New Objective:Health Episode: The Hidden Dangers of Oxalates in Your Food‌ - Interview With Sally K. Norton

anartist

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Usually, my oxalates are coming mostly from tea. I would sometimes double the teabags and even drink two cups. And on weekends I drink a cup around lunch. This adds up with the doubled tea bags. Also I put stevia in the cup. Liquid is low in oxalates, but powdered stevia is high. I recently bought some coconut butter cups made with dark chocolate. But doing some math it seems that two cups have 13mg of oxalates, so not too bad for chocolate.

I take a multi B vitamin so I'm guessing my B1 and B6 are ok. I take magnesium citrate before bed, so probably not neutralizing anything by then. I almost always take enzymes with meals, so my fat digestion should be good. I also take a probiotic. Once I get through this chocolate and then limit my tea, I should be back to low oxalates.

Butter has 48mg of calcium per 100g. But I usually eat around 60g of butter, so 28.8 mg of calcium. Not sure if all of that will bind to the oxalates. I have some calcium tablets that are 250mg each, but I stopped taking them because I tend to form calcium deposits.

I stopped taking glycine with my tea. I was taking it because I take a drop of Iodine twice a day 5 days a week. I think I might add it back though. Also wondering how much Vitamin C is too much, because that can make you produce oxalates? I take 3 or 4 grams around 2 hours after taking Iodine.

Just writing down my notes taken after re-listening to two of those podcasts on oxalates recently.
Thus is what Gaby has to say about Vitamin C
 

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I stopped taking glycine with my tea. I was taking it because I take a drop of Iodine twice a day 5 days a week. I think I might add it back though. Also wondering how much Vitamin C is too much, because that can make you produce oxalates? I take 3 or 4 grams around 2 hours after taking Iodine.

Just writing down my notes taken after re-listening to two of those podcasts on oxalates recently.
This stuff is highly individual. As you know, there are no set-rules or absolutes with peoples health.

I personally take 3-4g of vitamin C everyday, and that seems to be ESSENTIAL for my gut health. Other people also benefit greatly from taking anywhere from 1-4 grams aswell.

However, I have multiple clients who I work with who can't take vitamin C in that dose, and those are the ones with established oxalate problems. Vitamin C intolerance is a very real thing for them, and their limit seems to be approximately 500mg per day. Anything more, and they will enter some kind of crisis for a few days or a week or so.

So, it needs to be tailored to each person. Likewise, glycine is beneficial for most, whilst problematic for a few who have real bad oxalate problems... primarily in the context of endogenous synthesis in the liver.

For those people, addressing thiamine, B6, and oxidative stress, before megadosing vitamin C and glycine :)
 

lilies

Jedi Council Member
The young apricot tree in our garden began to produce ripe fruit. They will be edible in a couple days. I already sampled three from the highest branches and one wormy from the floor. Looked up the oxalate content of apricots and made a surprise discovery:
Dried apricot is HIGH in oxalates.
Fresh apricot or canned is LOW in oxalates.
Conclusion: Apparently losing most of its water transforms the fruit structure, creating glass shards inside. Lots of lots of dried apricots are sold in stores as snacks.
 
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