AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES CAUSED BY AN INFECTION?

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I did a little research about possible connection between amygdalin and iodine and this is what I found:

Impact of cyanogen iodide in killing of Escherichia coli by the lactoperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-(pseudo)halide system

In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the heme protein lactoperoxidase is able to oxidize thiocyanate and iodide to hypothiocyanite, reactive iodine species, and the inter(pseudo)halogen cyanogen iodide. The killing efficiency of these oxidants and of the lactoperoxidase-H2O2-SCN−/I− system was investigated on the bioluminescent Escherichia coli K12 strain that allows time-resolved determination of cell viability. Among the tested oxidants, cyanogen iodide was most efficient in killing E. coli, followed by reactive iodine species and hypothiocyanite. Thereby, the killing activity of the LPO-H2O2-SCN−/I− system was greatly enhanced in comparison to the sole application of iodide when I− was applied in two- to twenty-fold excess over SCN−. Further evidence for the contribution of cyanogen iodide in killing of E. coli was obtained by applying methionine. This amino acid disturbed the killing of E. coli mediated by reactive iodine species (partial inhibition) and cyanogen iodide (total inhibition), but not by hypothiocyanite. Changes in luminescence of E. coli cells correlate with measurements of colony forming units after incubation of cells with the LPO-H2O2-SCN−/I− system or with cyanogen iodide. Taken together, these results are important for the future optimization of the use of lactoperoxidase in biotechnological applications.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27629563
More about lactoperoxidase system and iodide:

The lactoperoxidase (LP) system is a natural antimicrobial system, the use of which has been suggested as a preservative in foods and pharmaceuticals. The effect of adding iodide to the LP system, the chemical stability and the change in antimicrobial effectiveness during storage was studied. Addition of iodide with thiocyanate increased the fungicidal and bactericidal effect against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. (...)

LP itself has no antimicrobial activity, but with H2O2 and thiocyanate ion (SCN–) it forms a natural antimicrobial system, the LP system. LP catalyses by means of H2O2 the oxidation of thiocyanate, forming hypothiocyanite, which has bacteriostatic activity ( Thomas et al. 1994 ). (...)

Gram-negative bacteria are more difficult to kill and inhibition is more dependent on temperature (between 5 and 20 °C) and pH (5·5–7), but iodide (I–) promotes killing independent of these factors. Also, fungi are killed in LP system with I– as the electron donor ( Lehrer 1969).

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2672.2000.01098.x/full
And another article on the same subject:

Biological Activity of Hypothiocyanite

Biological activity of hypothiocyanite on bacteria and possible defense mechanism of the bacteria. Reversible inhibition is observed in that (i) hypothiocyanite is not reactive against all thiols and (ii) if hypothiocyanite is removed or diluted, the pathogen recovers. Irreversible inhibition is linked to (i) long period of incubation, (ii) the bacterial species, and (iii) hypothiocyanite concentration.

Biological Action of Oxidized Iodide

Biological activity of hypoiodite or iodine on bacteria. Irreversible inhibition is observed and could be linked to (i) oxidation of thiol groups, NAD(P)H, and thioether groups, (ii) high reactivity of HOI/I2 against thiol and reduced nicotinamide nucleotides, and (iii) the incorporation of iodide in tyrosine residue of protein (iodination of protein).

The biological action of oxidized iodide (Figure 9) is similar to that of hypothiocyanite but differs in that (i) the reactivity of oxidized iodide is complete against thiol group and (ii) cells did not recover after removing of oxidized iodide [59].

Due to the cofactor role of I−, inhibition of respiration in Escherichia coli in the presence of LPO, H2O2, and I− is complete with only 10 μM NaI, whereas 100 μM of solely I2 is necessary to obtain complete inhibition. This is directly related to the oxidation of sulfhydryls, not to the percentage of iodine incorporation [92, 93].

E. coli seems to be more sensitive if the bacteria are incubated together with the entire system (enzyme, H2O2, and iodide) rather than adding several minutes after mixing the enzyme with its substrates. This could be linked to the formation of an unstable reactive intermediate [52].

The activity of the I− peroxidase system is more effective against E. coli than the SCN− system, in that lower I− concentrations are necessary, all sulfhydryls are oxidized, and cells do not recover even if the amount of I2 is not sufficient to oxidize all SH groups [59, 80].

