man recently traveled from Liberia to Dallas. Dr. Edward Goodman told Dallas News ‘it does not appear the man went to any other hospitals in the area,’ website said. Scott Gordon, a reporter for KXAS, tweeted ‘Hospital reviewing why patient wasn’t properly diagnosed on Friday when he was evaluated and sent home. Dismissed with antibiotics.’


http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2014/10/01/dallas-ebola-patient-originally-sent-home-with-antibiotics-misdiagnosis-exposed-countless-others-to-virus/

Health fiasco: Ebola patient was vomiting in ambulance, five children exposed from 4 different schools, took at least 3 flights

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/health-fiasco-ebola-patient-was-vomiting-in-ambulance-five-children-exposed-from-4-different-schools-took-at-least-3-flights/

How Bad Could It Get? US Government Order Of 160,000 HazMat Suits Gives A Clue

Now that Ebola is officially in the US on an uncontrolled basis, the two questions on everyone's lips are i) who will get sick next and ii) how bad could it get?

We don't know the answer to question #1 just yet, but when it comes to the second one, a press release three weeks ago from Lakeland Industries, a manufacturer and seller of a "comprehensive line of safety garments and accessories for the industrial protective clothing market" may provide some insight into just how bad the US State Department thinks it may get. Because when the US government buys 160,000 hazmat suits specifically designed against Ebola, just ahead of the worst Ebola epidemic in history making US landfall, one wonders: what do they know the we don't?

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-10-01/how-bad-could-it-get-us-government-order-160000-hazmat-suits-gives-clue
 

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I continue to take cold showers. Now in the morning the water is cold, really. :) To think that others are doing the same, taking cold showers helps. Since then I feel with more energy,not just physical energy but mental one. Never in my life I would have thought taking cold showers, I was one of taking very, extremely hot showers. This change is a big change in my life, like the diet. This mental energy gives me new ideas on many things, it clarifies my brain. How strange! I am more happy, also.

Learning with friends like all of you is fantastic.
 

Anthony

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Leonel said:
Laura said:
Session Date: August 30th 2014


Q: (Alada) We have some questions on Ebola. In a previous session, it was mentioned that Ebola was a plan. If that's the case, was there a specific genetic group that was a target of this plan?

A: It was not said that Ebola per se was planned, but rather that plans for decimation of population via pathogens was. Ebola happened to present an opportunity.

Q: (Chu) Yeah, that's when they talked about Frankenstein.

A: It can always be worse!

Q: (Mr. Scott) Well, that's comforting.

[...]

(L) Just think of V for Vendetta. In the movie, they created the disease, used it to terrify people, and then they got wealthy on providing the cure, were able to impose a totalitarian regime, over the world, ... It's almost word for word the same scenario. Look at all those pharmaceutical companies... And I bet they'll come out with diets where the people will be encouraged to eat more grains and sugar and take their pills.

(Andromeda) They can be quarantined.

(L) Look at all the gadgets they're going to have to buy. Look at all the supplies they'll have to lay in to survive this. It's a bonanza!

[..]

END OF SESSION

Well this is happening in front of our eyes

How is it possible that this happen ?


A Dallas hospital gave a man antibiotics and sent him home – only for him to be admitted two days later, it has been reported. Federal health officials later confirmed he has the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the US. The unidentified patient has been in isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital since Sunday, officials said. Dallas patient diagnosed with Ebola was initially dismissed with prescription for antibiotics,’ CBS DFW tweeted. The man recently traveled from Liberia to Dallas. Dr. Edward Goodman told Dallas News ‘it does not appear the man went to any other hospitals in the area,’ website said. Scott Gordon, a reporter for KXAS, tweeted ‘Hospital reviewing why patient wasn’t properly diagnosed on Friday when he was evaluated and sent home. Dismissed with antibiotics.’


http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2014/10/01/dallas-ebola-patient-originally-sent-home-with-antibiotics-misdiagnosis-exposed-countless-others-to-virus/

Health fiasco: Ebola patient was vomiting in ambulance, five children exposed from 4 different schools, took at least 3 flights

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/health-fiasco-ebola-patient-was-vomiting-in-ambulance-five-children-exposed-from-4-different-schools-took-at-least-3-flights/

How Bad Could It Get? US Government Order Of 160,000 HazMat Suits Gives A Clue

Now that Ebola is officially in the US on an uncontrolled basis, the two questions on everyone's lips are i) who will get sick next and ii) how bad could it get?

We don't know the answer to question #1 just yet, but when it comes to the second one, a press release three weeks ago from Lakeland Industries, a manufacturer and seller of a "comprehensive line of safety garments and accessories for the industrial protective clothing market" may provide some insight into just how bad the US State Department thinks it may get. Because when the US government buys 160,000 hazmat suits specifically designed against Ebola, just ahead of the worst Ebola epidemic in history making US landfall, one wonders: what do they know the we don't?

