AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES CAUSED BY AN INFECTION?

zak

Jedi Council Member
Hesper said:
Laura said:
So, are we all supposed to start eating lots of mushrooms?

Hopefully, some of ya'll can read these things and condense the salient points and we can collect together suggestions for various situations/conditions.
Or maybe supplement with mushroom broths? Hard to say that it could be anywhere near as effective as what you're doing, but could still be useful. Here's some info from Mercola:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/12/31/organic-mushrooms-for-immune-support.aspx

Hanging with Fungi Increases Your Odds of Survival

We're more closely related to fungi than we are to any other kingdom. We share the same pathogens, meaning bacteria and viruses. As a defense against bacterial invasion, fungi have developed strong antibiotics, which also happen to be effective for us humans. Penicillin, streptomycin, and tetracycline all come from fungal extracts.

The predominant mushrooms displaying antiviral activities are the polypores, sometimes called bracket fungi or woody conks, tough and fibrous fungi characterized by many tiny holes on the underside of their caps. Polypores have been dubbed the "frontier" of new medicines and are thought to be the ancestors to most of the gilled mushrooms. Interestingly, there are no known poisonous polypores, whereas there are more than one hundred poisonous gilled mushrooms.

Paul Stamets recently discovered that a very rare polypore called Agaricon is effective against the poxviruses—including smallpox. This has the Department of Defense very interested, as smallpox is one of the most feared bioterrorism agents. Agaricon was also found to be effective against flu viruses.

History tells us that living in cooperation with fungi will increase our odds of survival. After major extinction events, it was the fungi that thrived because they didn't need light and lived on dead organic matter. Organisms pairing with fungi flourished, and those that didn't fared poorly.

Many of the mushrooms valued for strong medicinal properties grow on trees, as opposed to the ground dwellers you've likely seen.

These tree fungi concentrate the unique elements that the host tree has absorbed over its lifetime, which may be ten or twenty or even HUNDREDS of years. Many of these mushroom species are long-term residents of Old Growth Forests and play an essential role in nutrient recycling by decomposing old trees. The mushroom wraps itself around these special nutrients, capturing them in the fruiting body of the organism and turning it into a little medicinal powerhouse. Maybe it's time for us to embrace the mushroom and harness it's medicine the way the Asians have done for thousands of years.

Blends of Mushrooms are More Effective Than any One Mushroom Alone

It is therapeutically best to utilize a blend of several mushroom species, because "the whole is greater than the sum of its parts." For one thing, it is easier for pathogens in your body to adapt and become resistant to one mushroom than to several. Secondly, each mushroom species has a unique arsenal of anti-infective and immunomodulating agents.
[...]

Now that you have the overview, let's take a look at a few of my favorite health-enhancing mushroom species. We'll start with a delicious little mushroom you have probably seen on your dinner plate or at your local market—the shiitake.

Shiitake (Lentinula edodes)

Shiitake is a popular culinary mushroom used in dishes around the world. It contains a number of health-stimulating agents, including lentinan, the polysaccharide for which it was named. Lentinan has been isolated and used to treat stomach and other cancers due to its antitumor properties, but has also been found to protect your liver, relieve other stomach ailments (hyperacidity, gallstones, ulcers), anemia, ascites, and pleural effusion.

One of the more remarkable scientific studies demonstrating shiitake's antitumor effect was a Japanese animal study, where mice suffering from sarcoma were given shiitake extract. Six of 10 mice had complete tumor regression, and with slightly higher concentrations, all ten mice showed complete tumor regression.

Shiitake mushrooms also demonstrate antiviral (including HIV, hepatitis, and the "common cold"), antibacterial, and antifungal effects; blood sugar stabilization; reduced platelet aggregation; and reduced atherosclerosis. Shiitake also contains eritadenine, which has strong cholesterol-lowering properties.

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum)

Reishi is known as Lingzhi in China, or "spirit plant." It's also been called "Mushroom of Immortality"—a nickname that kind of says it all. Reishi has been used medicinally in Asia for thousands of years. One of its more useful compounds is ganoderic acid (a triterpenoid), which is being used to treat lung cancer, leukemia and other cancers. The list of Reishi's health benefits includes the following

Antibacterial, antiviral (Herpes, Epstein-Barr), antifungal (including Candida) properties
Antiinflammatory, useful for reducing symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
Immune system up-regulation
Normalization of blood cholesterol levels and blood pressure
Reduction of prostate-related urinary symptoms in men

Cordyceps (Cordyceps militaris)

Cordyceps, also called caterpillar fungus or Tochukasu, is a favorite of athletes because it increases ATP production, strength and endurance, and has anti-aging effects. This parasitic mushroom is unique because, in the wild, it grows out of an insect host instead of a plant host. Cordyceps has an enduring history in both traditional Chinese and Tibetan medicine.

Cordyceps has hypoglycemic and possible antidepressant effects, protects your liver and kidneys, increases blood flow, helps normalize your cholesterol levels, and has been used to treat Hepatitis B. It has antitumor properties as well.

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

Turkey Tail is also known as Coriolis, or "cloud mushroom." Science is showing that Turkey Tail mushroom holds an arsenal of cancer-blasting compounds. Two polysaccharide complexes in Turkey Tail are getting a great deal of scientific attention, PSK (or "Kreskin") and PSP, making it the most extensively researched of all medicinal mushrooms with large scale clinical trials.