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/er/2014/517164/
About thiocyanate (SCN):

SCN enters the body from the diet (such as cruciferous vegetables) [5] or is synthesized from cyanide by sulfurtransferase enzymes including mitochondrial rhodanese and cytosolic mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase [6].

The ubiquity of cyanogens in plant matter make it the most obvious dietary source of SCN and provide a rationale for the distribution of rhodanese activity across species, particularly ruminants where some segments of the alimentary tract may exceed the liver in sulfurtransferase activity [8].

Extracellular fluids are abundant sources of SCN (Table 1). Plasma values of SCN typically range between 5 and 50 μM in human non-smokers [11,12] and much higher in smokers [13].

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3983948/

Thiocyanate is known to be an important part in the biosynthesis of hypothiocyanite by a lactoperoxidase. Thus the complete absence of thiocyanate or reducted thiocyanate in the human body, (e.g., cystic fibrosis) is damaging to the human host defense system. Thiocyanate is a potent competitive inhibitor of the thyroid sodium-iodide symporter.

http://www.liquisearch.com/thiocyanate/biological_chemistry_of_thiocyanate_in_medicine

Thiocyanate is produced by the reaction of elemental sulfur or thiosulfate with cyanide:

8 CN− + S8 → 8 SCN−
CN− + S2O32− → SCN− + SO32−

The second reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme sulfotransferase known as rhodanase and may be relevant to detoxification of cyanide in the body.

http://www.liquisearch.com/thiocyanate
Smokers can have more thiocyanate than non-smokers. Perhaps this is a reason why smoking is good against bacteria and viruses?

In a Norwegian health study involving 25,300 persons the mean serum thiocyanate level in non-smokers was 33.9 mumol/l for males and 33.5 mumol/l for females. In moderate smokers (five to nine cigarettes per day) the mean level was 59.6 mumol/l for males and 70.9 mumol/l for females. In heavy smokers (greater than 25 cigarettes per day) the mean level was 87.3 mumol/l in males and 99.7 mumol/l in females.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3715377
But this is also interesting:

The range of the individual thiocyanate level was great both in non-smokers and in smokers, resulting in a large overlap. Serum thiocyanate can therefore not distinguish all non-smokers from all smokers.
But how do people get thiocyanate from smoking? Well, just like with bitter apricot kernels, from cyanide!

Tobacco smoke contains considerable amounts of cyanide, which is generated in the burning zone of the tobacco from proteins and nitrate at high temperatures. The amount of cyanide generated from a single cigarette may differ widely depending on the smoking conditions (Scherer, 2006). The cyanide is highly toxic but is rapidly detoxified in the liver of the smoker to thiocyanate by a sulfation process.

Serum concentrations of thiocyanate are two to three times higher in smokers than in nonsmokers. In popula­tions not exposed to excessive amounts of thiocyanate from diet or industrial environmental pollution, thiocyanate concentrations in serum can be used to identify and quantify tobacco smoking (Scherer, 2006; Butts et al., 1974).

In a Belgian study the levels of thiocyanate in serum from heavy smokers were not much different from the serum concentrations found in people in Central Africa with a high intake of cyanide from only partly detoxi­fied cassava (Delange et 1980). Thus, heavy smoking may be as important in the generation of thiocyanate as is severe dietary intake of cyanide, and serum levels of thiocyanate in smokers overlap the levels found in people exposed to severe industrial pollution.

https://books.google.rs/books?id=7v7g5XoCQQwC&pg=PA275&lpg=PA275#v=onepage&q&f=false
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
So, in the end I couldn't find any strong relationship between amygdalin and iodine except that thiocyanate, which is formed from amygdalin, is goitrogen, so people who take amygdalin must supplement with iodine: http://renegadehealth.com/blog/2016/10/21/are-you-the-unwary-victim-of-thiocyanates

Also, there is not much research about antimicrobial or antitumor properties of amygdalin. There is this research, but it's not free: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10068-013-0101-1

And this: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0100-879X2009000400006

I guess that we will have to wait for further research.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Persej said:
Also, there is not much research about antimicrobial or antitumor properties of amygdalin. There is this research, but it's not free: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10068-013-0101-1
Remember that Sci-Hub is your friend:

Think big! Meet the Robin Hood of science
https://www.sott.net/article/312151-Think-big-Meet-the-Robin-Hood-of-science

I'm attaching the article to this post. It reminds me of a couple of seemingly credible testimonials of people who managed their gliomas (aggressive brain cancer) with amygdalin.

Perhaps you can share some impressions from the article if anything stands out for you?
 