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-10-01/how-bad-could-it-get-us-government-order-160000-hazmat-suits-gives-clue

This article is also interesting. Don't know how truthful it is, since it's based on a tweet.

Ebola in the US: “Disaster Teams Were Notified Months Ago They Would Be Activated in October”

_http://www.globalresearch.ca/ebola-in-the-us-disaster-teams-were-notified-months-ago-they-would-be-activated-in-october/5405789?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ebola-in-the-us-disaster-teams-were-notified-months-ago-they-would-be-activated-in-october

A public tweet from a large government supplier of emergency response
products specializing in “high risk events” says that Disaster Assistance
Response Teams were told to prepare to be activated in the month of October.
 
N

no-mans-land

Guest
I just finished my first week doing cold showers. 15 minutes with 16 degrees Celsius, though I still cant jump under the shower head right away but have to cool down my feet, legs and arms first, then the head and finally the rest.

At the beginning it's a stare down contest between me and the shower head, this cruel thing who is going to spew icy spears of pain^^. Its really interesting to experience how long 15 minutes can be. Somewhere I read that after the first week things will change and one will begin to enjoy it, but I guess this was a cunning lie to trick people into it because it hurts the same way since day one, no sign of enjoyment whatsoever.

It is quite effective to wake me up and a real motivation booster too. I am sure, the cold showers helped me to finally get up and do a major cleanup of my flat and tomorrow I will be done with it.

It also let me sleep better and it's also a dream booster (more vivid than ever).

Well, but the real challenge will start on Monday when I have to get up for work again and the cold shower will be in the early morning, without the chance to delay it until I feel ready for it. Will be there enough willpower to do it? I hope so.

I wonder what will happen when winter is here and the tap water become even colder. Yeah, cold adaption is a challenge for sure.
 

Puma1974

Jedi
Anthony said:

This article is also interesting. Don't know how truthful it is, since it's based on a tweet.

Ebola in the US: “Disaster Teams Were Notified Months Ago They Would Be Activated in October”

_http://www.globalresearch.ca/ebola-in-the-us-disaster-teams-were-notified-months-ago-they-would-be-activated-in-october/5405789?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ebola-in-the-us-disaster-teams-were-notified-months-ago-they-would-be-activated-in-october

A public tweet from a large government supplier of emergency response
products specializing in “high risk events” says that Disaster Assistance
Response Teams were told to prepare to be activated in the month of October.

March 24 2013 :scared:

A vial containing a potentially harmful virus has gone missing from a laboratory at the University of TEXAS Medical Branch, officials said.

The missing vial, which contains less than a quarter of a teaspoon an infectious disease, had been stored in a locked freezer, designed to handle biological material safely, within the Galveston National Laboratory on UTMB’s campus, officials said. During a routine internal inspection last week, UTMB officials realized one vial of a virus called Guanarito was not accounted for at the facility.

[....] the Guanarito virus is a member of the Arenaviridae group of hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) referred to as the New World arenaviruses. :scared:

Some HFVs are considered to be a significant threat for use as biological weapons due to their potential for causing widespread illness and death. Because of their infectious properties, associated high rates of morbidity and mortality, and ease of person-to-person spread, Ebola, Marburg, Junin, Rift Valley fever, and yellow fever viruses have been deemed to pose a particularly serious threat, and in 1999 the HFVs were classified as category A bioweapons agents by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

:scared:


_http://www.infowars.com/virus-goes-missing-at-utmb-lab/
_http://www.galvestondailynews.com/news/local_news/article_dc2daea8-9435-11e2-80fe-0019bb30f31a.html


Mod's note: Links have been deactivated.
 

Puma1974

Jedi
who stole it? A one year later...

The current outbreak reported in Guinea on March 2014 that is also affecting Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria and Senegal has become the most severe and deadly outbreak so far taking into account its cumulative number of cases and deaths (as of September 21th 2014 the World Health Organization WHO has reported 6,263 cumulative cases including 2,917 deaths for a case fatality rate of 47%) and it involves five countries (three of them sharing borders) in West Africa.

http://healthintelligence.drupalgardens.com/content/chronology-ebola-virus-disease-outbreaks-1976-2014


Laura said:
Session Date: August 30th 2014

Q: (Chu) Yeah, that's when they talked about Frankenstein.

A: It can always be worse!

Q: (Mr. Scott) Well, that's comforting.

(Alada) There was also the comment in a previous session that they may have a Frankenstein on their hands. Does that imply that it's out of control now, and it can potentially kill its creator?

A: Yes, more or less. They are not as smart as they think they are, and there are always hidden factors unaccounted for.
 