A seven-year, $2 million NIH-funded clinical study in 2011 found that Turkey Tail mycelium improves immune function when dosed daily to women with stage I–III breast cancer. Immune response was dose-dependent, with no adverse effects.

In addition to breast cancer, Turkey Tail has been found to hold promise for other cancers, including stomach, colorectal, lung, esophageal, nasopharyngeal, cervical, and uterine. PSP has been shown to significantly enhance immune status in 70 to 97 percent of cancer patients. Turkey tail is also being used to treat many different infections, including aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, E. coli, HIV, Herpes, and streptococcus pneumonia, and is hepatoprotective. It may also be useful for CFIDS.

Himematsutake (Agaricus blazei)

The last mushroom I'd like to mention is the newcomer on the block: Himematsutake, also called Royal Sun Agaricus, a relative of the common button mushroom. Himematsutake was not cultivated in the East until fairly recently but is now a very popular natural medicine, used by almost a half million Japanese.

Himematsutake mushroom is attracting many scientists worldwide due to its remarkable anticancer properties related to six special polysaccharides. Like many other medicinal mushrooms, this fungus can also protect you from the damaging effects of radiation and chemotherapy. But its benefits don't stop there—Himematsutake can also decrease insulin resistance in diabetics, normalize your cholesterol, improve your hair and skin, and even treat polio.

There are many more mushrooms deserving mention—far too many to include here. But at least you can begin to appreciate the scope of benefits mushrooms have to offer, based on the handful of examples above.


Final Thoughts

A carefully designed blend of medicinal fungi can deliver a powerful therapeutic punch, whether you just wish to help protect yourself from seasonal colds or flu, or you have a more serious condition such as cancer. Either way, these special mushrooms can be an excellent adjunct to a healthful diet and lifestyle to improve your immune health. If you are interested in more information about medicinal mushrooms, you might consider visiting the following sites:

Healing-Mushrooms.net is an encyclopedia of medicinal mushrooms with a searchable database, abundant resources and fungi photos
MedicalMushrooms.net is another encyclopedic database with information about many of the medicinal mushrooms
MushroomExpert.com can help you with mushroom identification
Paul Stamets' YouTube video channel has about 30 videos of wild mushroom hunts and all sorts of informational videos, including mushroom identification and cultivation
And there's this about mushroom broths:

Boosts Immune System: Not all mushrooms are the same, similarly not all mushroom broths are the same. The mushroom broths prepared from shitake mushrooms are found to have a very positive effect on immune system; they demonstrated high anti-cancerous activity and helped body to fight against infections.

http://fawesome.ifood.tv/health/357084-mushroom-broth-health-benefits
And here's a pretty interesting book on mushrooms. It's on Google Books so if you click on the link it will take you to the section that lists the different antibacterials isolated from different mushrooms:

Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World
MAÏTAKE (Grifolia frondosa)

"Leading researchers and scientists have studied maitake and found that it contains many valuable nutrients, including vitamins C, D, B2, and niacin, as well as minerals (especially magnesium and potassium), fiber, and amino acids. In addition, research has confirmed that it is high in a polysaccharide compound called "Beta 1.6 Glucan." This polysaccharide, unique to maitake, is well-known as a cellular immune system-strengthener. Their immunostimulant and anti-tumor activity is well researched in Japan."

"Professor Nanba obtained a polysaccharide (called "D-fraction") from the fruiting body of mushrooms. When administered orally to mice, this extract exhibited anti-tumor activity. Results of another study by Professor Nanba on activity of orally administered mushroom extract, confirmed its tumor neutralizing ability. Dr. Nanba believes it works against tumors because it activated the body's T cells and macrophages (our PacMen[TM])."

"Another Japanese researcher, Kyoko Adachi, studied the anti-tumor activity of beta glucan (obtained from the mushroom) in mice. Professor Adachi and his associates have found this polysaccharide had an anti-tumor effect. It not only directly activates their immune "policemen" (macrophages, natural killer cells, killer T cells, etc.) to attack the tumor cells, but also makes the activities of various fighters (including lymphokines, interleukin-1 and interleukin-2) possible. This stimulates cellular functions and, at the same time, prevents a decrease in the immune" system's ability to fight tumors."

"Grifolan, the extract of the fruit body of Grifola Frondosa is particularly interesting because maitake has immunostimulatory and anti-tumor activity when administered orally to both rodents and man."
www.encognitive.com/node/15707

The T cells

www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/bodys-serial-killers-captured-on-film-destroying-cancer-cells
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Chu said:
I don't know enough to judge, but it's interesting. I don't think for a minute that vaccination is the only culprit, or perhaps even the main one. Mycoplasma can be everywhere!
And both Plague Time and Nicholson suggest that multiple factors (including environment) are likely involved.

I've seen the Tent videos and he does a pretty good job with the Mary's Monkey material - a book well worth the read.

Lots of dots in this big picture!
 

