Dyatlov Pass incident

Laura

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Vulcan59 said:
Some answers to the enigmatic Dyatlov incident. Session 27 February 2016 :)
Those are certainly not the answers I expected. But then, after I thought about it, I realized "what else could explain the extreme messiness of the affair?"
 

Elohir

Jedi
I didn't expect such an awser too even if it's only semi-surprising. All the mess and the fireballs seen close to the location make us think about transdimensional portals.
But some plant based beings playing with a technology they don't master, well I'd say it's something new !

Anyway, when I think about the hikers... seriously... what a bad luck, isn't it ? Imagine what's happened to them by accident... "Oups, sorry, our bad !"
Not the right time, nor the right place...

Thank you for having asked the question.
 

Pashalis

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Elohir said:
Anyway, when I think about the hikers... seriously... what a bad luck, isn't it ? Imagine what's happened to them by accident... "Oups, sorry, our bad !"
Not the right time, nor the right place...
Well if it is true that the hikers were seriously warned by the local tribe to not go to that place (since they apparently knew what a dangerous and strange place that is) and then went there anyway, they sort of invited the disaster themselfs..
 

Laura

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Pashalis said:
Elohir said:
Anyway, when I think about the hikers... seriously... what a bad luck, isn't it ? Imagine what's happened to them by accident... "Oups, sorry, our bad !"
Not the right time, nor the right place...
Well if it is true that the hikers were seriously warned by the local tribe to not go to that place (since they apparently knew what a dangerous and strange place that is) and then went there anyway, they sort of invited the disaster themselfs..
Well, that's in the line of blaming the victim. Obviously, if we all listened to superstition and terrified peasants, there would be no progress in this world. I'm reminded of the mapping expedition sent out in France in the 17 century, I believe. Superstitious villagers hacked one of the mappers to death because they were convinced his mapping instruments were "of the devil".
 

Pashalis

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Laura said:
Pashalis said:
Elohir said:
Anyway, when I think about the hikers... seriously... what a bad luck, isn't it ? Imagine what's happened to them by accident... "Oups, sorry, our bad !"
Not the right time, nor the right place...
Well if it is true that the hikers were seriously warned by the local tribe to not go to that place (since they apparently knew what a dangerous and strange place that is) and then went there anyway, they sort of invited the disaster themselves..
Well, that's in the line of blaming the victim. Obviously, if we all listened to superstition and terrified peasants, there would be no progress in this world. I'm reminded of the mapping expedition sent out in France in the 17 century, I believe. Superstitious villagers hacked one of the mappers to death because they were convinced his mapping instruments were "of the devil".
Yes but since a local native tribe is usually quite familiar with the area, I would at least think twice, if it is such a good idea to go to the "mountain of the dead", when they explicitly warn you to not go there (assuming that that actually happened as described in the documentary).

A few years ago, I probably would not have listened to something like that as well, but after all I've read and seen so far, it seems like when native tribes describe places and areas that are dangerous or of "the devil", that at least in some instances there is something real behind it, that you should approach carefully.

It seems like when places are named "devil" or "dead", in some instances there seems to be a reason for it, like a place where it is easier to access other dimensions/strangeness.


Keit said:
Z said:
Question for Russian speakers - does Diatlov Pass means something? Woodpecker's Pass? Or something more diabolical?
Nothing diabolical. It is a surname of the disappeared group's leader. Igor Dyatlov. It was renamed after their deaths. But indeed before the local gave it a more sinister name: a mountain of dead, or a mountain of nine dead, because there were several accidents that involved deaths of nine people.

But it guess it is certainly true that I can't impose/expect my current view on the hikers back then. They were likely not aware that the mountain is named the "mountain of the dead" by the locals either. So me blaming them is over the top indeed...
 

Laura

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Pashalis said:
Yes but since a local native tribe is usually quite familiar with the area, I would at least think twice, if it is such a good idea to go to the "mountain of the dead", when they explicitly warn you to not go there (assuming that that actually happened as described in the documentary).

A few years ago, I probably would not have listened to something like that as well, but after all I've read and seen so far, it seems like when native tribes describe places and areas that are dangerous or of "the devil", that at least in some instances there is something real behind it, that you should approach carefully.

It seems like when places are named "devil" or "dead", in some instances there seems to be a reason for it, like a place where it is easier to access other dimensions/strangeness.

<snip>


But it guess it is certainly true that I can't impose/expect my current view on the hikers back then. They were likely not aware that the mountain is named the "mountain of the dead" by the locals either. So me blaming them is over the top indeed...
Yes, all the above is useful to consider. Finding out from locals about a specific area isn't a bad idea either.

But we all know how young people can feel indestructible and "that doesn't apply to ME". What ended up happening, though, was so insanely bizarre that it can truthfully be said to be one of the strangest cases on record.
 

Elohir

Jedi
In fact, I think you're both right...

In one hand, we all should consider twice the myths and legends told by local people before going somewhere apparently very dangerous. As we use to say "you never know".

