Perimenopause

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hi everyone,
I've run into a dilemma with peri-menopause and the iodine protocol. I thought I would post it here on the peri-menopause thread due to the girly issue nature of it. If y'all think it would be good to include in the iodine thread, too.

My periods have been fairly normal for some time. I've been keeping a calendar of them and they are early or late, but normal. When I started the Iodine protocol in November, I was 2 weeks late. Within 3 days of starting the iodine, I started my period. It hasn't stopped since. There were a few days here and there when I was pulse dosing with the iodine that it would abate for a couple of days, but it always came back. It wasn't too bad, the flow was normal with a brief flooding event and I just figured it was the nature of peri-menopause. The flow progressively increased and I thought that the iodine was affecting my estrogen causing estrogen dominance, so I stopped the iodine all together on 1/3/16. My periods have gotten progressive worse since I stopped the iodine. A lot of flooding, clots. I've tried ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, chlorophyll, chasteberry, DIM and lots of primrose oil to slow it down to no avail. The primrose and DIM did work, it seemed, off and on.

I was taking selenium, boron, niacinamide, sunflower lecithin, milk thistle, ALA, NAC, minerals (no copper or iron), plus vitamin C, primrose, 1200IU vitamin E in divided doses, bromelain, magnesium and probiotics (at night). I've stopped taking everything, but vitamin C, NAC and minerals. (I've caught the head cold going around). I've also added a B vitamin multi in the past couple of weeks. I eat a lot of meat, so I haven't been worried about supplementing with iron. I have done two rounds of DMSA in the past 30 days for 2 nights of 200mg with a 5 day re-mineralizing break in between.

I am planning on making an appointment to go to the doctor. I am not sure what they can do. It could be a cyst on my ovaries. I don't think its anything else like fibroids or other physical things that might cause it. I think an MD should check, though, just to be sure. There might be an emotional component, too. In the past few days, I've gotten upset and the flooding seems to coincide with that, but it's only been in the past few days that I've noticed.

I thought to start the iodine again since menstruation was occurring, but it was much better than it is now. That thought crossed my mind when I was doing full EE last night. I've thought to dose myself with a high amount of progesterone cream as recommended in a couple of my menopause books, but everything I've done since to make things worse, not better. Other than seeing a doctor, not sure what else I can do. Any suggestions?
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Menrva said:
I thought to start the iodine again since menstruation was occurring, but it was much better than it is now. That thought crossed my mind when I was doing full EE last night. I've thought to dose myself with a high amount of progesterone cream as recommended in a couple of my menopause books, but everything I've done since to make things worse, not better. Other than seeing a doctor, not sure what else I can do. Any suggestions?

It will be good to have some feedback from the doc. Hopefully s/he'll do an ultrasound to see if there is a specific cause of the bleeding or if it is the progression of perimenopause.

Iodine + progesterone could shrink fibroids. Progesterone would act as a carrier to the iodine and some people use topical remedies on top of oral lugol. But if it is not a fibroid, we'll have to keep in mind that iodine works at the hormonal level, helping to clear out xenoestrogens. If there is perimenopause in the background, some troubleshooting could be expected.

Fiber could help clear out the xenoestrogens:

http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,40637.0.html

Some are recommending to eat at least 25 grams of fiber in a paleo diet in order to "flush out" xenoestrogens:

_http://www.lifestylebypoliquin.com/Lifestyle/StayHealthy/393/Is_Estrogen_Dominance_Making_You_Fat.aspx?_.aspx

That seems like a worthy experiment, I would only choose the source of fiber wisely.
 

etezete

Jedi Council Member
Gaby said:
Menrva said:
I thought to start the iodine again since menstruation was occurring, but it was much better than it is now. That thought crossed my mind when I was doing full EE last night. I've thought to dose myself with a high amount of progesterone cream as recommended in a couple of my menopause books, but everything I've done since to make things worse, not better. Other than seeing a doctor, not sure what else I can do. Any suggestions?

It will be good to have some feedback from the doc. Hopefully s/he'll do an ultrasound to see if there is a specific cause of the bleeding or if it is the progression of perimenopause.

Iodine + progesterone could shrink fibroids. Progesterone would act as a carrier to the iodine and some people use topical remedies on top of oral lugol. But if it is not a fibroid, we'll have to keep in mind that iodine works at the hormonal level, helping to clear out xenoestrogens. If there is perimenopause in the background, some troubleshooting could be expected.

Fiber could help clear out the xenoestrogens:

http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,40637.0.html

Some are recommending to eat at least 25 grams of fiber in a paleo diet in order to "flush out" xenoestrogens:

_http://www.lifestylebypoliquin.com/Lifestyle/StayHealthy/393/Is_Estrogen_Dominance_Making_You_Fat.aspx?_.aspx

That seems like a worthy experiment, I would only choose the source of fiber wisely.