Gandalf

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
The following caught my eye:

zak said:
Cancérisées how cells defend themselves
Among white blood cells there is a kind of white blood cells called killer NK (Natural Killer) whose mission is to inject into cancer cells a deadly toxic substance: the tumostérone - a derivative of vitamin D2. To protect themselves from these attacks, cancer cells are surrounded by a special mucoid substance. To make open access to NK, one must first dissolve the mucus. This is exactly what capable of bromelain. The result is so fast when doses are sufficient, that one can think of a miracle.

But beware dairy products They antagonize the effect of bromelain for two reasons: they strengthen mucoid layer of cancer cells and contain hormones rapid cell growth (milk is for babies who have to grow up fast). When speaking of dairy products, they are all dairy products without exception, including any food made with any dairy derivatives (and it is not easy to escape it) because, for example, 95% of the desserts are dairy based products.
Another very good reason to avoid dairy like the plague... literally.

Someone analyzed my blood living yesterday and that person has worked 25 years in haematology in a hospital and is working since 21 for a private laboratory. May I say that she is very good.

In short, my problem of leaky gut which she had seen last year is gone, very very little presence of yeast (less than last year) and light presence of biofilms. All my red cells are perfect, their shapes are optimal and comparatively to last year, it is a lot better.

I asked her if I could eliminate biofilms by antibiotics and she answered me that the best manner of eliminating them is to take digestive enzymes containing at least "chitinase" in order to destroy the protective membrane which encircles the biofilm. When done, the body should be able to eliminate the bacteria, yeast... which are hidden in the biofilm alone or with the help of antibiotics.

For more info on biofilm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofilm

Biofilms and infectious diseases

Biofilms have been found to be involved in a wide variety of microbial infections in the body, by one estimate 80% of all infections.[35] Infectious processes in which biofilms have been implicated include common problems such as bacterial vaginosis, urinary tract infections, catheter infections, middle-ear infections, formation of dental plaque,[36] gingivitis, coating contact lenses,[37] and less common but more lethal processes such as endocarditis, infections in cystic fibrosis, and infections of permanent indwelling devices such as joint prostheses and heart valves.[38][39] More recently it has been noted that bacterial biofilms may impair cutaneous wound healing and reduce topical antibacterial efficiency in healing or treating infected skin wounds.[40] Early detection of biofilms in wounds is crucial to successful chronic wound management. Although many techniques have developed to identify planktonic bacteria in viable wounds, few have been able to quickly and accurately identify bacterial biofilms. Future studies are needed to find means of identifying and monitoring biofilm colonization at the bedside to permit timely initiation of treatment. [41]

It has recently been shown that biofilms are present on the removed tissue of 80% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic sinusitis. The patients with biofilms were shown to have been denuded of cilia and goblet cells, unlike the controls without biofilms who had normal cilia and goblet cell morphology.[42] Biofilms were also found on samples from two of 10 healthy controls mentioned. The species of bacteria from interoperative cultures did not correspond to the bacteria species in the biofilm on the respective patient's tissue. In other words, the cultures were negative though the bacteria were present.[43]

Biofilms can also be formed on the inert surfaces of implanted devices such as catheters, prosthetic cardiac valves and intrauterine devices. [44]

New staining techniques are being developed to differentiate bacterial cells growing in living animals, e.g. from tissues with allergy-inflammations.[45]

Research has shown that sub-therapeutic levels of β-lactam antibiotics induce biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. This sub-therapeutic level of antibiotic may result from the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in agriculture, or during the normal course of antibiotic therapy. The biofilm formation induced by low-level methicillin was inhibited by DNase, suggesting that the sub-therapeutic levels of antibiotic also induce extracellular DNA release.[46]
Bacteria living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties from free-floating bacteria of the same species, as the dense and protected environment of the film allows them to cooperate and interact in various ways. One benefit of this environment is increased resistance to detergents and antibiotics, as the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of cells protect the interior of the community. In some cases antibiotic resistance can be increased a thousandfold
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
LQB said:
Chu said:
I don't know enough to judge, but it's interesting. I don't think for a minute that vaccination is the only culprit, or perhaps even the main one. Mycoplasma can be everywhere!
And both Plague Time and Nicholson suggest that multiple factors (including environment) are likely involved.

I've seen the Tent videos and he does a pretty good job with the Mary's Monkey material - a book well worth the read.

Lots of dots in this big picture!
Well, I have to say that I'm pretty flabbergasted by the whole thing. I had NO IDEA that all of these things would come out in this topic. Heck, I was just looking for a treatment for a cluster of autoimmune conditions... When I first read about the amoeba protocol, I recalled what the Cs had said about parasitical infestation and mentioned it early in the thread. But, lordy mercy! I did not know it was going to be the can of worms it has proven to be. This is a whole new rabbit hole.
 
