Canning meat/what Equipment is needed, how much canning is necessary

Lot's of good information in this thread.

To add, if you have the financial resources, there are now residential Freeze Dryer machines available from one vendor, Harvest Right. Cost in the USA range from $2200-3300 for a home unit. Freeze drying works by first freezing the food, then lowering the air pressure within the freezing chamber - this changes the evaporation temperature of water. After this is done, heating elements are used to heat areas near the food, which causes the frozen water in the food to turn into a gas without going into a liquid form. The gas is then sucked out. Eventually, there is no moisture left in the food. You can seal the food in mylar bags, and throw in an oxygen absorbing packet. This removes all moisture, oxygen, and sun light from the food. Freeze dried food can last up to 25 years when stored properly. Freeze dried food also retains the highest amount of nutritional value compared to canning and dehydration.

I ended up buying one a few months back when the grocery store shelves in my area were turning up bare. I have the smallest unit they sell - it weighs about 70 lbs, and the pump is another 40 or so. Freeze drying a batch of food takes about 20-24 hours, and the standard pump is pretty damn loud (though there is quieter pump for sale). You have to filter the oil every 4-5 batches. So far I've just been freeze drying meat + veggie meals. I have yet to try one though. My thought process, is you can open a mylar bag, add very hot water to heat and reconstitute the already cooked food, and you're good to go.

 

Yupo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Lot's of good information in this thread.

To add, if you have the financial resources, there are now residential Freeze Dryer machines available from one vendor, Harvest Right. Cost in the USA range from $2200-3300 for a home unit. Freeze drying works by first freezing the food, then lowering the air pressure within the freezing chamber - this changes the evaporation temperature of water. After this is done, heating elements are used to heat areas near the food, which causes the frozen water in the food to turn into a gas without going into a liquid form. The gas is then sucked out. Eventually, there is no moisture left in the food. You can seal the food in mylar bags, and throw in an oxygen absorbing packet. This removes all moisture, oxygen, and sun light from the food. Freeze dried food can last up to 25 years when stored properly. Freeze dried food also retains the highest amount of nutritional value compared to canning and dehydration.

I ended up buying one a few months back when the grocery store shelves in my area were turning up bare. I have the smallest unit they sell - it weighs about 70 lbs, and the pump is another 40 or so. Freeze drying a batch of food takes about 20-24 hours, and the standard pump is pretty damn loud (though there is quieter pump for sale). You have to filter the oil every 4-5 batches. So far I've just been freeze drying meat + veggie meals. I have yet to try one though. My thought process, is you can open a mylar bag, add very hot water to heat and reconstitute the already cooked food, and you're good to go.

Looks like their price has come down a bit? I considered getting one a while back. What put me off (besides price, $4,500 then) was the weight, the noise and the maintenance requirements.
I like that they process raw meat for safe shelf storage.
 
Looks like their price has come down a bit? I considered getting one a while back. What put me off (besides price, $4,500 then) was the weight, the noise and the maintenance requirements.
I like that they process raw meat for safe shelf storage.
Yeah, that's what I see as the biggest benefit. You can freeze dry raw or cooked meat and it's shelf stable and nutritious for a very long time. Using the small one, with 3 trays, I was easily able to freeze dry about 5 pounds of sirloin steak.

Filtering the oil is a pretty simple process. The noise of the oil pump is probably the worst thing. I'm not sure what the total power usage is for an entire batch, I'd have to look at it - but knowing how a freezer and pump operate + heating coils, I would guess a solid 6-7kW. So about $1.00-$1.50 in my area.
 

Tuatha de Danaan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
At this point in time I've given up on trying to make my own Ghee. All butters have too much fluid and in trying to extract said fluid I end up with basically a caramel sludge.
Has anyone tried commercially bought Ghee and what are the comparisons in the various brands.? Any ideas would be a great help.
 

Ageeva

Jedi
At this point in time I've given up on trying to make my own Ghee. All butters have too much fluid and in trying to extract said fluid I end up with basically a caramel sludge.
Has anyone tried commercially bought Ghee and what are the comparisons in the various brands.? Any ideas would be a great help.
I was just wondering Tuatha de Danaan, when you say 'caramel' do you mean the colour is more brown than bright yellow? I've made Ghee quite a few times in the past few years but after some observation I'm still getting the same reaction as I do with all milk products. I'm usually meticulous to make sure I separate the milk proteins from the fat but I'm probably getting some residue still, hence the reaction.
I did buy organic Ghee once from a health store but I found it quite expensive, it was about 11 euros for 350 gr. and it was Pukka Organic Ghee , the price put me off buying again. There may be cheaper options out there though.
 
At this point in time I've given up on trying to make my own Ghee. All butters have too much fluid and in trying to extract said fluid I end up with basically a caramel sludge.
Has anyone tried commercially bought Ghee and what are the comparisons in the various brands.? Any ideas would be a great help.

Q1: Why aren’t high fat dairy foods like cheese, double thick cream and butter included in a Pk diet? Is this based on evidence or anecdotal experience?

