Iodine and Potassium Iodide

Hi all,

I have a question re the uptake of iodine. My thyroid is gone from an operation. I am taking thyroxine (hormone replacement therapy) - does anyone know if this is all that is required to uptake iodine?

To be more clear - if one doesn't have a thyroid, what sort of things should be looked for, or remedies applied to offset potential problems stemming from the loss of this gland?

Thanks for any thoughts
 

Breo

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Hi Ilovejoghurt,

There is an article about "Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid" posted by Psyche here that discusses the iodine-thyroid relation in the Autoimmune Thyroid thread, which might give some answers to your question. Also scroll above to read "Which thyroid hormone is right for you?" and "Unraveling thyroid antibody tests".
 

Gaby

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Nora Gedgaudas discusses the importance of iodine in Primal Body, Primal Mind:

Iodine deficiency is a broadly rampant issue and one that can impact every aspect of endocrine, cognitive, mood, and immune functions. It is easily the most underrecognized and widely impacting trace mineral deficiency problem today, an issue recently brought to light by two independent medical doctors: Guy Abraham and David Brownstein.

Although iodine deficiency isn't one of the first things that comes to mind for most people in cases of learning disabilities or mood and cognitive dysfunction, this mineral is so widely deficient (and so widely misunderstood) in the American population that it likely impacts most known health problems today and cannot be ignored as a timely and critical issue.

The thyroid hormones T3 and T4 are made up of the amino acid L-tyrosine combined with either three or four molecules of iodine. respectively. Thyroid problems are growing widely and can lead to all manner of brain dysregulation and learning, memory, and mood disorders. Care must be taken, however, to rule out autoimmune thyroid issues, (e.g., Hashimoto's disease) prior to iodine supplementation. Cases of Hashimoto's disease need to be clearly identified and addressed more cautiously. Iodine is a major cofactor in the production of thyroid peroxidase: this is the very substance that a person with autoimmune thyroid problems is producing antibodies against (thyroid peroxidase antibodies), and its production will subsequently serve to accelerate destruction of the thyroid. Not good. There is currently some controversy and mixed information over this, but unfortunately the literature is quite clear with respec: to the problematic nature of iodine supplementation for individuals hav¬ing Hashimoto's disease. The risk of significantly accelerating the onset of a thyroid immune attack and often also inducing thyroid hyperactivity symptoms is very real. Even when iodine deficiency is suspected in auto-immune thyroid disorders, the problems and risks associated with iodine supplementation likely outweigh any potential benefits. Unfortunately, it these populations, adding supplemental iodine is simply not a good idea. Small amounts of naturally occurring iodine in seafood are likely okay.

Iodine requires cofactors and selenium, factors such as B-complex and C-complex vitamins, magnesium, E-complex vitamins and selenium, broad-spectrum trace elements (using something like Celtic sea salt), and essential fatty acids \in order to be properly absorbed into the tissues and properly used. It is important that tissue levels of these nutrient cofactors be healthy prior to iodine supplementation in individuals with no nonautoimmune (non Hashimoto's) thyroid disease. Failure to ensure this may result in uncom¬fortable reactions.

Although iodine is commonly recognized as needed for healthy thy¬roid functioning, many people are not aware that iodine is greatly needed for the normal functioning of each and every cell as well as the normal manufacturing of all hormones and the functioning of the entire endo-crine system (also for improving the sensitivity of hormone receptors), broadly impacting many aspects of health. Every organ and all tissues contain and must have iodine. The brain is no exception.

The therapeutic actions of iodine include antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic, and anticancer effects, elevating pH values, and serving as a mucolytic agent (breaking up mucus in the body). Conditions that can be successfully improved or treated with iodine are:

• ADD/ADHD
• atherosclerosis
• brain fog
,• breast diseases
• deafness
Dupuytren's contracture
excess mucus production
• fatigue
• fibrocystic breasts
• goiter
• headaches and migraines
• hemorrhoids
hypertension
infections
• keloids
• liver diseases
• memory problems
• ovarian disease
• parotid duct stones
• Peyronie s disease prostate disorders
• sebaceous cysts
• senility
• thyroid disorders
• vaginal infections