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riclapaz

Dagobah Resident
According to the protocol, So They need to use a granular form of doxycycline, in case you can not get it, especially for the cost, and customs processes to buy in another country, it is feasible to do with capsules containing excipients, or definitely is no go? any advice please :/
 

shijing

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Chu said:
Apologies if this has already been shared, but I couldn't find it.
I actually shared this earlier in the thread, along with a couple of other videos and some links about the weaponization of mycoplasmas:

https://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,38053.msg582446.html#msg582446

This link that Yas posted a few days ago also mentions this particular topic, and links off to other sites about it:

http://healthyprotocols.com/2_mycoplasma.htm

I'm hoping to place Project Daylily in my next book order, because it would be good to find out more about the weaponization side of this issue. FWIW, Garth Nicolson's personal site, which has links to a couple of these topics, is here:

http://www.immed.org/

I'm also wondering if there may be a connection between homosexuality and infection -- if it were so, initial infection would have to occur early, possibly in the womb. If there's anything to this, it may be part of the explanation why the gay population was targeted for other biological experiments in the '80s as some researchers have suggested -- if it was understood that there was already an underlying infection present in that demographic, then it would have made them more vulnerable to additional coinfections.

Gandalf said:
I asked her if I could eliminate biofilms by antibiotics and she answered me that the best manner of eliminating them is to take digestive enzymes containing at least "chitinase" in order to destroy the protective membrane which encircles the biofilm. When done, the body should be able to eliminate the bacteria, yeast... which are hidden in the biofilm alone or with the help of antibiotics.
One of the things that's supposed to be good for breaking up biofilms are anti-mucolytics, like NAC and guaifenesin -- they break down the mucal layer that allow the various microorganisms to adhere together, so that the organisms themselves are more vulnerable to treatment.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
Gandalf said:

" In fact, the study of antibiotic action and resistance has contributed significantly to our knowledge of cell structure and function.""

Origins and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2937522/

Mutation Frequencies and Antibiotic Resistance:
aac.asm.org/content/44/7/1771.full

And about Integrons: agents of bacterial evolution:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16845431
mmbr.asm.org/content/74/3/417/F5.expansion.html

Also about Parvome:
schaechter.asmblog.org/schaechter/2014/05/terms-of-biology-the-parvome.html
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
riclapaz said:
According to the protocol, So They need to use a granular form of doxycycline, in case you can not get it, especially for the cost, and customs processes to buy in another country, it is feasible to do with capsules containing excipients, or definitely is no go? any advice please :/
I think this must be put into perspective. You will hardly find pharmaceuticals without excipients. In fact, flagyl, the brand name of metronidazol has wheat starch. Compared to that, if you get prescribed a pharmaceutical with potato starch, that is progress. Garth Nicolson reports that some react to the excipients in the capsule, so granular forms should be favored.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
It is a good summary of his papers, worthwhile to watch entirely.

In regards to Autistic Spectrum Disorders and "parasitic" infections among the children of Gulf War veterans, there is a paper shared earlier in this thread, but I found the following one which is more specific.

IMO, the link with ADHD is very important. It relates to cognitive dysfunction and "parasitic" infections. The link with multiple vaccinations is also interesting:

Chronic Mycoplasmal Infections in Gulf War Veterans’ Children and Autism Patients
Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, 1 Paul Berns, MD, 1 Robert Gan, MD, 1 and Jeorg Haier, MD, PhD2

_http://www.gulfwarvets.com/chronic_infections.htm

Abstract

Autism patients have systemic bacterial, viral and fungal infections that may play an important part in their illnesses. We found that immediate family members of veterans diagnosed with Gulf War Illnesses (GWI) often complain of fatigue and other problems, and upon analysis they report similar signs and symptoms as their veteran family members, except that their children are often diagnosed with Autism. Since a relatively common finding in GWI patients is a bacterial infection due to Mycoplasma fermentans, we examined military families (149 patients: 42 veterans, 40 spouses, 32 other relatives and 35 children with at least one family complaint of illness) selected from a group of 110 veterans with GWI who tested positive (~42%) for mycoplasmal infections. Consistent with previous results, over 80% of GWI patients who were positive for blood mycoplasmal infections had only one Mycoplasma species, M. fermentans. In healthy control subjects the incidence of any mycoplasmal infection was ~8.5% and none were found to have multiple mycoplasmal species (P<0.001). In 107 family members of mycoplasma-positive GWI patients there were 57 patients (53%) that had essentially the same signs and symptoms as the veterans and were diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS/ME) and/or Fibromyalgia Syndrome. The majority of children (n=35) in this group were diagnosed with Autism. Most of these CFS or Autism patients also had mycoplasmal infections compared to the few non-symptomatic family members (P<0.001), and the most common species found was M. fermentans. In contrast, in the few non-symptomatic family members that tested mycoplasma-positive, the Mycoplasma species were usually different from the species found in the GWI patients. The results suggest that a subset of GWI patients have mycoplasmal infections, and these infections can be transmitted to immediate family members who subsequently display similar signs and symptoms, except for their children who are often diagnosed with Autism. In a separate study in Central California we examined a group of Autism patients and also found a high incidence of mycoplasmal infections, but in contrast to the military families a variety of Mycoplasma species were detected.

Keywords: Autism, fatiguing illnesses, mycoplasmal infections

1. Introduction

Children with Autism generally suffer from an inability to properly communicate, form relationships with others and respond appropriately to their environment. Autism patients do not all share the same signs and symptoms but tend to share certain social, communication, motor and sensory problems that affect their behavior in predictable ways. These children often display repetitive actions and develop troublesome fixations with specific objects, and they are often painfully sensitive to certain sounds, tastes and smells [1]. These signs and symptoms are thought to be due to abnormalities in brain function or structure. In some patients there are also a number of other less specific chronic signs and symptoms. Among these are fatigue, headaches, gastrointestinal and vision problems and occasional intermittent low-grade fevers and other signs and symptoms that are generally excluded in the diagnosis of Autism.

