The Ice Age Cometh! Forget Global Warming!

JEEP

The Living Force
Assuming she even makes it across the Atlantic. This is not a good time of year to sail that route, and the weather is already nuts out there.
Maybe these guys can help her out:
Flying Around the World in a Solar Powered Plane

The journey took a very long time—505 days to fly 26,000 miles (42,000 km) at an average speed of about 45 mph (70 kph)—but pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg successfully landed the Solar Impulse 2 aircraft in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday, after flying around the world using only the power of the Sun. Solar Impulse 2 is a solar-powered aircraft equipped with more than 17,000 solar cells that weighs only 2.4 tons with a wingspan of 235 ft (72 m). Technical challenges, poor flying conditions, and a delicate aircraft all contributed to the slow pace. Gathered here are images from the record-setting circumnavigation, undertaken to help focus the world’s efforts to develop renewable energy sources.

Somebody supplied that yacht - why not a solar plane? And it's not like she's going to miss any school!
 

JEEP

The Living Force
the weather is already nuts out there.
Maybe not the best time of year for a solar plane ride over the Atlantic. How about under it? Nuclear submarines are carbon free (if you don't count what's being exhaled/eliminated by the human operators)!

From wiki:
A nuclear submarine is a submarine powered by a nuclear reactor. The performance advantages of nuclear submarines over "conventional" (typically diesel-electric) submarines are considerable. Nuclear propulsion, being completely independent of air, frees the submarine from the need to surface frequently, as is necessary for conventional submarines. The large amount of power generated by a nuclear reactor allows nuclear submarines to operate at high speed for long periods of time; and the long interval between refuelings grants a range virtually unlimited, making the only limits on voyage times being imposed by such factors as the need to restock food or other consumables.

Current generations of nuclear submarines never need to be refueled throughout their 25-year lifespans.[1] Conversely, the limited power stored in electric batteries means that even the most advanced conventional submarine can only remain submerged for a few days at slow speed, and only a few hours at top speed, though recent advances in air-independent propulsion have somewhat ameliorated this disadvantage. The high cost of nuclear technology means that relatively few states have fielded nuclear submarines. Some of the most serious nuclear and radiation accidents ever to occur have involved Soviet nuclear submarine mishaps.[2][3]
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Assuming she even makes it across the Atlantic. This is not a good time of year to sail that route, and the weather is already nuts out there.
As we can see in the tweet below, it was rough on Wednesday. If nothing else, she gets some life experience in a hurry, if that will help? Following the other accounts in the above tweet, a youtube channel turned up:
Sailing La Vagabonde. And a website: Sailing La Vagabonde | A Few Words Behind The Movies where there was a current map of the weather in the region they sail:
1573885437816.png
And their background:
We’re Riley and Elayna, an Australian couple documenting our journey traveling the world by sail despite no previous sailing experience. We’ve been filming it all on YouTube since 2014. We’ve crossed the Mediterranean, Atlantic, Caribbean, and Pacific, and are now raising our boy Lenny on our boat as well.

We’ve suffered terrifying storms, pirate scares, financial breakdowns, equipment failures, water shortages, and other interesting mishaps but we wouldn’t trade living on the Sea and going where the wind takes us for anything.
Greta is not the youngest, it looks like they have a baby on board. Apart from Greta, is it time to learn something about sailing, signs and times considered? In this thread we are maybe talking about ice breakers.
 
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thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Yep, the data for this time a year (for a 50 footer), is dangerous at best. As the open seas takes no prisoners.
The forecast isn't too bad and these people who sail the boat have experience, though not that many small boats cross this time of the year.
I looked at some web sites that informs about the weather at sea:
Wheather online
Ventusky What I like about this map is also that it shows very well where there is cold at the moment. The contrasts between warm and cold air can be dramatic.
On MarineTraffic: Global Ship Tracking Intelligence | AIS Marine Traffic there are quite a few ships in the Atlantic.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The forecast isn't too bad and these people who sail the boat have experience
Things are about to change in the coming days.