Attachments

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thank you Gaby! I didn't know about Sci-Hub. Now I can read everything. :)

About the article, well, what stands out to me is that a lot of these experiments are very poorly done. I mean, many things can have some antimicrobial or antitumor effects, even a lemonade, but it is the question of how much, compared to other things.

Which is the reason why I like the research of Anna Goc very much, because she tested more than 50 things and compared them. But not only that, she combined them and tested them in pairs to see which combinations work the best.

When it comes to amygdalin, I still haven't find a good research about it. Yes, it works on some bacteria, but not all. But Anna found it works on Borrealia, at lest in vitro.

Those who want to listen to Anna can do it here:

https://vimeo.com/channels/1141330/185618239
https://vimeo.com/channels/1141330/185618598

She says that they already started doing the human trials and that she cannot give us the detail at this point, but "so far, so good". So she seems quite happy about it. :)

I hope that we will see the results soon.
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
In Sunday I was fully recovered. Yesterday I took one kernel and had no effect. Today I took two and immediately had faster heart beat and feeling of fever. Right now I feel fine.

In Sunday and yesterday I didn't take iodine, today I did, half hour before eating a kernel, so maybe that played a difference, beside increasing the number of kernels.

From tomorrow I will only take one kernel per day and see if I can feel any difference between the days that I take iodine and when I don't.

I never had such experience with apricot kernels before iodine protocol, even when I was taking more kernels that now.
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
In my previous posts I gave links to several new research articles about Borrealia, the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. In the meantime I also found a lot of new articles about Chlamydia Pneumonia, a bacteria that I'm more interested in. I will give here only a couple of links to the best ones, you can find others trough references. If not, feel free to ask me about them in this topic.

First one is the summarization of several studies about antichlamydial natural products: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309219418_Natural_Products_for_the_Treatment_of_Chlamydiaceae_Infections

Mint teas are also not bad: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273436444_Commercial_peppermint_Menthapiperita_L_teas_Antichlamydial_effect_and_polyphenolic_composition

And here is another very interesting plant - Schisandra. It seems that this plant is very good against C. Pneumonia: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280391600_The_Lignan-containing_Extract_of_Schisandra_chinensis_Berries_Inhibits_the_Growth_of_Chlamydia_pneumonia

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276072109_Dibenzocyclooctadiene_lignans_from_Schisandra_spp_selectively_inhibit_the_growth_of_the_intracellular_bacteria_Chlamydia_pneumoniae_and_Chlamydia_trachomatis

This group from Finland (University of Helsinki) is very active in Chlamydial research, so I hope that we will hear more from them in the future.

Overall, it seems that we have some positive movements in research about usage of natural products in treatment of infections, in this and previous year. I will try to implement as much as I can of this new knowledge in my own protocols and report my results here.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Persej said:
Overall, it seems that we have some positive movements in research about usage of natural products in treatment of infections, in this and previous year. I will try to implement as much as I can of this new knowledge in my own protocols and report my results here.
Highly appreciated. It would be good if we have proved-effective remedies that could be used instead of antibiotics.
 

TheTodd

Jedi
Persej said:
You can find all the research papers that I mentioned in the previous posts on this page: http://www.drrathresearch.org/research/projects/93-research/471-borreliosis-lyme-disease

And supposedly they already tested these natural antibiotics in vivo on animals and they say that they had a 90% reduction of bacteria!
This is a combination that they used:

Vitamin D3
Vitamin B-complex
Vitamin C
Baicalein (Scutellaria baicalensis)
10-HAD (Royal jelly)
Iodine/Kelp
Monolaurin (Coconut oil)
Luteolin (Sophora japonica)
Rosmarinic acid (Rosmarinus officinalis)

http://www.drrathresearch.org/images/attachments/Infectious%20Diseases/Webinar-English_LD_in_vivo.pdf
There are many other possible combinations: http://www.drrathresearch.org/images/attachments/Infectious%20Diseases/Webinar-Beyond-Antibiotics.pdf

I hope that in the future they will also test stevia.
I'm interested in this info on treating Lyme/Borrelia.
So, they mention that they used Iodine/Kelp but I can't seem to find the quantity they used in vivo studies. You can't really know how much of iodine you are getting through kelp and if it's radiated or not. I am very curious if they used the microgram or milligram ranges of iodine because, as I can gather, quantity is the key here (as is with the other supplements; remember, if you will, Mg, C vit, Omega3, iodine nuking...).
 

