Corona craziness

mARTinSky

Jedi
FOTCM Member
Here is the BBC's advice on how to deal with Conspiracy theorists (the current one is coronavirus) during Christmas gatherings.

Is this not a clear sign that they are slowly but surely losing on some fields in this sick game? Doesn't this look like a quite desperate step from their side?

BBC is trying their best to fulfill their propaganda tool role but they are not getting exactly where they planned. Look at this example - see comments. They lost here, especially if you compare this with comments from an article published, say, 2-3 months ago. People are starting to slowly see that something is very fishy here.
 

seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Is this not a clear sign that they are slowly but surely losing on some fields in this sick game? Doesn't this look like a quite desperate step from their side?
They are losing ground. The tone of the article is interesting and looks to me as something new. The article was somewhat entertaining and will put some comments :lol:

BBC seems to be pitying the so-called conspiracy theorists ( CT's) as lost souls that need understanding. Hopefully, their experts won't recommend burning at the stake as a remedy.
As your uncle passes the roast potatoes, he casually mentions that a coronavirus vaccine will be used to inject microchips into our bodies to track us.
Or maybe it's that point when a friend, after a couple of pints, starts talking about how Covid-19 "doesn't exist". Or when pudding is ruined as a long-lost cousin starts spinning lurid tales about QAnon and elite Satanists eating babies.
So, excess drinking and the need to excuse for spoiling the pudding(or something like that) creates Conspiracy theories.
The recent rules changes have upended holiday plans for many of us, but you still may find yourself grappling with such situations over the next few days - talking not about legitimate political questions and debates, but outlandish plots and fictions.
So how do you talk to people about conspiracy theories without ruining Christmas?
Now, conspiracy theorists are responsible for spoiling Christmas. Never mind who asked to limit Christmas gatherings.

1: Keep calm​

While it's important to confront falsehoods, it's never useful if things end up in a flaming row.
"My number one rule would be to not spoil Christmas," says Mick West, author of Escaping the Rabbit Hole. "An angry, heated conversation will leave everyone feeling rubbish and further cement conspiracy beliefs."
So loving and caring BBC is? They want us to celebrate It's alright to feel angry and rubbish after hearing CT's points and it is not your fault.
Psychologist Jovan Byford, a lecturer at the Open University, notes that conspiracy theories often have a strong emotional dimension.
"They are not just about right and wrong," he says, "but underpinned by feelings of resentment, anger and indignation over how the world works."
CT's has an emotional regulation problem. Only MSM can tell how the world works. This is not about right and wrong.

sense of right and wrong - motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions. conscience, moral sense, scruples.
"It is extremely important to remain calm at all times," she says. "Whoever you're talking to is often just as passionate as you are about your own beliefs and will defend them to the grave."
And also remember - medical experts say shouting increases the chance of spreading coronavirus. Yet another reason to keep things low-key.
Here again, damn Covid and it can't allow people to shout at their own family members.

2: Don't be dismissive​

"Approach conversations with friends and family with empathy rather than ridicule," says Claire Wardle from First Draft, a not-for-profit which fights misinformation. "Listen to what they have to say with patience."
Her golden rule is: never publicly shame someone for their views. That's likely to backfire.

"If you do decide to discuss conspiracy theories, don't be dismissive of the other person's beliefs," Jovan Byford agrees. "Establish some common ground."
Remember that people often believe conspiracy theories because deep down, they're worried or anxious. Try to understand those feelings - particularly in a year like the one we've just had.
Poor CT's

3: Encourage critical thinking​

People who believe conspiracy theories often say: "I do my own research."
The problem is that their research tends to consist of watching fringe YouTube videos, following random people on Facebook, and cherry-picking evidence from biased Twitter accounts.
But the spirit of doubt that pervades the conspiracy-minded internet is actually a key opening for rational thought, says Jovan Byford.
"Many people who believe in conspiracy theories see themselves as healthy sceptics and self-taught researchers into complex issues," he says. "Present this as something that, in principle, you value and share.
"Your aim is not to make them less curious or sceptical, but to change what they are curious about, or sceptical of."
So you can't change them, so divert the attention.
That's what helped Phil from Belfast. He used to be big into 9/11 conspiracies.
"I used to point out the fact that there were various experts who doubted official stories. This was very persuasive to me," he explains. "Why would these experts lie?"
But then he began applying scepticism not to just "official sources" but also the alternative "experts" that was listening to.
He developed a deeper understanding of the scientific method and scepticism itself. Just because one expert believes something, doesn't make it true.
"You can find experts and very intelligent people who lend credence to any position," he says.
"Focus on those who are pushing these ideas, and what they might be getting," says Claire Wardle. "For instance, financial gain by selling health supplements, or reputational gain in building a following."
So as per BBC, Only MSM experts give advice for charity and good for the world, but the alternate "experts" gives the advice for financial advantage. Don't research of what they are saying instead, research on the people who are saying. Don't research on MSM experts though. We can expect some boogey-man experts to show as proof.

