Death of Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh at 99 years of age.

Joe

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The fact that Snopes “debunked” it made me even more suspicious- how appropriate would it be to use Buckingham palace for a marketing stunt of this kind? IMO highly unlikely.

Well, it seems that in this case it was not only likely, but actually happened.

Prince Phillip’s uncle Mountbatten - who was assassinated by IRA was a proven pedophile and likely a psychopath too. His persona and different statements over the years dont help.

Yeah, although pedophilia in high places seems to be, and has been, very common throughout history. So one in the rather large royal family is not statistically significant. And it would seem he met a just end. Strange how such a powerful member of a supposedly awesomely powerful family supposedly at the 'top of the pyramid' could be so easily done away with by a gang of 'terrorists'.
 
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MJF

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Well, it seems that in this case it was not only likely, but actually happened.



Yeah, although pedophilia in high places seems to be, and have been, very common throughout history. So one in the rather large royal family is not statistically significant. And it would seem he met a just end. Strange how such a powerful member of a supposedly awesomely powerful family supposedly at the 'top of the pyramid' could be so easily done away with by a gang of 'terrorists'.
By some accounts, he was a pretty lousy naval commander as well. In case people are not aware, the film 'In Which We Serve' starring Sir Noel Coward is loosely based on Mountbatten and his ship HMS Kelly, which was sunk during the war with him in command. There are those who claim that his seamanship contributed to the ship's demise but I m not expert enough to know whether this is a sustainable accusation. In Which We Serve (1942) - IMDb

In contrast, his nephew, Prince Phillip (mentioned in dispatches at the Battle of Matapan), was highly thought of as a naval commander. I saw an interview with a former First Sea Lord (commander of the Royal Navy) who was at Dartmouth Naval College with Phillip as a cadet. He said that Phillip passed out of College as the top cadet in his year. This was earned on merit, not through royal patronage. He then said that he had no doubt if Phillip had stayed in the Navy he would have had his job as First Sea Lord. That is high praise indeed.
 

hally

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Not to label myself, but as an Irishman, there is something that makes this passing of Prince Phillip a welcome excuse for a shindig!!!! With all respect of course.
Now, saying that...... Knowing that we have been lied too and manipulated into different factions of hate squads, ( Catholic, Protestant, Man utd, Liverpool fc., Irish, English etc, etc), it doesn't take much to push it over the edge...
But, this just feeds the same beast!!!
Laura's right, it's too quick and easy to judge and persecute without looking in the way to yourself and objective reality for understanding. Lessons all-round....
 

MJF

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I actually think that the "Glorious Revolution" was the interruption of royal bloodlines the Cs mentioned.

If there is no thread entitled "Alton Towers", create one.
I have now created a thread for Alton Towers and Sir Francis Bacon within the main History Thread under Alton Towers, Sir Francis Bacon and the Rosicrucians

Spoiler alert - I think the link to Alton Towers is really a link to a specific family who played a major part in some of the most historic events in England in the 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries.
 

MJF

Jedi Master
In this thread there have been a few less than complimentary remarks made about Prince Charles, the Queen's eldest child. I have never met him but two people I am close to have. I thought I would therefore share with the Forum their experiences with the man, which show him in two different lights and reveal that, like most of us, he is a complex individual with both good and bad aspects to his character.​

The first case is that of an Australian friend of mine who is based in England and who owned a property in Poundbury, a new model town established by Prince Charles as a pet project of his. See Poundbury, Dorset - official guide to visiting, living or working in Poundbury

My friend is a retired City lawyer who worked for one of the most prestigious law firms in the world. His brother was the commander of the Australian Navy. Hence, he very much comes from an establishment family. He met with Prince Charles during a committee meeting of the overseeing body for Poundbury. There was a bottle of scotch whisky on the table in front of the prince. During the meeting, the prince kept pouring himself a drink from the bottle. After a while, it was clear that the whisky was taking its toll on him. Hence, my friend reached forward as the prince was about to take yet another drink and snatched the bottle away from him saying: "Your Highness, I think you may have had enough". The prince was quite indignant but carried on. After the meeting had finished, the prince's equerry came up to my friend and said: "Thank you sir, you did the right thing". Sadly, what this demonstrates is that Prince Charles, like most of us, has his own inner demons to fight. Despite his title and wealth, he is a vulnerable human being just like all of us here on the big blue marble.