Autism causes are unknown and may include genetic defects, heavy metal, chemical and biological exposures, among others, and are probably different in each patient. However, among Autism patients there may be similarities in genetic defects and environmental exposures [2, 3] that are important in patient morbidity (sickness) or in illness progression. Other chronic illnesses have some of the same chronic signs and symptoms, suggesting that there may be some overlap in the underlying causes of these conditions or at least in the factors that cause illness or morbidity or illness progression.

The signs and symptoms in many, perhaps even a majority, of chronic illness patients may be due, in part, to systemic chronic infections (bacteria, viruses, fungi) that can penetrate into the central nervous system (CNS). Such infections often follow acute or chronic heavy metal, chemical, biological (viral, bacterial, fungal infections) exposures or environmental insults or even multiple vaccines that have the potential to suppress the immune system and leave children susceptible to opportunistic infections [2-5]. These illnesses generally evolve slowly over time in a multi-step process that may require genetic susceptibility along with multiple toxic exposures.

Chronic infections may be an important element in the development of Autism. Such infections are usually held in check by immune surveillance, but they can take hold and become a problem if they can avoid host immunity and penetrate and hide in various tissues and organs, including cells of the CNS and peripheral nervous system. When such infections occur, they may cause many of the complex signs and symptoms seen in various chronic illnesses [5, 6]. Changes in environmental responses and increased titers to various endogenous viruses as well as bacterial and fungal infections have been commonly seen in chronic illnesses [5, 6].

One type of airborne infection that has received renewed interest of late as an important cause, cofactor or opportunistic infection in various chronic illnesses is represented by relatively primitive intracellular bacteria. These bacteria, principally Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Coxiella, Brucella, Borrelia, etc. are not as well known as other agents in causing disease but are now considered important emerging pathogens in various chronic diseases. In fact, a majority of patients with various chronic illnesses show evidence of these infections in their blood [5, 6].

Autism patients often show their first signs and symptoms after multiple childhood immunizations [2]. Rimland [2] noted that the sharp rise in Autism rates only occurred after the multiple vaccine MMR came into widespread use. In the U.S. children typically receive as many as 33 vaccines, a dramatic increase in the use of childhood vaccines over the last few decades. Such vaccines often contain mercury and other preservatives [3]. Commercial vaccines have also been examined for contaminating microorganisms, and one study found that approximately 6% of commercial vaccines were contaminated with Mycoplasmas [6]. Thus we examined the extent of mycoplasmal infections in patients with Autism. We were aided in this examination by data that we collected on families of Gulf War veterans where there was a high incidence of Autism in their children [8].

[...]

4. Discussion

The data presented here and elsewhere [8] document that the chronic infections found in Gulf War veterans with GWI can be found in symptomatic family members, including their children with Autism. Because of the size of this cohort, we cannot extrapolate our results to the entire GWI patient population or their family members [8]. First, our patient sample was not randomly selected. The presence of a positive mycoplasma test result on a veteran with GWI who reported illness in his/her immediate family formed the criteria for inclusion in the study. Although chronic illnesses in immediate family members were commonly seen in our study, which examined families of mycoplasma-positive GWI patients, these illnesses are expected to be more difficult to find in the general GWI population where chemical, radiological and environmental exposures probably account for the majority of cases [17]. Second, GWI patients and their family members were recruited from veterans groups, word of mouth, physician referrals and the Institute for Molecular Medicine website (www.immed.org); they were not recruited from specific military units. Although some of these patients were examined by physicians at our associated clinics, most were seen by their own private physicians. Fourth, the validity of PCR techniques for Mycoplasma species detection has been questioned. In our studies, however, the sensitivity and specificity of the PCR method for Mycoplasma species detection were determined by examining serial dilutions of purified DNA from M. fermentans, M. pneumoniae, M. hominis and M. genitalium or the microorganisms themselves in blood samples. The primers produced the expected amplification product size in all test species, which was confirmed by hybridization using the appropriate 32P-labeled internal probe. Amounts as low as a few fg of purified DNA were detectable for all species with the specific internal probes. There was no cross-reactivity between the internal probes of one species and the PCR product from another species [12].

Symptomatic family members of GWI patients were diagnosed with CSF or a related fatiguing illness, Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS), but their symptomatic children were usually diagnosed with Autism or ADHD [8]. At least 50-60% of CFS and/or FMS patients are positive for mycoplasmal infections [5, 6, 9, 12-16]. However, in contrast to mycoplasma-positive GWI patients and their mycoplasma-positive family members diagnosed with CFS/ME or Autism, several species of mycoplasmas in addition to M. fermentans were found in CSF/ME and FMS patients from non-military families [12-16]. Similarly, we also found various species of mycoplasma in children diagnosed with Autism from Central California.