In another hand, If you don't do nothing because you listen to all myths and local legends, you can fall into easy fear and never make some interesting/important discover or simply experiment things.

So, depending the context, it could be smart and safer to listen and read about the local stories, ask some questions, look for some informations and of course use your own feelings/instinct to make your decision. Each case is different so should be your decision to go or not in an area that seems dangerous.

In this case, hard to say since it's quite normal and obvious that this kind of pass can be very dangerous according to the climate and global environment. Trained people like these hikers certainely thought they were technically and physically strong good enough to do it. Besides, do we know if the legend about the local deaths were due to the same thing (transdimensional portal by amateurs) ?

C's told us it was an accident caused by alien amateurs, maybe old deaths were just caused by natural events. In this case, it can be normal for trained hikers with good skills to test this challenge saying as Laura said "that doesn't apply to ME".

FWIW
 

Corvus

Jedi Council Member
C's told us it was an accident caused by alien amateurs, maybe old deaths were just caused by natural events. In this case, it can be normal for trained hikers with good skills to test this challenge saying as Laura said "that doesn't apply to ME".
Good point
 

Laura

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A new item on this topic:
Dyatlov pass mystery victims could have been on KGB mission — researcher

YEKATERINBURG, July 21. /TASS/. Hikers in the 1959 Igor Dyatlov expedition, who mysteriously died in the Ural Mountains could have been on a KGB mission, Head of the Dyatlov Group Memory Public Fund Yuri Kuntsevich told TASS on Thursday. ...

"It turned out that there were two KGB officers in the Dyatlov group. Quite possibly, they were carrying out a mission to provide support for a technology-induced experiment. The tourists were carrying a large batch of photo equipment, which was completely atypical of highly complex expeditions that require maximally alleviating their load," Kuntsevich said.

According to the researcher, the tourist group was tasked with reaching Otorten Mountain - translated as the Mountain of the Dead from the local Mansi language - at a definite time. With this in mind, the Dyatlov hikers specifically started the climb after the lunch, stowing away food and setting off light-handed.

"Most likely, the tourists reached their intended destination and waited for a technology-induced moment, which they were apparently expected to capture with photos. But it went off in an unplanned and extraordinary way, which was possibly the cause for the death of the group’s members. They, of course, courageously held on to the last and didn’t run away or panic," the researcher said.

In the researcher’s opinion, the version of the group’s having ties with the KGB is also supported by the fact that only four of the ten rolls of film from all the cameras have remained and it is unknown what happened to the rest.

"One film captures the trace of a technology-induced phenomenon - a glowing ball. Besides, each member of the Dyatlov group kept a diary but only three or four of them have survived. All these factors confirm ties with the KGB: they were not simply hikers: they had been sent to the mountain pass on a special mission. This can be confirmed by authorized ID held by the group’s head," Kuntsevich said.
Could be. Could also be cover-up. Or just simply the "materialist explanation" of an independent group of researchers who can't tolerate paranormal phenomena.

I mean, really! "A technology induced moment"??!!!
 

Elohir

Jedi
Thank you Laura for this new and interesting information.
Indeed, it's hard to know if it's true but at least we cannot say it doesn't have any sense.

Moreover, I would say that it could be explain why they decided to pass thtough this dangerous area just for sport.
 

sToRmR1dR

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Expedition finds another place where Dyatlov Group bodies could be

http://tass.ru/en/science/893960

Researchers plan to study the area with metal detectors

YEKATERINBURG, August 12. /TASS/. During a new expedition to the Dyatlov Pass in the Northern Urals, searchers found another location, where bodies of the Dyatlov Group, which got missing back in 1959, could be, head of the Dyatlov Group Memory Public Fund Yuri Kuntsevich told TASS on Friday.

"One of our participants in the expedition, as he was taking a picture of the place, where according to documents were bodies of the Group, noticed the place did not match the earlier pictures," he said. "For example, the tree we see in the pictures is not there. We have found another place, which resembles more the well-known descriptions, and there is the very pine tree that we see in the pictures - now it is lying on the ground, all covered with moss."

The searchers plan to study the area with metal detectors. "My opinion, this area will bring more to the research," he said. "We should use metal detectors to check this area, at least around this tree. I would not rule out the coordinates of the bodies, which are in the case, are not correct."

He continued, saying during the expedition the searchers found an earlier secret aerodrome not far from the place, where the Dyatlov Group died. "It is unrelated to the incident. We also took tests of the soil to be used in further work on a tourist route to the pass," he said. "It would be good, if this territory is improved, as now nothing is organized there, though tourists from many countries are visiting those areas."

The expedition, which began on August 1, featured 14 people from Moscow, Yekaterinburg, Chelyabinsk, Ozersk, Snezhinsk, Ufa, Lesnoye, and Samara. Among participants there are biologists, fishers, hunters, loggers and even school pupils.