4: Ask questions​

Fact-checking is important, but it's often not the right approach when someone passionately believes in conspiracies. Questions are much more effective than assertions, experts say.
"Focusing on the tactics and techniques used by people pushing disinformation is a more effective way of addressing these conversations than trying to debunk the information," Claire Wardle says.
Don't bother why they are passionate. Since they are passionate, they are blind. period.
"By asking questions and getting people to realise the flaws, you ultimately get people to doubt their own confidence and open them up to hearing alternative views," says former conspiracy believer Phil.
The role of mainstream view and the alternate view is reversed here.

5: Don't expect immediate results​

You might be hoping that a constructive conversation will end with some kind of epiphany over Christmas pudding - but don't bet on it.
Don't try to research on what they are saying, because you can't change them. MSM seems to be more worried that people are get converted.
For those who have fallen deep down the conspiracy rabbit hole, getting out again can be a very long process.
This is addictive process. :lol:
"Be realistic about what you can achieve," psychologist Jovan Byford warns. "Conspiracy theories instil in believers a sense of superiority. It's an important generator of self-esteem - which will make them resistant to change."
CT's are narcissists.
For fact-checker Claire Wardle, it's not just about bruised egos. This year has been scary - and for many, conspiracy theories have been a source of comfort.

"Recognise that everyone has had their lives turned upside down, and is seeking explanations," she says.
"Conspiracy theories tend to be simple, powerful stories that explain the world. Reality is complex and messy, which is harder for our brains to process."
Only MSM can understand and convey the complex world. Don't even think about it or ask questions. Just control your family members thinking, because you care about them. Have pat on your self.
But the experts agree that even if you don't see immediate results - don't give up.
The only thing left in the article is to suggest to call some number to report about conspiracy theorists.
 

primeaddict

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
They are losing ground. The tone of the article is interesting and looks to me as something new. The article was somewhat entertaining and will put some comments :lol:

BBC seems to be pitying the so-called conspiracy theorists ( CT's) as lost souls that need understanding. Hopefully, their experts won't recommend burning at the stake as a remedy.

So, excess drinking and the need to excuse for spoiling the pudding(or something like that) creates Conspiracy theories.

Now, conspiracy theorists are responsible for spoiling Christmas. Never mind who asked to limit Christmas gatherings.

So loving and caring BBC is? They want us to celebrate It's alright to feel angry and rubbish after hearing CT's points and it is not your fault.

CT's has an emotional regulation problem. Only MSM can tell how the world works. This is not about right and wrong.

sense of right and wrong - motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions. conscience, moral sense, scruples.

Here again, damn Covid and it can't allow people to shout at their own family members.

Poor CT's

So you can't change them, so divert the attention.

So as per BBC, Only MSM experts give advice for charity and good for the world, but the alternate "experts" gives the advice for financial advantage. Don't research of what they are saying instead, research on the people who are saying. Don't research on MSM experts though. We can expect some boogey-man experts to show as proof.

Don't bother why they are passionate. Since they are passionate, they are blind. period.

The role of mainstream view and the alternate view is reversed here.

Don't try to research on what they are saying, because you can't change them. MSM seems to be more worried that people are get converted.

This is addictive process. :lol:

CT's are narcissists.

Only MSM can understand and convey the complex world. Don't even think about it or ask questions. Just control your family members thinking, because you care about them. Have pat on your self.

The only thing left in the article is to suggest to call some number to report about conspiracy theorists.

Thanks to the power of commentaries on the propagandist tweets!!!

The propagandist can not eliminate the commentaries the are reveling the lies and they are desperately trying to diminish the profound affect of a simple truth. The fact that they claim their "truth" is "complex and messy," shows that simple truths are giving them the vapors (Romantic Fiction Bleed Through).
 

Woodsman

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
They are losing ground. The tone of the article is interesting and looks to me as something new. The article was somewhat entertaining and will put some comments :lol:

BBC seems to be pitying the so-called conspiracy theorists ( CT's) as lost souls that need understanding. Hopefully, their experts won't recommend burning at the stake as a remedy.