The second story concerns my cousin who met with the prince at his home at Highgrove House. Highgrove House - Wikipedia

In April 2015, the prince went to Gallipoli in Turkey to participate in the commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Gallipoli Campaign in the Dardanelles. Gallipoli campaign - Wikipedia.

The President of France and the Prime Ministers of Britain, Australia and New Zealand all attended this event, which was presided over by President Erdogan of Turkey. Prince Charles represented the Queen. He attended the main commemoration for the British, Australians and New Zealanders at the Commonwealth War Memorial, which overlooks Cape Helles, where the initial landings took place. Please note that for the British the campaign was nothing short of a disaster (as regards the landings, think of the opening scenes in Saving Private Ryan or the Mel Gibson fim Gallipoli and you will get the picture) but for the Australians and New Zealanders who came to the event it was a major remembrance of where their nations came of age.

The main event was an all ticket affair and security was very tight. I went to the event with my uncle, whose father was one of those who had landed that first morning (he was a soldier in the Irish regiment, the Royal Munster Fusiliers, and his battalion was annihilated that first day) and his son, my cousin. Unfortunately, due to a mix up by the British Gallipoli Association we were not given tickets so could not attend the main commemoration but went instead the next day (the actual day of the landing) to the beach at Cape Helles in order to plant the flag of the Munsters and remember the fallen. There were a few fellow Britons there as well and we spoke to them. One was a retired RAF Wing Commander who had driven all the way from England to be there. He had promised to do it with his son but his son had died the year before from cancer. However, he still felt honour bound to keep his promise to his son and hence drove all the way on his own. His great uncle had been in the Royal Artilley and had landed at the beach.

My cousin subsequently met with Prince Charles at Highgrove and raised the matter with him. When he learned that my uncle was not able to attend the main commemoration he got quite angry. He said that he had met lots of grandchildren of the Gallipoli combatants but none of their children. He said he would have loved to have met with my uncle to discuss his father's first hand accounts of the landings with him. He also wondered out loud why the Turks had not held the commemoration on the actual anniversary of the landings but on the day before instead but he was pleased to learn that we had marked the day on the beach. He then discovered that my cousin was an enthusiastic lover of all things byzantine and of Greek antiquities. This is something dear to the prince's soul, as he has spent much time in Greece and particularly likes visiting Mount Athos, the famous Greek Monastic centre, for its spirituality. He also has a great appreciation for Greek Orthodox art and religious icons. One should remember that his father, Prince Phillip, grew up in Greece and the prince's grandmother became an Orthodox nun. At this, he took my cousin on a personal guided tour of his private chapel at Highgrove, which is decorated and adorned as a Greek Orthodox chapel rather than as an Anglican one.

The point of the story is that the prince, a busy man, did not have to do this for my cousin, an ordinary commoner, but he deliberately took time out to do so because my cousin shared a common interest and appreciation of his. Hence, if he may sometimes come over as aloof and a bit stiff and aristocratic on television, underneath it all he is a real human being who, just like us, has his good points and his bad points.