Apart from iodine-poor soils and reduced iodine in the food supply, one major reason for rampant iodine deficiencies involves toxic levels of other halogens in our environment and our water and food supplies. First on the list of offenders are bromine/bromide, included in all baked goods (as an anticaking agent), soft drinks, sports drinks, medications, and highly processed vegetable oils; in many pools and spas as a disinfectant; in mos; household items (including flame retardants in everything from carpets and furniture and car upholstery to electronics); and in pesticides. Bromide/bromine toxicity is everywhere and affects nearly everyone. Fluoride in municipal water supplies is also a major problem, as is chlorination. All these substances serve to displace iodine in the body and all its tissues, are markedly toxic, and often require large doses of iodine to reverse the problem.

Taking excessive amounts of iodine (or too much too quickly) can lead to uncomfortable detox symptoms (sometimes referred to as Herxheimer reactions) as these halogens are displaced. Therefore, it is important approach iodine supplementation carefully, knowledgeably, and systematically, preferably under the guidance of a knowledgeable health care practitioner. Iodine's cofactors (previously listed) are essential to succesful iodine supplementation.

Good dietary sources of iodine include all seafood, kelp, and other seaweeds. Iodized salt supplies only iodide and is not sufficient to supply all tissues with needed complete iodine. Only about 10 percent of this form of iodine in iodized salt is actually bioavailable. Unrefined, full-spectrum sea salt that is not iodized is a fairly poor source of iodine, incidentally, though though it is very helpful with the body's use of iodine. Among the best supplemental sources of higher-potency iodine are (Iodoral (combines elemental iodine and iodide, the two forms needed by the body) and Lugol's solution (mostly available by prescription and tastes awful). Kelp supplements can provide smaller amounts of naturally occurring complete iodine that are well tolerated and easily absorbed, though may be inadequate to reverse severe deficiency states or bromide/bromine or fluoride and chlorine toxicity. Detoxification of undesirable halogens (a.:- other compounds and heavy metals) for those with autoimmune issues may be more safely accomplished with the use of sodium modified citrus pectin as gentle oral chelating agents.

It can take three to six months of diligent iodine supplementation to reach full iodine sufficiency throughout the body (longer in people who have more-severe health challenges), according to Brownstein, and maintenance levels of iodine supplementation may be required for many people.
Regarding the use of iodine and its contraindication in Hashimoto's disease, Jeffrey Dach reports that the use of selenium for a period of time might reverse the dangerous side effects of iodine:

http://jeffreydach.com/2011/04/06/iodine-is-safe-and-effective-by-jeffrey-dach-md.aspx

Iodine is Safe and Effective

[...]

As you know, the problem with Iodoral (iodine) relates to the patient with Hashimoto's thyroiditis with elevated TPO and/or thyroglobulin antibodies. These patients may go into Hashitoxicosis after supplementing with iodine, exhibiting hyperthyroid symptoms possibly requiring hospitalization for thyroid storm.

We are finding Hashimoto's thyroiditis to be more common than originally thought, almost epidemic, and it seems to be increasing. On a routine basis, initial evaluation includes thyroid antibody levels. In addition, all patients routinely must have a serum selenium level drawn. I have found that in almost all patients with elevated antibodies, selenium supplementation will normalize and drive down antibody levels on serial lab studies.

In order to prevent the thyroid storm and other adverse effects from iodine in Hashimoto's patients, as you know, these patients must be supplemented with selenium first. This is why we first routinely draw a serum selenium, and for those cases below 135 ng/ml, we give 200-400 meg of selenomethionune for three weeks before starting the iodine supplementation at 6.25 mg (half the 12.5 mg tab) every other day.

Starting with a lower dose of iodine avoids the various adverse effects of skin itching and metallic taste and GI symptoms that can be reported at first. These are usually transient, and after a week or so, the dose can be safely increased to a full tablet daily.

Occasionally, we see a typical Hashimoto's patient with an elevated TSH around 5 or 6, and also an upper range free T3 around 350 to 400. These patients respond to selenium supplementation well, and follow-up labs usually show free T3 coming down to the 280-300 level, which in retrospect indicates the patient initially exhibited a slight thyrotoxic effect of the Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which then cooled down after the selenium. At this point it is safe to start the iodoral. If a Hashi's patient with a slightly overfunctioning thyroid and coexisting low selenium level is then started on iodine without first optimizing the selenium level, this will aggravate the thyroiditis, and possibly throw the patient into thyroid storm.