Storm-storm deterioration next week: the point this Sunday

The cold drop persists in France, tending to gradually diminish. The fresh air persists in a rather soft context. This explains the morning frosts that we know in the déventés sectors. The degradation is reduced as expected this morning and tomorrow on the Roussillon with low rainfall. The change of weather is confirmed for the next week with a risk of degradation quite intense. Explanations.

As the depression fades slowly, a vast low-pressure system will slide from the Atlantic to France (see animation below). The transition will be short-lived before the introduction of a flow of South a little softer but especially more humid.


Wednesday will be the transition day. After a still cool morning, the maritime entries will multiply to cover a part of the region. The first rains are expected in the evening and in the night from Wednesday to Thursday.

At the moment, we favor the Languedoc and especially the Cevennes which will be in line of sight of these rains. As explained yesterday, it seems that we were heading for a Cevennes episode.

The situation could remain blocked for several days. Indeed, the episode that should begin between Wednesday and Thursday may persist until Saturday. Thursday and especially Friday will be the most watered days with many rainfall especially between Herault, Gard and the Cevennes. In view of a strong sea wind, the rains may be more heterogeneous on the plains to go hang on the reliefs where they will be abundant.


The models begin to agree (despite normal divergences at this time) on a lasting Cevennes episode between Thursday and Saturday. The Roussillon could also have rain but without consequences. Uncertainties still lie in the precise timing but also in the ability of thunderstorms to develop. Indeed, the instability will not, a priori, be very high. The risk of violent storms is not considered. However, the convective character of the rains will have an important role on the rainfall intensities.

The most plausible scenario reports moderate to punctually strong rainfall over the Cevennes reliefs. On the plains, rainy passages are expected but they can be interspersed with lulls. The first accumulations are 200 to 300 mm on the Cevennes spread over several days, 50 to 100 mm in the interior plains of the Hérault and Gard, rather 30 to 70 mm in approaching the littorals.

This first forecast will certainly be refined regularly in view of the uncertainties mentioned above.

Meanwhile:
 

Pashalis

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Anyone crossing the Atlantic within such a nutshell, especially at this time of the year, is simply foolish and asking for trouble. The great ocean is certainly not something to take lightly in any shape, form or fashion. I think there is a lot to the notion, that if you don't approach natural phenomena like the oceans with the due respect and caution they deserve, you ask for big trouble. Heck, I've already a lot of respect and awe when confronted with relatively small waves at the beach. The ocean is breathtakingly awesome but at the same time breathtakingly dangerous and formidable. Greta and company don't strike me as the most aware and caring people in that respect.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Well I say, (IMHO), it's all about the darkness of the lie, that chase the perpetrators!
The reaction from the Universe seems to manifest accordingly and wounder if the approach of the Wave accents it some.
 

JEEP

The Living Force
Scientists Are Predicting Polar Vortex To Bring Big Freeze And Coldest Winter For Five Years : ( ”People Should Be Prepared For a Real Flagstaff Winter” )

The polar vortex is headed toward the US, expected to bring record-breaking cold to the Northeast, upper Midwest, and Great Lakes by this week. It’s so cold that it could give people frostbite in just 5 minutes.

Each year, a pocket of frigid air — the polar vortex — forms over the Arctic, and it usually stays north of the US. But some of it has broken off and is traveling south where it will hit the hardest in Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan, causing temperatures to plummet by as much as 40 degrees Fahrenheit below normal.

The National Weather Service tweeted that windchill will be the coldest since the mid-1990s for some regions.

Some regions are already starting to see record-breaking cold. International Falls, Minnesota hit -46 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, its fifth-lowest temperature on record. And the weather service in Des Moines, Iowa stated: “This is the coldest air many of us will have ever experienced.”