There could be different sources of the mycoplasmal infections found in GWI patients [17]. An important possible source for the mycoplasmal infections found in GWI patients is the multiple vaccines that were administered during the time of deployment to the Persian Gulf. A strong association has been found between GWI and the multiple vaccines that were administered during deployment [18-20]. Steele [20] found a three-fold increased incidence of GWI in non-deployed veterans who had been vaccinated in preparation for deployment, compared to non-deployed, non-vaccinated veterans, and Mahan et al. [21] found a two-times higher incidence of GWI signs and symptoms in veterans who recalled receiving anthrax vaccinations versus those who thought they had not. Although the mycoplasmal infections found in GWI patients could have come from several sources, including offensive Biological Warfare attacks [22], we consider the most likely source of the mycoplasmal infections in GWI patients was the multiple vaccines administered during deployment [17]. Indeed, the signs and symptoms that have developed in Armed Forces personnel who recently received the anthrax vaccine are similar to those found in GWI patients. On some military bases this has resulted in chronic illnesses in as many as 7-10% of personnel receiving the vaccine [23]. Undetectable microorganism contaminants in vaccines could have resulted in illness, and this may have been more likely in individuals with compromised immune systems caused by chemical and other exposures [17]. Similarly, the onset of Autism in children from civilian families is also associated with multiple vaccines [2]. Mycoplasmal infections could have originated from the vaccines or from opportunistic infections in immune suppressed children.

Contamination with mycoplasmas has been found in commercial vaccines. In one study 6% of commercial vaccines were found to be contaminated with mycoplasmas [7]. Thus the vaccines used in the Gulf War should be considered as a possible source of the chronic infections found in mycoplasma-positive GWI patients and by airborne transmission in their mycoplasma-positive, CFS-symptomatic family members. And the appearance of mycoplasmal infections in children diagnosed with Autism from civilian families may eventually be linked to the multiple vaccines received during childhood either as a source or from opportunistic infections in immune suppressed recipients of multiple vaccines.
Yes, it looks like transmarginal inhibition, making people predisposed to these infections.
 

shijing

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Gandalf said:
For more info on biofilm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofilm
FWIW, there are some additional links and videos about biofilms here:

https://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,38053.msg581904/topicseen.html#msg581904

I agree that a good understanding of biofilms will be helpful in clearing the body of pathogenic organisms, since doing whatever is possible to eradicate them at the outset should cut down on overall treatment duration.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
More possible clues as to how mycoplasmas could damage the nervous system:

Controversies in Neurological Infectious Diseases

_http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/410864

John E. Greenlee, MD and John W. Rose, MD, Neurology Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Neurology, University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Semin Neurol. 2000;20(3)

Myalgias and headaches are common complications of infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Neurological illness was first associated with M. pneumoniae in 1943.[102] Over the years, both peripheral and central nervous system complications of M. pneumoniae infection have been reported with and without antecedent systemic symptoms.[103-106] Nonetheless, however, the actual ability of M. pneumoniae to cause neurological disease has remained a matter of debate.

Peripheral complications of M. pneumoniae infection have included both demyelinating and axonal neuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. These are, in comparison with CNS complications, better understood and more clearly the result of host immune response. Axonal neuropathy has been reported following M. pneumoniae infection and has been associated with circulating IgM anti-GM1 anti-bodies.[107]M. pneumoniae-associated acute demyelinating peripheral neuropathy has been associated with anti-bodies to Gal-C.[108]

The respective roles of acute infection per se and the host immune response in the CNS complications of M. pneumoniae infection are less well understood. That M. pneumoniae may invade the CNS is unquestioned.[109,110] Furthermore, although very few workers have studied persistence of mycoplasma in CSF over time, Abramovitz et al, in studies of two patients, were able to demonstrate the organism in CSF up to 8 weeks following the onset of neurological symptoms.[110] Our current knowledge suggests three groups of syndromes that may complicate M. pneumoniae infection: acute meningoencephalitis, which appears to be associated with direct CNS invasion; delayed neurological complications, which may or may not be solely autoimmune; and, least commonly, a CNS vasculitis.

Neurological Complications Directly Associated With M. Pneumoniae Infection

These include aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. [104,111-113] In a number of cases in the literature, however, the duration of apparent M. pneumoniae infection prior to the onset of neurological symptoms is not known.[109]

"Postinfectious" Complications of M. Pneumoniae Infection

The majority of neurological illnesses associated with M. pneumoniae infection have occurred at some interval of time following infection and, in cases with a fatal outcome, have involved neuropathological findings of perivascular infiltrates or demyelination, ball hemorrhages, or edema consistent with postinfectious leukoencephalitis.[114-117] Transverse myelitis has also been described, as has an encephalitis lethargica-like illness with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes in the basal ganglia.[118-120] {Related to dopamine. Garth Nicolson also notices how there are "alterations in motor, sensory and coordination systems and cognitive dysfunctions" in people with mycoplasma infections}In these cases, organisms have not been detectable in brain or spinal fluid by electron microscopy, culture, or PCR.[121,122] Fernandez et al studied two patients with encephalomyelitis whose onset followed systemic M. pneumoniae infection. Organisms could not be cultured from CSF or detected in CSF using a genomic probe. Specific antibody could not be detected in CSF from one of the patients, and low titers found in the second patient were thought secondary to contamination of CSF with blood.[122] In contrast to these findings, a few reports have described detection of organisms in patients with postinfectious encephalomyelitis. Both patients reported by Abramovitz et al developed neurological symptoms over 2 weeks after the onset of respiratory symptoms. Narita et al,[122a] in 1992, detected M. pneumoniae DNA sequences in four of six patients with neurological complications of M. pneumoniae infection. In three patients, the onset of neurological symptoms followed respiratory symptoms by 8 to 14 days; the fourth patient did not have respiratory symptoms. The continued presence of organisms in patients with otherwise typical postinfectious encephalomyelitis does not, of course, exclude an immune causation of the neurological illness.