[...]
 

Don Genaro

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Hi Psyche,

I just read this chapter last night and looking through this thread I've decided that this might be a good supplement to be taking, particularly as I'm currently having 5 amalgam fillings removed the "poor man's" way! (although they are using a rubber dam to prevent me from swallowing bits as well as a mask to prevent inhalation. I've also took bentonite clay on the day and just after the procedure as well as chlorella, vitamin C and plenty of protective fats. I just wanted to ask if you could recommend a dosage- from what I can see, 12.5mg is a standard daily dose. Maybe I should take double dosage around the time of filling removal? Also, is there anything I should ask for specifically in the pharmacy? Anything I need to tell them I don't want? I get the feeling I'll draw blank stares if I ask for lugol solution or iodal although you never know, I might be lucky!!!
On second thoughts, I might not be lucky- just before posting this I decided to ring a pharmacy and although I didn't get blank stares it was probably only ecause I couldn't see their faces! It certainly sounded like a "strange request" to them. They'd never heard of iodal or lugal solution. The only supplementary iodine they have are some supplements for pregnant women. She told me that it contains 75mg (which tells me it might be safe to use this amount even, since it's considered safe for pregnant women). Which might just answer my question on dosage! It's sad though, just like all the info suggests in this thread- even pharmaceutical experts act all dumb when you ask them about what seems to be one of our most potent medicines- brainwashing everywhere!
 

Gaby

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Don Genaro said:
It's sad though, just like all the info suggests in this thread- even pharmaceutical experts act all dumb when you ask them about what seems to be one of our most potent medicines- brainwashing everywhere!
Sad indeed. It used to be a popular remedy even in mainstream medicine. Once upon a time...

Here is also a pretty good article about it: http://www.sott.net/articles/show/226366-Iodine-for-Health
 

dugdeep

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Don Genaro said:
The only supplementary iodine they have are some supplements for pregnant women. She told me that it contains 75mg (which tells me it might be safe to use this amount even, since it's considered safe for pregnant women). Which might just answer my question on dosage! It's sad though, just like all the info suggests in this thread- even pharmaceutical experts act all dumb when you ask them about what seems to be one of our most potent medicines- brainwashing everywhere!
I think that was probably 75 micrograms, not milligrams (mcg instead of mg). 75mg is a massive dose for iodine. 75mcg is more reasonable - about half the RDA. I can't see them dosing pregnant women with 2000 times the RDA of iodine :lol:
 

mb

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Skyfarmr said:
...Hey, on the subject of antiseptics, does anyone remember mercurochrome? How awful was that...?

For those of you too young to remember (or whose parents were wise enough not to buy it): Mercurochrome ( Merbromin) is a topical antiseptic used for minor cuts and scrapes. It is an organomercuric disodium salt compound and a fluorescein (I remember it being a brilliant red-orange color). It is readily available in most countries but no longer sold in the United States because of its mercury content. It was removed from the United States GRAS list in 1998, for fear of mercury poisoning and is apparently still sold in other countries (see wiki for more info)
Oh I remember it well. I had never thought about the mercury content. I suppose I received a fair dose of it.

I made the mistake of soaking kombu in a small bowl of water. It turned the water into slime. *ewww*

I do like dulse and nori. Perhaps they help with the mercurochrome exposure.
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
After checking through a lot of the same information Psyche posted (Didn't know the thread was here, duh :rolleyes:) I came across a few places that offered "Self tests" for low iodine, and according to those, I've got "Hypothyroidism so bad blood work may be abnormal." (site here: http://www.1-thyroid.com/lowthyroid.htm )

The test didn't do more than add points for symptoms, and the symptoms are fairly general, so its not going to send me running for the ER. My concern is that once the doctors spot low thyroid, out will come the drugs, and I'm trying to minimize that.

On one of the iodine supplementation sites, a comment was made for a home test to see if a person is deficient in iodine: take Tincture of Iodine ( that can be bought at drugstores for wounds or burns in tiny bottles), put some on a cotton ball, and rub it into the soft skin of the inner arm or thigh. If the stain fades away in an hour, you need more iodine. If it stays bright, you're fine.

