New Show: MindMatters (RIP Truth Perspective)

Alejo

Ambassador
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FOTCM Member
Just a heads up, we'll be doing the interview with her this Wednesday. So if peeps have any questions they'd like for us to ask now is the time to post them!
Awesome! I'll see if any other ones come to mind.. thanks so very much for doing this guys :)

I haven't listened to your latest show, I have saved it for my monday commute, but I wanted to say that you guys did an outstanding job with the one about The Lives of Other's it has been one of my favorite movies ever since I watched it.
 

Mari

Jedi Council Member
Just a heads up, we'll be doing the interview with her this Wednesday. So if peeps have any questions they'd like for us to ask now is the time to post them!
Can´t wait!!! I don´t have questions only praises for her work!

It just popped in my head that for a regency seating party you need even number of men to women, right, and I´m wondering if you will have other guests? ;-D
 

Adobe

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I’m guessing this subject will come up, but just in case. Some of the things she writes are so core to humanity, and our development, and she, as other writers discuss that sometimes the scripts write themselves, and they feel like an observer to the story.

So, a question: does she feel at those times that she is bringing up a life time of her own experience and learning, or for lack of a better word, is she channeling the human conciseness?

E.g., in the book Someone to Love, Anna the teacher is teaching through stories, and intertwining the stories into the students’ daily lives. It is stated that this is how man-kind has always learned (How Jordan Peterson-like)

That theme is carried on in the next book in the series, how the children are given projects that will involve them working-together in several disciplines to solve daily problems. All the while they feel like they are playing a game enjoying themselves a learning to boot! I’m not sure if that’s a good example, but I’m sure you understand the point. Maybe put another way. Are there times you feel you are writing above your pay grade? If so, what do you think about that?
 

ryu

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Just a heads up, we'll be doing the interview with her this Wednesday. So if peeps have any questions they'd like for us to ask now is the time to post them!
This is great. Really, thank you guys, I'm sure this show will be one of your best!

A question I have for her is how she manages to create characters that are so far removed from her own circumstances. (She's not a noble, she's not a man etc..)

Another question would be if she ever wanted to create a story outside of the Regency/Victorian times? Does she thinks it could work in another era?

And lastly, does she believe those values will come back at the forefront of our culture one day, in one form or another?

Thanks!
 

Doug

Padawan Learner
Just a heads up, we'll be doing the interview with her this Wednesday. So if peeps have any questions they'd like for us to ask now is the time to post them!

I've read 20 Regency novels from the list so far, so why do I still feel hopelessly single? ;-)

More seriously, I'd love to hear about why she chose to write regency novels. I'd bet there is a good story to it!
 

Alejo

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That theme is carried on in the next book in the series, how the children are given projects that will involve them working-together in several disciplines to solve daily problems. All the while they feel like they are playing a game enjoying themselves a learning to boot! I’m not sure if that’s a good example, but I’m sure you understand the point. Maybe put another way. Are there times you feel you are writing above your pay grade? If so, what do you think about that?
I was thinking along these lines, and I thought that a nice question to ask her could be: Has she done research on cognitive sciences or esoteric knowledge as part of her writing efforts? and if so, what avenues has she delved into? Or does what she writes come from inspiration?
 

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Maybe if you think it is a good question: what authors or writers influenced her? How to read romantic novels can help the readers, from her point of vue? She is an excellent writer, why did she choose to write romantic novels instead of a "normal" novel? By normal I think you understand what I mean. What I don't mean is that romance novels are abnormal! :lol:
 

Adaryn

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
A possible question: does she enjoy reading historical fiction which deals with real historical figures, like books from historical novelists such as Anne O' Brien, Philippa Gregory, Alison Weir and the likes? Has she ever thought of tackling that particular genre, or would she feel too "constrained" in her creativity, since for such books you need to stick to historical, biographical facts - though the writers mentioned above mostly write about Medieval & Early modern historical figures, and the life of those women is often shrouded in mystery, which gives the writers a lot of leeway/latitude in terms of imagining what their "inner" life was, what they thought, how they felt etc.
 
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Adaryn

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FOTCM Member
Another question: in many of your books (and others in the same genre), there's that almost instant sexual/physical attraction between the 2 main protagonists, who most of the time are just complete strangers. In your mind, is this attraction something akin to 'instant recognition", the physical manifestation of something "higher"/more spiritual going on, something that is already "there" - an emotional "otherworldly" bond that already exists on a deeper, unconscious level but that the characters have yet to bring to conscious awareness?
Or is this attraction first purely physical - like, it's only a "facilitator" that makes the characters want to learn more about each other, to commit, which then allows them to forge that deeper bond later on, as they get to really know each other? In the former case, the process would be top - down, and in the latter, it would be down - up. Not sure I'm clear, but I thought I'd throw it out there :-)
 

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Another question: in many of your books (and others in the same genre), there's that almost instant sexual/physical attraction between the 2 main protagonists, who most of the time are just complete strangers. In your mind, is this attraction something akin to 'instant recognition", the physical manifestation of something "higher"/more spiritual going on, something that is already "there" - an emotional "otherworldly" bond that already exists on a deeper, unconscious level but that the characters have yet to bring to conscious awareness?
Or is this attraction first purely physical - like, it's only a "facilitator" that makes the characters want to learn more about each other, to commit, which then allows them to forge that deeper bond later on, as they get to really know each other? In the former case, the process would be top - down, and in the latter, it would be down - up. Not sure I'm clear, but I thought I'd throw it out there :-)
I think the question of sex is very important. Also why it is so important sex in these novels? Is it because sex is a taboo and these romances fight the taboo? I am curious of her idea about it.
 