 

Ageeva

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It's been an interesting thread and another important reminder to not jump to unsubstantiated conclusions about those we know little of or making assumptions about how much influence or participation in the nefarious goings-on in the world Royal families have.
I do have a lot of sympathy for the Queen on the death of her steadfast support and companion of more than 70 years, Prince Philip. From an Irish perspective, considering the painful history between Britain and Ireland going back a very long way, the visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in 2011 made a significant contribution, in as much as was possible in their capacity, to healing old wounds. It was the first visit of a British Monarch to this part of Ireland since Queen Victoria in 1900. It was said that Elizabeth and Philip had wanted for a long time to visit but recent conflict and security issues had prevented it from happening. She needn't have worried because many of the Irish are avid Royal watchers and far more, than were allowed, wanted to see her. (I should know. While nervously waiting in a waiting room for a dental appointment as an 11-year-old my mother was more concerned inquiring whether the TV could be switched on so she could watch Charles and Diana's wedding! :-D ) When she did arrive she made a speech in Dublin Castle which I would regard as one of her finest. While the speech may have been written by someone else I've no doubt it reflected her and Philip's true feelings. An extract:

"Madam President, speaking here in Dublin Castle it is impossible to ignore the weight of history, as it was yesterday when you and I laid wreaths at the Garden of Remembrance.

Indeed, so much of this visit reminds us of the complexity of our history, its many layers and traditions, but also the importance of forbearance and conciliation. Of being able to bow to the past, but not be bound by it.

Of course, the relationship has not always been straightforward; nor has the record over the centuries been entirely benign. It is a sad and regrettable reality that through history our islands have experienced more than their fair share of heartache, turbulence and loss.

These events have touched us all, many of us personally, and are a painful legacy. We can never forget those who have died or been injured, and their families. To all those who have suffered as a consequence of our troubled past I extend my sincere thoughts and deep sympathy. With the benefit of historical hindsight we can all see things which we would wish had been done differently or not at all. But it is also true that no-one who looked to the future over the past centuries could have imagined the strength of the bonds that are now in place between the governments and the people of our two nations, the spirit of partnership that we now enjoy, and the lasting rapport between us. No-one here this evening could doubt that heartfelt desire of our two nations
."

And a memorable photograph of her and Prince Philip's visit to the English Market in Cork City. On meeting the Queen and Philip, Pat O'Connell, a fishmonger there, joked to the Queen that, 'I haven't been this nervous since I married my wife thirty years ago!"
Queen and Prince Philip at English Market 2011 2.jpg
Philip is in the background. Pat had this to say on hearing of Prince Philip's death:
“They were very ordinary people the two of them, the Queen and himself. I suppose you have perceptions of these people and the life they live and you kind of expect them to be something totally different from what they are in reality - they were like any other couple at the counter,” he said.

"We had a great laugh that time. He was a lovely man. It’s so sad to hear the news today."
 

gottathink

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In this thread there have been a few less than complimentary remarks made about Prince Charles, the Queen's eldest child. I have never met him but two people I am close to have. I thought I would therefore share with the Forum their experiences with the man, which show him in two different lights and reveal that, like most of us, he is a complex individual with both good and bad aspects to his character.
Thank you MJF
Those are very interesting stories and you illustrate your thesis very well.
We often expect other people to be ideal whilst allowing ourselves less than ideal behaviour that perhaps we think no one cares or notices.
 

Scottie

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Thank you MJF
Those are very interesting stories and you illustrate your thesis very well.
We often expect other people to be ideal whilst allowing ourselves less than ideal behaviour that perhaps we think no one cares or notices.

Indeed. We like to rush to the conclusion that people are psychopaths. Assuming that 6% of the population are actual psychos, we have a 94% chance of getting it wrong. Even those who are ponerized are technically still 'souls in struggle' to one degree or another.

Even after all the cards are down, it's still not wise to assume that we know a person. Life consists of many rounds of cards, not just a single hand.

Sometimes I think we cling to how someone else was (or is sometimes), not how they are now. In that case, it's our own emotional nonsense that gets in the way of things. It's also not observing and accepting what is, which as we know is a very bad idea in general.
 

MJF

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Indeed. We like to rush to the conclusion that people are psychopaths. Assuming that 6% of the population are actual psychos, we have a 94% chance of getting it wrong. Even those who are ponerized are technically still 'souls in struggle' to one degree or another.

Even after all the cards are down, it's still not wise to assume that we know a person. Life consists of many rounds of cards, not just a single hand.