So, excess drinking and the need to excuse for spoiling the pudding(or something like that) creates Conspiracy theories.

Now, conspiracy theorists are responsible for spoiling Christmas. Never mind who asked to limit Christmas gatherings.

So loving and caring BBC is? They want us to celebrate It's alright to feel angry and rubbish after hearing CT's points and it is not your fault.

CT's has an emotional regulation problem. Only MSM can tell how the world works. This is not about right and wrong.

sense of right and wrong - motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions. conscience, moral sense, scruples.

Here again, damn Covid and it can't allow people to shout at their own family members.

Poor CT's

So you can't change them, so divert the attention.

So as per BBC, Only MSM experts give advice for charity and good for the world, but the alternate "experts" gives the advice for financial advantage. Don't research of what they are saying instead, research on the people who are saying. Don't research on MSM experts though. We can expect some boogey-man experts to show as proof.

Don't bother why they are passionate. Since they are passionate, they are blind. period.

The role of mainstream view and the alternate view is reversed here.

Don't try to research on what they are saying, because you can't change them. MSM seems to be more worried that people are get converted.

This is addictive process. :lol:

CT's are narcissists.

Only MSM can understand and convey the complex world. Don't even think about it or ask questions. Just control your family members thinking, because you care about them. Have pat on your self.

The only thing left in the article is to suggest to call some number to report about conspiracy theorists.

You left out the best quote from the article:

"And also remember - medical experts say shouting increases the chance of spreading coronavirus. Yet another reason to keep things low-key."
:-P
 

Arwenn

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I enjoyed this satire from Babylon Bee:
Jupiter & Saturn fined for not obeying social distance rules

Astronomers at NASA have fined two planets in our solar system, Saturn and Jupiter, for callously disregarding social distancing rules as their paths cross in the night sky.

"The great conjunction of these two planets in the night sky will be a thing to behold," said NASA scientist Borg Nilsenlarg. "But we highly recommend not beholding it. The science on COVID is still being worked out and we can't predict what awful consequences may follow from these two renegade celestial travelers violating social distancing guidelines."

It is currently not quite clear how a planet can actually be fined, or how a planet can spread COVID, or how a virus can survive on a hostile planetary atmosphere, or how that affects humans on Earth. These concerns were quickly put to rest, however, after Gavin Newsome looked up from his appetizer at French Laundry to yell "SCIENCE!" in a very authoritative-sounding voice.

The U.S. Government has tasked Space Force with collecting the fine from these two planets. The mission is expected to cost 3.2 Trillion dollars, which is the equivalent of about twelve $600 stimulus checks.

😂
 

Palinurus

The Living Force
Craziness with a charitable twist: Design team creates special one-off Christmas at a Distance tablecloth for auction


Tafelkleed-2.jpg

Social distance table cloth - Image: Torben Raun - This Agency

Thursday, December 24, 2020 - 16:53
Design team creates special one-off Christmas at a Distance tablecloth for auction


This Christmas will be memorable for any number of reasons. Amsterdam-based marketing creative Ingmar Larsen teamed up with costume designer Rianne Mertens, photographer Torben Raun and designer Glenn Doherty and came up with an innovative design for a tablecloth that will ensure everyone at the dinner table celebrates the holidays safely this year.

The 22-foot-long table cloth depicts social-distancing reindeer and five spaces for table settings. The group said they came up with the number based on the maximum number of guests the Dutch government is allowing inside a couple's home for Christmas during the corona-virus lock down.

“The idea was born out of the desire to create something festive that is also relevant for the current situation. This way everyone can celebrate together without difficulty," Larsen said about the inspiration behind his work.

The tablecloth will be auctioned off via Instagram on Christmas Eve. All money collected in the auction will be donated to the Salvation Army.

Bids can be offered in the comment section and must be placed by 7 p.m. [i.e. already closed off]. The prize will be personally delivered by Ingmar himself, at the latest, by Christmas Day.

Due to the special delivery method, the tablecloth is only available in the Netherlands, he said.

Larsen won acclaim several years ago for his NoPhone, a phone-shaped slab of plastic for smartphone addicts to hold instead of a distracting illuminated screen. Doherty may be known to some in the Netherlands for collecting Amsterdam canal water in premium bottles as a gift idea.

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seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Is this not a clear sign that they are slowly but surely losing on some fields in this sick game? Doesn't this look like a quite desperate step from their side?
Here is the latest one from Channel 4. I thought British Royal family is untouchable atleast the queen, but no longer so. I don't know what type of psyop(or screwing up viewers associative thinking) this is, but surely interesting.:lol:
 
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