AD

Padawan Learner
My symptoms have worsened out of no where in the past week. With strong head tightness, mild dizziness, mental disturbances, and paresthesia in legs and arms intensifying. Before this I felt pretty good. I don't if its caused by my cheating on the diet, stress, or iodine. I have stopped taking the lugols, tightned up on the diet and started taking Boswellia. It feels like a MS flare up, can't help but think its nasty infections acting up for whatever reason. Thinking about seeing the doc. Any feedback would help.
 

Altair

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
AD said:
My symptoms have worsened out of no where in the past week. With strong head tightness, mild dizziness, mental disturbances, and paresthesia in legs and arms intensifying. Before this I felt pretty good. I don't if its caused by my cheating on the diet, stress, or iodine. I have stopped taking the lugols, tightned up on the diet and started taking Boswellia. It feels like a MS flare up, can't help but think its nasty infections acting up for whatever reason. Thinking about seeing the doc. Any feedback would help.
What do you mean by cheating on the diet? How many carbs do you eat daily? Is your diet free of gluten and dairy? Personally I wouldn't take iodine as long as the diet is not fixed. Otherwise it might be too much stress for the body!
 

AD

Padawan Learner
Altair said:
AD said:
My symptoms have worsened out of no where in the past week. With strong head tightness, mild dizziness, mental disturbances, and paresthesia in legs and arms intensifying. Before this I felt pretty good. I don't if its caused by my cheating on the diet, stress, or iodine. I have stopped taking the lugols, tightned up on the diet and started taking Boswellia. It feels like a MS flare up, can't help but think its nasty infections acting up for whatever reason. Thinking about seeing the doc. Any feedback would help.
What do you mean by cheating on the diet? How many carbs do you eat daily? Is your diet free of gluten and dairy? Personally I wouldn't take iodine as long as the diet is not fixed. Otherwise it might be too much stress for the body!
Hi,

Have not eatin any grains in 6 months and keep net carbs at 100 or less. But when I cheat its usually eating out but try to eat " as paleo as possible", eating dairy ,or having too much sugar for paleo. Sometimes its due laziness but sometimes Im busy and far from home. Need to prep better
 

Altair

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AD said:
Altair said:
AD said:
My symptoms have worsened out of no where in the past week. With strong head tightness, mild dizziness, mental disturbances, and paresthesia in legs and arms intensifying. Before this I felt pretty good. I don't if its caused by my cheating on the diet, stress, or iodine. I have stopped taking the lugols, tightned up on the diet and started taking Boswellia. It feels like a MS flare up, can't help but think its nasty infections acting up for whatever reason. Thinking about seeing the doc. Any feedback would help.
What do you mean by cheating on the diet? How many carbs do you eat daily? Is your diet free of gluten and dairy? Personally I wouldn't take iodine as long as the diet is not fixed. Otherwise it might be too much stress for the body!
Hi,

Have not eatin any grains in 6 months and keep net carbs at 100 or less. But when I cheat its usually eating out but try to eat " as paleo as possible", eating dairy ,or having too much sugar for paleo. Sometimes its due laziness but sometimes Im busy and far from home. Need to prep better
100 gr carbs might be way too much, even for paleo. Reduce it gradually to reasonable level replacing it with healthy fats. And get rid of dairy!
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
AD said:
It feels like a MS flare up, can't help but think its nasty infections acting up for whatever reason.
It might be a combination of factors. Checking with the doctor is a good idea.
 

Beau

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Altair said:
100 gr carbs might be way too much, even for paleo. Reduce it gradually to reasonable level replacing it with healthy fats. And get rid of dairy!
Indeed. And keep in mind that if you truly want to eat Paleo, one should reduce carb consumption in the winter months to a minimum, as most of our caveman ancestors would likely have had very little access to fruits and vegetables during the winter season.
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
TheTodd said:
I'm interested in this info on treating Lyme/Borrelia.
So, they mention that they used Iodine/Kelp but I can't seem to find the quantity they used in vivo studies. You can't really know how much of iodine you are getting through kelp and if it's radiated or not. I am very curious if they used the microgram or milligram ranges of iodine because, as I can gather, quantity is the key here (as is with the other supplements; remember, if you will, Mg, C vit, Omega3, iodine nuking...).
They haven't yet published scientific papers about their in vivo studies. You can try standard doses of iodine that we use in our iodine protocol. Iodine nuking is probably not necessary if you combine it with other stuff from their list.
 
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