Sometimes I think we cling to how someone else was (or is sometimes), not how they are now. In that case, it's our own emotional nonsense that gets in the way of things. It's also not observing and accepting what is, which as we know is a very bad idea in general.
Scottie, I agree with you. I saw pictures of Prince Charles yesterday visiting with Camilla the flowers of remembrance that have been left by people to honour his father. He was fighting to hold back the tears and not very successfully. I don't think a genuine psychopath could put on such a good act. I married a low grade psychpath and when I attended my mother in law's funeral I was astounded that she did not shed one tear for her mother.
 

Pashalis

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I married a low grade psychpath and when I attended my mother in law's funeral I was astounded that she did not shed one tear for her mother.

I think there are a lot of possible reasons why somebody wouldn’t cry on a funeral and many of those reasons have nothing to do with the person being a Psychopath or anything remotely like that. Just want to point that out in case anyone reading the above is coming away with the idea that something like not crying in a funeral is a reliable way to „detect“ a Psychopath.
 

Laura

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I think there are a lot of possible reasons why somebody wouldn’t cry on a funeral and many of those reasons have nothing to do with the person being a Psychopath or anything remotely like that. Just want to point that out in case anyone reading the above is coming away with the idea that something like not crying in a funeral is a reliable way to „detect“ a Psychopath.

Not only that, but psychopaths can turn on the alligator tears when they want to, completely deceiving their audience.
 

Charade

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My family come from Ireland, so it is like a second home to me. Like you, I visited Blarney Castle but didn't kiss the Blarney Stone. I guess it was because my little Irish granny from Cork always said I didn't need to kiss the stone as I was full of blarney already. I have never visited Newgrange though. In some ways it is like the Irish Stonehenge and we haven't yet unlocked all its mysteries.
Here is a webpage for Leeds Castle, which is really one of the most attractive castles in England. Well worth a visit and not far from London.
The castle is gorgeous! I could spend hours reading through the website but there is so much to catch up on here. I love that it offers beautiful visuals to play with in my mind while I am reading the regency romance era novels. It brings home the magnificence of castles and the life there would be a surreal experience.
 

MJF

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I think there are a lot of possible reasons why somebody wouldn’t cry on a funeral and many of those reasons have nothing to do with the person being a Psychopath or anything remotely like that. Just want to point that out in case anyone reading the above is coming away with the idea that something like not crying in a funeral is a reliable way to „detect“ a Psychopath.
Yes, that's a fair comment to make where you don't know the circumstances. However, in my case, the deduction that my ex-wife was a psychopath was based over a long period of time observing her in action and was made long before her mother's funeral took place.

As Laura points out with psychopaths, my ex-wife was a consummate actress and could turn on the tears when and if she needed to and she is very manipulative by nature. Her mother did an awful lot for her over the years and yet she seemed completely unmoved at her mother's passing. It just struck me as very odd behaviour since your mother is generally the closest person to you on this earth other than a spouse. I had a good relationship with my mother-in-law and I still have a very good relationship with my father-in-law. He told me not long ago that he knew that his daughter bad mouthed both him and her mother to other people. He said he didn't know why this was but, if he had one regret, that was that he thought he and his wife had spoiled her too much. She was an only child. He still does a considerable amount for her to this day at the age of 91 and gets no real thanks for it. It upsets me to see the way she treats him at times. He has been an excellent grandfather to my children and, since I no longer live locally, I have had to rely on him to help them out when needed.

Could Prince Charles have been faking it? Yes, that's always a possibility but it looked real to me. I know when my father died I was a wreck for a good period of time afterwards and struggled to get through the day of the funeral. You just put on a stiff upper lip and try and get through it as fast as you can so you can return to grieving in private.
 

MJF

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B
The castle is gorgeous! I could spend hours reading through the website but there is so much to catch up on here. I love that it offers beautiful visuals to play with in my mind while I am reading the regency romance era novels. It brings home the magnificence of castles and the life there would be a surreal experience.
Be careful though as it comes with resident ghosts.
 
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