In a few patients, M. pneumoniae infection has been associated with a syndrome of cerebrovascular thrombosis or of capillary injury without evidence of demyelination.[104,123] The pathogenesis of neurological injury in these cases and their relationship to M. pneumoniae infection are not known.

Summary

That M. pneumoniae can invade the nervous system is certain, and a growing body of evidence supports the ability of this agent to cause neurological disease directly. Similarly, a number of individual case reports demonstrate that the organism is associated with postinfectious central and peripheral nervous system injury. In some of these cases, the mechanism of autoimmune injury has been defined.[107,108,117] In many cases, however, the respective pathogenic roles of the organism it-self and of host immune response remain undefined and await further studies employing careful imaging as well as modern serological and molecular diagnostic methods.

***

Since its initial description by Charcot more than 100 years ago, multiple sclerosis (MS) has been suspected of being related to infection. In the past few years, investigators have identified two newer agents, Chlamydia pneumoniae and HHV-6, in patients with MS. The studies concerning both agents have been of great interest, but controversy nonetheless surrounds the relationship of either agent to demyelinating disease.

Chlamydia Pneumoniae

In 1998, Sriram et al reported a patient with progressive MS whose condition continued to decline despite multiple courses of immunosuppressive treatment.[124] The patient's serum and CSF contained antibodies specific for C. pneumoniae, and the presence of C. pneumoniae in CSF was confirmed by both PCR and culture. Following antibiotic treatment directed at C. pneumoniae, the patient improved dramatically from a pretreatment expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score of 7.0 to 3.0 after treatment. The case not only suggested that a common pathogen might be identified in MS but also raised the hope that MS might be treated successfully with antibiotic therapy. Sriram et al. have subsequently gone on to show that C. pneumoniae can be detected by PCR and/or culture in a high percentage of their MS patients, especially those with chronic progressive disease.[125] Most interestingly, they further demonstrated that oligoclonal immunoglobulins in MS CSF may bind C. pneumoniae antigens, whereas immunoglobulins in the CSF of patients with other inflammatory diseases of the CNS failed to do so.[125] In these studies, however, normal CSF from occasional patients was positive for C. pneumoniae by PCR or culture.

Other investigators have been much less successful in demonstrating C. pneumoniae DNA or infectious organisms in CSF from patients with MS.[126] To date C. pneumoniae has not been detected in CNS tissue from MS patients using techniques such as immunohisto-chemistry or in situ hybridization, nor has the organism been cultured directly from brain as opposed to CSF. Although cellular immune response is known to be of great importance in the pathogenesis of MS, cellular immune response to C. pneumoniae organisms has not been studied in MS patients.

The role of C. pneumoniae infection in MS is therefore yet to be defined, and the contribution of the organism to the pathogenesis of MS remains to be fully elucidated. The organism potentially could be etiologic in some patients with MS.[124-130] A role for the organism in the pathogenesis of MS would be likely if antigens from this organism were found to absorb, specifically, oligoclonal bands from the CSF of large numbers of MS patients, because data of this sort would be comparable to those found in other CNS infections in which pathogen-specific oligoclonal CSF immunoglobulins are present. Isolation of the organism from MS lesions would be another major step in confirming a role for this pathogen. However, it is equally possible that C. pneumoniae, even if frequently detected, may not be a causative agent in MS but rather, like other infectious agents, may influence the course of MS indirectly by potentiating the dis-ease. In this scenario, the organism could nonspecifically stimulate the immune system, resulting in relapse or progression of disease. Alternatively, C. pneumoniae could activate macrophages directly or damage cerebral endothelial cells and add to ongoing damage at sites of demyelination.

Finally, it remains possible despite promising early evidence that C. pneumoniae is not important in the initiation and evolution of MS for the majority of patients.

Careful attention to the details of specimen handling, PCR, and culture techniques will be required to determine whether there is a significant role for C. pneumoniae in MS. Until more evidence is provided, antibiotic treatment for MS should be reserved for patients in well-designed clinical trials.

Human Herpesvirus 6

HHV-6 is a neurotropic virus that can be detected in normal brain and in the brains of patients with MS.[131] The virus is known to produce encephalitis in the setting of impaired host immunity, including patients with HIV infection and organ transplantation.[132] The virus may infect both oligodendrocytes and microglia in culture and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo.[133,134] A receptor for the virus, CD46, has been identified.[135] The virus may potentially be highly pathogenic when in the presence of coinfecting viruses such as CMV or HIV[.[132] The virus genome has been demonstrated to integrate into the human genome on chromosome 17, giving it the potential to persist despite intact host immune response.[136] {Not good!}