The worst of the storm is expected to hit from Tuesday through Thursday and is forecast to dwindle by Friday. So bundle up because “brutal cold is coming.”
[...]
Health officials have issued a desperate plea to the public, urging them to wrap up warm and turn to pharmacies at the first sign of illness, amid “enormous pressure” on casualty departments. Forecasts suggest could be facing the coldest winter for five years, with average minimum temperatures.

Research has also shown that people with conditions such as heart disease, lung problems including asthma, and dementia are much more likely to die in winter.

Central Ohio local forecast temps range from highest, Thurs. Nov. 21 > 55/43 to lowest, Mon. Dec. 2 > 37/27
Daytime temps in the low to upper 40s on 11 of the next 15 days with 2 days in 50s. Gets into 30s starting on 12/2.
 

Oxajil

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Things are about to change in the coming days. [...] The cold drop persists in France, tending to gradually diminish.
The Netherlands experienced its coldest Oct 6th this year since measurements began (9.6 degrees Celsius as opposed to 10.1 from 1961), and it's getting colder.

The polar vortex is headed toward the US, expected to bring record-breaking cold to the Northeast, upper Midwest, and Great Lakes by this week. It’s so cold that it could give people frostbite in just 5 minutes.
Ouch! I hope people keep warm/wear layers!
 

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
When text becomes reality, it's a good day.

4:25 AM · Nov 22, 2019
During the late 1700s, the ground froze to a depth of 2 feet according to John Adams. When John Adams set out to travel to Philadelphia, it was bitterly cold and there was a foot or more of snow that covered the landscape that had blanketed Massachusetts from one end of the province to the other. Beneath the snow, after weeks of severe cold, the ground was frozen solid to a depth of two feet. Packed ice in the road made the journey very hazardous.




 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Assuming she even makes it across the Atlantic. This is not a good time of year to sail that route, and the weather is already nuts out there.
Anyone crossing the Atlantic within such a nutshell, especially at this time of the year, is simply foolish and asking for trouble. The great ocean is certainly not something to take lightly in any shape, form or fashion. I think there is a lot to the notion, that if you don't approach natural phenomena like the oceans with the due respect and caution they deserve, you ask for big trouble. Heck, I've already a lot of respect and awe when confronted with relatively small waves at the beach. The ocean is breathtakingly awesome but at the same time breathtakingly dangerous and formidable. Greta and company don't strike me as the most aware and caring people in that respect.
I decided to follow the boat across to see what would happen. Now that they are pretty close to Portugal it is time to write. Leaving Greta and the climate politics aside, I found the boat crew made skillful use of various pressure systems and dodged a storm passing in front of them while capitalizing on the good winds following it. Sailing today is very different from sailing before advanced weather forecasting and satellite updates were available. Sure, they have seen quite strong winds like 30 knots average, especially in the beginning, and average wave heights up to about 4 meters, but generally both have been lower. The boat they have looks like a catamaran type which should give more stability considering:
The Wiki has:
Catamarans typically have less hull volume, smaller displacement, and shallower draft (draught) than monohulls of comparable length. The two hulls combined also often have a smaller hydrodynamic resistance than comparable monohulls, requiring less propulsive power from either sails or motors. The catamaran's wider stance on the water can reduce both heeling and wave-induced motion, as compared with a monohull, and can give reduced wakes.
From Sailing La Vagabonde | A Few Words Behind The Movies this is the present position:
1575208866832.png
As a side note, at the max of my interest in sailing, I noticed different advertisements coming in. I realized I had joined the armchair sailors, which before I didn't even know existed, that I possibly was the owner of a nice boat and possibly would be interested in applying for a job as a political analyst for the government. Not bad at all, and I learned so much about sailing that I wondered if there was a thread on the forum about this topic, but didn't find anything yet. I'm not yet convinced it is a subject worth the time, but I ought to say that while I have much respect for the sea, and while I actually have lived close to salty water for many years of my life, and consciously have avoided small boats and sailing, I now know, the risks should be approached like all others.
 
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