Mariama

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
And then there is this WRT Ebola:

Here's one of the scholarly articles published from that research just this past July in the CDC's journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

In it, the researchers conclude, "PRNT is the laboratory standard for immunologic assays... In the ebolavirus PRNTs, we did not include the newest discovered ebolavirus, Bundibugyo virus, which cross-reacts with EBOV [Ebola virus] in immunoassays. Ebolavirus infections in Sierra Leone might be the result of Bundibugyo virus or an ebolavirus genetic variant and not EBOV."

By the way, there are five types of Ebola virus and the newest strain is named Bundibugyo, or Ebobun for short. The U.S. government actually holds a patent on this strain - US 20120251502 A1 , for "Human Ebola Virus Species and Compositions and Methods Thereof" related to the Bundibugyo version of the virus.

Jon Rappoport was one of the few alternative journalists who actually reported on this:

"The research program, occurring in Sierra Leone, the Republic of Guinea, and Liberia - said to be the epicenter of the 2014 Ebola outbreak - has the announced purpose, among others, of detecting the future use of fever-viruses as bioweapons. Is this purely defensive research? Or as we have seen in the past, is this research being covertly used to develop offensive bioweapons"

and

"Why do we have reports that the government of Sierra Leone has recently told Tulane researchers to stop this testing"

http://www.sott.net/article/286807-Handling-of-the-Ebola-crisis-is-like-a-bad-horror-movie
 

Gawan

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
no-man's-land said:
At the beginning it's a stare down contest between me and the shower head, this cruel thing who is going to spew icy spears of pain^^. Its really interesting to experience how long 15 minutes can be. Somewhere I read that after the first week things will change and one will begin to enjoy it, but I guess this was a cunning lie to trick people into it because it hurts the same way since day one, no sign of enjoyment whatsoever.

Maybe it is not the process itself, but only the benefit how you feel afterwards :).

I took my first cold bath today for about 12-14 minutes. I though there are much worse things, but it was not too bad. What was interesting to breath normal when bringing the entire body under the water, because the reaction was to jump out of the water or to breath very fast. The main negative side effect were severe dizziness after getting up, a headache and purple nail beds of fingers and feet.
 

drazen

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I'm currently on my 6th day of cold showers, 15 degrees Celsius for about 15 minutes. Last three days were actually enjoyable while doing it. I usually start with my feet, legs, and slowly making progress upward, giving each part of the body its time to adapt, and after that I'm just circulating over my body with the shower head. There is no such unpleasantness as was in the first few days, which brings smile to my face during and after taking a shower.

Only the top of my head is a bit problematic because it starts to hurt if I'm exposing it for too long to the cold water stream, so I'm just exposing it for about 15 seconds period and quickly redirecting the water stream onto my body, also for some 15 seconds, and again onto my head, doing so about 5 times and then the shivering starts and I'm ready to turn the water off. After, I shiver for an hour or less, almost unable to roll my cigarettes with my hands. :D

Looking forward to experience a few degrees lower temperature of the water in the winter. :)
 

manitoban

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I've been doing the cold baths for about a month now. I started off with about 2 minutes at 18c, and gradually worked my way towards longer times and colder temperatures. I'm now doing 10 minutes at 13/14c and finding it quite bearable. This is amazing to me because I've always been a person who gets cold very easily and really, really didn't like it!

I've noticed also that my tolerance for cold exposure is much higher, and my hands and feet are warm now, whereas before they were usually cold. Another nice side effect is that it has really improved my skin - much less dry and smoother. The best thing about it though, is that it seems to be a real mood booster - I'm noticing a real lift after each cold session.

All in all, I've been very impressed with all the benefits of cold bathing, and especially how fast the body seems to adapt.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
One thing that helps me when I hit maximum cold in the shower, is to do a little "running" on the spot where I stand. It helps to distract the mind until the coldness doesn't bother anymore. At least that's my experience.
 

Flow

Padawan Learner
Thanks for sharing your experience, Aragorn. I've followed your advice and did a little running on the spot and moving, and it is very helpful!
 

lainey

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Aragorn said:
One thing that helps me when I hit maximum cold in the shower, is to do a little "running" on the spot where I stand. It helps to distract the mind until the coldness doesn't bother anymore. At least that's my experience.
I find this running on the spot is involuntary in my case. :lol: Once the water gets icy cold I just start dancing and kicking about like a mad thing. My right side tends to go more than my left. I find my right arm tends to flap about even for a while after I have turned off the shower. I just let it do its thing until it stops by itself. I can't help but think there is a connection to trauma being trapped in the body like in Peter Levine's book; in an unspoken voice. So allowing the body to run through these little spasmodic movements is somehow helpful in releasing something stuck inside? I don't know, just a thought.
 
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