Sola et al, using PCR methodology, reported detection of HHV-6 DNA in PBMCs from an MS patient in 1993.[137] Since then, many studies have evaluated serum and CSF antibody titers for HHV-6 and PCR of PBMCs and CSF; these studies have produced widely varying results.[138-149] An important study by Challoner et al, using molecular virological techniques, demonstrated viral nucleic acid of HHV-6B in both MS and normal brains, suggesting that the virus may be resident in the human CNS. Immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated a preponderance of virus-specific staining around demyelinating lesions, with much less staining in the normal-appearing white matter of the MS brains.[150] Further, the virus frequently appeared to be associated with oligodendrocytes.[150] Subsequently, Sanders et al, in PCR studies of MS brain tissue, reported a greater association of HHV-6 with active than inactive plaques.[151] It should be noted that these investigators also detected other herpesviruses including herpes simplex virus and varicellazoster virus.[151] It has been demonstrated that HHV-6 may be detected around areas of demyelination in other diseases in addition to MS, including PML.[152]

There are intriguing case reports of fulminant demyelinating disease and encephalitis in MS patients in which HHV-6 has been clearly identified as a pathogen.[153-155] These cases suggest that the virus may have a role in some cases of MS or could be a complicating factor potentiating MS. Overall, the evidence at present is inconsistent and it is unlikely that HHV-6 is a primary pathogen in the majority of patients. It is also possible that HHV-6 is the primary pathogen in some of the cases of MS, whereas in others it may facilitate disease progression. Further investigations of HHV-6 in large patient populations -- in particular at onset of the disease prior to any immune therapy -- may help to define the role of the virus in MS. Standardization of immunological and PCR techniques will be most useful in accurately determining immunoglobulin titers and presence of viral DNA. Detection of viral DNA in acellular CSF is very important in future studies to ensure that the nucleic acid was not due to the presence of infected cells that migrated from peripheral blood.[156,157]

Although HHV-6 is a herpesvirus and potentially susceptible to antiviral therapy, it would be premature to advocate the general use of these medications for MS patients. These are best restricted to clinical trials. If treatment is to be initiated, it will be important to determine the subclass of the virus because HHV-6B is less sensitive to some antiviral agents than HHV-6A.
 

riclapaz

Dagobah Resident
Gaby said:
riclapaz said:
According to the protocol, So They need to use a granular form of doxycycline, in case you can not get it, especially for the cost, and customs processes to buy in another country, it is feasible to do with capsules containing excipients, or definitely is no go? any advice please :/
I think this must be put into perspective. You will hardly find pharmaceuticals without excipients. In fact, flagyl, the brand name of metronidazol has wheat starch. Compared to that, if you get prescribed a pharmaceutical with potato starch, that is progress. Garth Nicolson reports that some react to the excipients in the capsule, so granular forms should be favored.
Thank you for your Gaby answer, I am currently doing a budget, all necessary for this protocol supplements, and as you mentioned, most are excipients, today I made a general blood test, also an iron profile to watch as he walks all, I'm making a protocol with herbs, black walnut, wormwood, today is my day 5, according to the bottle is 10 days, I noticed a very strong fatigue, mainly in the afternoon, I have to take a siesta to 3 hours, I'm surprised by this, yesterday and today's different, I feel more energetic, single vitamin c along the day, helps me a lot.

Someone mentioned the zeolite, to help detoxification by toxins, last year I spent several months taking zeolite, really could not notice any help, however, the day yesterday and today have taken zeolite, and podira be if I this I help with the toxins, because I feel better, i do not know, I will continue with the zeolite, at least before jumping to the protocol doxycycline.


Again thank you very much for your help Gaby :flowers:
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Here is the article "The prolonged virological and clinical efficacy of Todoxin in the treatment of HIV-1 infection" in German raum&zeit magazine. The article is written in German and English: _http://www.torexin.co.rs/images/slike/knjige/Raum&zeit.pdf

I made the Word documents out of the introduction article that is only in German and used GT for translation to English.
 

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Hesper

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
LQB said:
Chu said:
I don't know enough to judge, but it's interesting. I don't think for a minute that vaccination is the only culprit, or perhaps even the main one. Mycoplasma can be everywhere!
And both Plague Time and Nicholson suggest that multiple factors (including environment) are likely involved.

I've seen the Tent videos and he does a pretty good job with the Mary's Monkey material - a book well worth the read.

Lots of dots in this big picture!
Well, I have to say that I'm pretty flabbergasted by the whole thing. I had NO IDEA that all of these things would come out in this topic. Heck, I was just looking for a treatment for a cluster of autoimmune conditions... When I first read about the amoeba protocol, I recalled what the Cs had said about parasitical infestation and mentioned it early in the thread. But, lordy mercy! I did not know it was going to be the can of worms it has proven to be. This is a whole new rabbit hole.
Yeah, talk about cutting edge research! I'm amazed that you've managed to find a huge part of the iron puzzle through this research. The fact that our bodies could be waging nutritional warfare against parasites puts the whole problem in an entirely new context. It also seems to be a big piece of the whole 4D/3D connection. To see that parasites could be critical for inter-density manipulation (and an astonishingly vast array of diseases) opens an entirely new realm of protection and "de-bugging". I'm finishing a few books, one on preparedness and the other being Personality Shaping, but I'm going to dive into Plague Time next. Absolutely astonishing stuff!
 
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