Nothing in PKD can be based on anecdotal experience because then it would not be scientifically sound. Due to the specific mechanism of action of the immune system, milk proteins can trigger inflammatory reactions even in the smallest amount, due to the dentritic cells. There is no dairy that is not containing milk proteins. Even ghee, contains it in small quantities.



can this be the best?


A: Frequency fence.

Q: (L) What was the event a hundred or so years after the flood of Noah that was described as the confusing of languages, or the tower of Babel?


so we can't hear each other and there are too many problems

I'm sorry that I can't explain enough and know your language.

Some of us don't even use ghee. I wanted you to know
 

Kay Kim

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Most of times, I am using small butter to fries eggs in the morning.
But now I am wondering, should I continue to use it or not. Because I just found out that dairy and things that derived from the milk products generates inflammation in person’s body. That’s means butter, cheese too.

October 24th 2009

Q: (L) So anybody else got any questions? (DD) I'd like to ask about medical attention. Should I seriously entertain going ahead with my surgical procedure on my esophagus?

A: What do you feel?

Q: (DD) Well, I feel like it's not a good thing, but I'm wondering if the diet and the meditation are enough to overcome this damage?

A: Give it six months.

Q: (DD) Okay, I can do that. Is there any nutrient that I'm seriously deficient in?

A: Not in particular. It is mostly inflammation.

Q: (DD) Inflammation of the esophageal sphincter?

A: Body.

Q: (DD) Huh. And how would one reduce the inflammation? (L) That's what the diet's for. (DD) No quick fix. (Joe) Gotta be strict, DD! No cheatin'! (L) It takes six months to really get inflammation under control. It really does. Or longer. It took longer for me. It'll probably be shorter for you. (DD) Is gluten the source of that inflammation?

A: Mainly. Also dairy.

Q: (Joe) DD, DD, DD! What have we been telling you? (DD) Does goat and sheepderived milk products constitute dairy?

A: Yes
 

Tuatha de Danaan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Most of times, I am using small butter to fries eggs in the morning.
Hi Kay Kim, I make all my own lard from suet I get from the butchers and use that for everything from frying pan to cooking in oven. I would like to have Ghee for my Gluten free bread and Gluten free crackers. That's why I ask the question on Ghee.
 

Ageeva

Jedi
Just thought I'd add my own experience with pressure Canning to this thread. When I first heard about pressure Canning about ten years ago it was something I was completely unaware of since it wasn't a tradition in my country (it still hasn't become popular) but I did want to try it. Unfortunately pressure canners were impossible to come by at the time and buying one from the US was too expensive for me then and for a while after. But eventually I bought one and started to learn how to do it. I was mostly interested in Canning meat as I could see a time when it would be banned or become too expensive (that time is getting close) so I wanted to have my own supply. There was no problem getting meat from grass fed animals, organic if I could afford it. Anyway I did all the research, bought books and watched demonstration videos as well as being meticulous with the instructions that came with my pressure canner. (I have a Presto 23 litre canner which I got through a US seller on Ebay, about 130 euros)
Yes, I was a bit nervous at first considering the pressures and the fact that I was preserving meat. But that was a good thing because it focused my mind on remembering all the necessary steps to pressure can properly. The most important thing was never to walk away from the canner as I found the pressure on the canner would fluctuate more than I expected so I had to keep an eye on it to make sure the pressure didn't drop below the 11psi mark. I've done it quite a bit since using beef, lamb and bacon and Ive only had about 2% or less failure with the seals. The failed ones of course went into the fridge after cooling and eaten within three days.
Well I'm a more relaxed 'cannerist' these days but I realised I hadn't tried the meat yet. Until today. I opened a half quart jar of beef which I canned about a year ago. Seal was good, it smelled good and nothing sinister to be seen inside, so heated it up as part of a meal today and... it was delicious! The meat was so tender.
So it worked for me. It's still such a foreign concept here that friends and work colleagues think it's a crazy thing to do and have warned me about botulism. Of course, I was super aware of the dangers of not doing it right which is why I prepared a lot before doing it.
It's been a great experience for me and I'm doing fine after my first self pressure canned meal;-D
It was this forum where I came across the concept of pressure canning first so I'm very grateful for that.
 

liam1310

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
(I have a Presto 23 litre canner which I got through a US seller on Ebay, about 130 euros)
Presto is a decent canner been using one for years now, does the Job very well. Haven't needed to change the seal on it yet after years of canning. Made to last.
The most important thing was never to walk away from the canner as I found the pressure on the canner would fluctuate more than I expected so I had to keep an eye on it to make sure the pressure didn't drop below the 11psi mark
Yeah, I have to turn the heat up and down as the pressure rises and falls to keep it between 10-11psi.
Until today. I opened a half quart jar of beef which I canned about a year ago. Seal was good, it smelled good and nothing sinister to be seen inside, so heated it up as part of a meal today and... it was delicious! The meat was so tender.

Longest for me was 15 months. It was delicious, like it was cooked that day but nicer since it was sitting in the jar that long. I prefer the tase of canned meat, over oven cooked. Especially pork
 
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