Alejo

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I think the question of sex is very important. Also why it is so important sex in these novels? Is it because sex is a taboo and these romances fight the taboo? I am curious of her idea about it.
I concur, and my reading of it so far is that the sexual tension as she describes it at least, is the catalyst to break the norm. The stepping into chaos, as JBP would put it perhaps, and thus the entering of the characters into creative potential, what throws the heroes into adventure to find themselves. Where their security is put at risk but with the potential of becoming more than mere individual safety. It's also a moment of truth that showers the rigid lifestyles with a question.

Another few questions that came up to me today, would be if there's any particular novel or series that she holds dear? or one that she remembers fondly and why?

Does she have a favorite character in her vast catalog? or one that she found particularly difficult?

And, perhaps, is there anything she would hope her writing could achieve?

That's all I got for now and you guys will be interviewing her whilst I am at work I presume, so I wish you guys the absolute best with her. May everything run smoothly :)
 

Ennio

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Thank you for your previous podcast on romantic fiction. I really enjoyed it and am so looking forward to your upcoming interview with Mary Balogh. I think it is wonderful that she is coming on your show. Very exciting!

We just recorded the show with Mary Balogh yesterday - and coming in at about two hours of discussion we covered a lot of different bases; including most of the questions posted here. She's every bit the lovely person you might imagine she'd be, and we think you'll enjoy the show greatly :-)

Revisiting another big subject here the most recent MindMatters show is an interview with Philip Barlag, author of a great little volume called The Leadership Genius of Julius Caesar.

Back story: We read this book a few years ago, really liked it, and Harrison wrote Philip over a year ago asking him if he'd like to do a show with us. Philp only recently wrote back several weeks ago to say that yes he would, more weeks went by, and then the proverbial stars aligned to do the interview. Well, I think it was worth the wait. For a self-described amateur historian he sure had some good insights into what Julius Caesar was all about:

MindMatters: Phillip Barlag: The Leadership Genius of Julius Caesar


Power-hungry despot. Dictator for life. Vain ladies' man. Murdered by his peers for aspiring to be king. That was Julius Caesar, at least according to his critics and modern interpreters. But countless portrayals of the most famous Roman - in histories, novels, plays and films - omit what were quite likely his greatest features: his multifaceted genius, unparalleled leadership skill, and, remarkable for the times in which he lived, his humanity. Those skills - and their relevance for leadership today - have gone mostly unnoticed.

So this week on MindMatters we discuss The Leadership Genius of Julius Caesar with author Phillip Barlag. This examination of Caesar's accomplishments not only brings a fresh perspective on who Caesar was, but also hones in on the qualities that made him an exemplary leader of ancient Rome and what lessons we can draw from the accounts of his life and character. What emerges is an alternative reading of Caesar, not as a wholly self-serving tyrant, but a politically skilled reformer, man of the people, and all around exceptional human being.

Preorder Phillip's new book here

Find us on LBRY!


 

Debra Lynn

Padawan Learner
We just recorded the show with Mary Balogh yesterday - and coming in at about two hours of discussion we covered a lot of different bases; including most of the questions posted here. She's every bit the lovely person you might imagine she'd be, and we think you'll enjoy the show greatly :-)

Revisiting another big subject here the most recent MindMatters show is an interview with Philip Barlag, author of a great little volume called The Leadership Genius of Julius Caesar.

Back story: We read this book a few years ago, really liked it, and Harrison wrote Philip over a year ago asking him if he'd like to do a show with us. Philp only recently wrote back several weeks ago to say that yes he would, more weeks went by, and then the proverbial stars aligned to do the interview. Well, I think it was worth the wait. For a self-described amateur historian he sure had some good insights into what Julius Caesar was all about:

MindMatters: Phillip Barlag: The Leadership Genius of Julius Caesar





This was a fascinating interview. I really enjoyed hearing about Caesar and his leadership qualities. Seems he was able to process so much information coming at him from different directions and make sense of it and use it wisely. A great soul! When Mr. Barlag was talking about this it did remind me of Laura. I don't know how they do what they do, but it is to be admired. I'm probably going to have to get this book and add it to the romance novels now. Seems he was also a bit of a lady's man if I am understanding correctly.
 
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