Dyatlov Pass today

The Dyatlov Pass is still an attraction for tourists and researchers from all over the world. Risking their lives, people again and again are trying to solve the Dyatlov Group "mystery" or to try their abilities. Every year, rescuers have to search for tourists who lose the route or to evacuate those unable to finish a trip. For example, a woman from the Urals’ Yekaterinburg began a solo journey in June, but later on communication with her was lost. Rescuers headed to help her out, but it turned out she did not require any assistance - she had written a wrong return date.

In June also, a man from Chelyabinsk got injured as he rode an ATV in the Dyatlov Pass area. A Mi-8 helicopter took off to pick him up, but could not land in the mountains, and the injured was taken aboard on hard stretchers by winches. In February, 2016, rescuers found at the pass body of a man who tried to get on his own to a Buddhist monastery.

A month earlier, on January 13, people found at the Dyatlov Pass body of a 47 year-old man from Chelyabinsk, who came from Kazakhstan. A source at the local emergency services told TASS the man had lived on his own for a long time near the Dyatlov Pass.

Dyatlov Group mystery

The mountain pass was named after Dyatlov, the head of the expedition, which planned to ascend to the 1,079-meter summit in the Sub-Arctic Urals. Dyatlov and the other eight members of his group died at the pass near Otorten Mountain during the early morning hours of February 2, 1959 under mysterious circumstances. The expedition members were found frozen to death with numerous signs of bodily injuries and without outdoor clothes or footwear. Eventually, dozens of versions arose as to what happened at the mountain pass, including completely bizarre theories of an attack by an abominable snowman or an encounter with aliens.

According to the official forensic study, most of the hikers froze to death but some were found with serious injuries that caused their death. Various versions of the incident were considered, including an avalanche hitting their tent, an attack by fugitive prisoners, their deaths from an attack by the indigenous Mansi inhabitants or even a brawl among the group members.

A memorial plaque was inaugurated on July 19 in Solikamsk, in the Ural’s Perm Region, dedicated to Yuri Yudin, the expedition’s tenth member who had survived. During the hiking, he had to leave the group after an acute pain in his leg, which helped make him the solely surviving member of the Dyatlov group. He was the first to identify the personal belongings of the dead expedition members. Up until his last days, he maintained close contacts with the researchers investigating the causes of the Dyatlov group’s deaths.

The Dyatlov Group Memory Fund has been in existence since July 2000. The Fund has been carrying out its own investigation over all these years into the causes of the Dyatlov group’s deaths, constantly replenishing its archive with new first-hand data from friends, searching participants and other eye-witnesses who have kept silent for many years.
 

Eol

Jedi

https://youtu.be/2XNxEMXok-0

Satellite images of the oldest geoglyph in the Sverdlovsk region were found.


The most interesting thing is that this striking monument of the Neolithic era (I think this is close to the truth) has not previously been found by anyone. It is located just 60 kilometers to the south-east of the infamous Diatlov Pass.

The length of the artifact is about 10 kilometers, the width is about 5 kilometers. All the drawings (and there are dozens of them) are stamped in the ground, among the taiga. They have nothing to do with geology or logging. Ancient artists painted something that now can be interpreted in two ways. However, they resemble what looks like a comet or a meteorite. There are several dozens of them. A big bird, or something that looks like it might look like it. Two mountains between which there is something that resembles a gate (!). Maybe this passage is somewhere ... But I'm not saying anything. Since we will never know what was recorded in these figures. Made by the hands of the ancient people, which has long gone down in history. However, this now proves that the area around the Djatlov Pass was indeed sacred to the Mansi people inhabiting these places. And she became sacred long before, as there was the first inhabitant. So, there is something mystical about this.[...]
- (via google translate)

https://cont.ws/@valentindeg/736326
 

Voyageur

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Eol said:

https://youtu.be/2XNxEMXok-0

Satellite images of the oldest geoglyph in the Sverdlovsk region were found.


The most interesting thing is that this striking monument of the Neolithic era (I think this is close to the truth) has not previously been found by anyone. It is located just 60 kilometers to the south-east of the infamous Diatlov Pass.

The length of the artifact is about 10 kilometers, the width is about 5 kilometers. All the drawings (and there are dozens of them) are stamped in the ground, among the taiga. They have nothing to do with geology or logging. Ancient artists painted something that now can be interpreted in two ways. However, they resemble what looks like a comet or a meteorite. There are several dozens of them. A big bird, or something that looks like it might look like it. Two mountains between which there is something that resembles a gate (!). Maybe this passage is somewhere ... But I'm not saying anything. Since we will never know what was recorded in these figures. Made by the hands of the ancient people, which has long gone down in history. However, this now proves that the area around the Djatlov Pass was indeed sacred to the Mansi people inhabiting these places. And she became sacred long before, as there was the first inhabitant. So, there is something mystical about this.[...]
- (via google translate)

https://cont.ws/@valentindeg/736326
I had a hard time trying to envision the landscape in the way described. To me it looked like a series of forest cut-blocks and skidding corridors into the merchantable parts of the forest (saw logs). Each separate area seems to be connected with a road grid system.
 
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