According to what I've read, everyone in the country is low in Iodine, but this may be how you can supplement it until its possible to get some Lugols or Iodoral in tablet form. I like the Iodoral tablets so far, as they include selenium and other vitamins to help absorb the iodine. But they are expensive.

I've also wondered this: would adding DMSO to the iodine and painting that on the skin be helpful or not?
 

Laura

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You don't need the DMSO. I've got a bottle of betadine that I'm using up by smearing it on the inside bends of my arms.
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
Laura said:
You don't need the DMSO. I've got a bottle of betadine that I'm using up by smearing it on the inside bends of my arms.
Ok. I'll start with the Tincture and go from there. From what I've read, it can take a long to time to reach optimal levels, but its probably safer this way.
 

Mrs. Peel

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Gimpy said:
Laura said:
You don't need the DMSO. I've got a bottle of betadine that I'm using up by smearing it on the inside bends of my arms.
Ok. I'll start with the Tincture and go from there. From what I've read, it can take a long to time to reach optimal levels, but its probably safer this way.
I've taken this stuff, which was recommended by the Edgar Cayce readings. I bought a few bottles from the Cayce website years ago, took it for a while and put it aside, and pulled it out again a few months ago.

http://www.vitacost.com/Heritage-Products-Atomidine-Iodine
 

Gimpy

The Living Force
Did the 'patch test' mentioned on one of the sties...made a dark brown patch on the inset of my left elbow, and two other blobs just to see how fast things faded, this was at 7am EST.

Its now about 3:10pm, and all three blobs are barely visible. No skin reactions or rash.

Does it prove anything? Probably not. I didn't quite buy the whole 'fading away' bit, so it was interesting to try it out. ;)
 

melatonin

Jedi Master
I came across a board/forum where they were taking up to 200mg (not mcg) of iodine per day. They did admit that was high, but recommended a minimum of 50mg per day to start purging floruide and bromide from the system and to sort out halogen levels.

I plan to start soon but i havent got a clue on what dosage is safe and effective.
Most people are saying either low (mcg) or 50mg min. A big difference.
 

curious_richard

Jedi Master
melatonin said:
I came across a board/forum where they were taking up to 200mg (not mcg) of iodine per day.
That is high. The recommended dose to saturate the thyroid gland is 130mg per day. You might take this for a week or two to protect against radioactive iodine (nuclear caused). If 130mg saturates the thyroid, then I think the body would just discard the rest. Large doses can also cause an unpleasant metalic taste.

I think I read somewhere that 7mg was a healthy dose. This may have been from studies of the Japanese people and the iodine they get from the sea food they eat.
 

Foxx

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
FWIW, I did 3 weeks of 100mg/day in an attempt to kill candida and didn't notice any negative effects. It did feel like my thyroid was increasing in size towards the end (maybe for the last week?).

There's an article on SOTT talking about Iodine:
https://www.sott.net/articles/show/226366-Iodine-for-Health

People in the U.S. consume an average 240 micrograms (µg) of iodine a day. In contrast, people in Japan consume more than 12 milligrams (mg) of iodine a day (12,000 µg), a 50-fold greater amount. They eat seaweed, which include brown algae (kelp), red algae (nori sheets, with sushi), and green algae (chlorella). Compared to terrestrial plants, which contain only trace amounts of iodine (0.001 mg/gm), these marine plants have high concentrations of this nutrient (0.5 - 8.0 mg/gm). When studied in 1964, Japanese seaweed consumption was found to be 4.5 grams (gm) a day and that eaten had a measured iodine concentration of 3.1 mg/gm of seaweed (= 13.8 mg of iodine). According to public health officials, mainland Japanese now consume 14.5 gm of seaweed a day (= 45 mg of iodine, if its iodine content, not measured, remains unchanged)(link). Researchers have determined that residents on the coast of Hokkaido eat a quantity of seaweed sufficient to provide a daily iodine intake of 200 mg a day. Saltwater fish and shellfish contain iodine, but one would have to eat 15 - 25 pounds of fish to get 12 mg of iodine.
 
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