I am sorry, Menrva, that I am not able to give any advice... but I heard only once from a friend of a menstrual bleeding that didn't stop anymore and it turned out to be an uterus polypus. They removed it and problem was solved. When you make an appointment with a medic I can only recommend to ask whether it can be such a polypus. My friend back then got this information only from the forth doctor she visited...

Another thing that strikes me: I am doing Iodine as well and I am definitely in perimenopause. I recently tried muscle testing (maybe not the best idea for me at the time) and so it came to a pulsing mode, too. I had two days, not in a row, with each seven drops of Lugol's 5% (one day 7 drops, next day nothing, third day 7 drops again; before and after no Iodine due to the muscle testing). What I experienced after these 2 pulsing days was not only a slight metallic taste on the tip and border of my tongue (that persists until now), but some days of pain in the underbelly, exactly like I had when I still had my period. But no bleeding followed. I also wondered what that was and whether it is in connection with the Iodine; I had the feeling it is so, but I am not sure.
 

Mariama

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FOTCM Member
I was post menopausal for about 18 months but last week I had another period. I knew something was up before my period began, because I burnt my hand on the wood stove, broke one of my crystals, almost slammed a handsaw in my face, experienced brain fog and felt very dizzy at times. (Usually, I am pretty careful.)
Also, had some aches and pains in my back and pelvis. It was a period like any other during these last years and the bleeding stopped a few days ago. I could not detect any blood clots, just a sliver. My GP has referred me to a gynaecologist and I spoke to Gaby via Skype who gave me some sound advice. I am on iodine and now take 1 drop a day, one day off as Gaby said.

The area where I live will be a testing ground for 5G in the near future and if I understand correctly they are now using 4G technology extra strong, if it's true what they are saying.

Then today I found this article on SOTT:
People's exposures to EMFs (electromagnetic frequencies) have been known to result in, for examples, neurological effects, brain tumours, learning difficulties, nervous, hormonal and behavioural problems... It has been said that the same will happen with 5G technology.

https://www.sott.net/article/346389-5G-technology-and-the-coming-health-crisis

So, I am wondering now whether this could be related. I will have to do more research, though.
 

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Mariama said:
Then today I found this article on SOTT:
People's exposures to EMFs (electromagnetic frequencies) have been known to result in, for examples, neurological effects, brain tumours, learning difficulties, nervous, hormonal and behavioural problems... It has been said that the same will happen with 5G technology.

https://www.sott.net/article/346389-5G-technology-and-the-coming-health-crisis

So, I am wondering now whether this could be related. I will have to do more research, though.

It could be related or it could be the ups and downs of menopause. :) There are some studies that show EMF does have an affect on hormones. I am not sure if the effect would be increased for the changing brains of menopausal women.

EMF pollution: The health impacts of wireless RF radiation

There are endocrine disruptor chemicals everywhere, too and the tiniest of doses can have an effect.
How Endocrine Disruptors Destroy Your Body + The Dirty Dozen to Avoid

If you haven't already read "New Menopausal Years: The Wise Woman Way" by Susan Reed, I'd highly recommend it. Along with alternative remedies, there is also a lot of wisdom about menopause. It's really a wonderful book.
 

Keyhole

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FOTCM Member
Interesting thread. I recently finished a book by Ray Peat called "From PMS to Menopause". It is available for free to download here.

What I found most interesting was that Peat, like others (including Hans Selye and Albert Szent-Gyiorgi), classified estrogen as a stress hormone... not a "female hormone". It puts forth that the idea of assigning gender to a hormone neglects the sheer complexity and global functioning of each individual substance, and inevitably hampers our ability to understand the way that it functions. From what I understand, Selye showed that estrogen mimicked the "shock" stage of the stress reaction, and that it rapidly deprived tissues of oxygen, therefore inducing local hypoxia.

The above book makes the statement that carcinogenic and estrogenic effects are synonymous with eachother, as both effects are essentially similar (namely, depriving a cell of oxygen, amongst other things). The author's premise is that there is probably no such thing as "good" estrogen which can counter the "bad" estrogen. Rather, he points out that estrogen is a powerful stimuli for growth of tissue, a potent mitochondrial inhibitor, and if left unchecked (due to a lack of progesterone or other factors) ultimately leads to pathology - both local and systemic. His view (based on some pretty convincing evidence) is that estrogen is generally a "pro-stress" hormone, while progesterone is an "anti-stress" hormone. This is disregarding female or male assignments. Aside from the xeno-estrogenic substances we come across in the environment, he particularly focuses on polyunsaturated oil's uncanny ability to induce the formation of estrogens, mainly by prompting the conversion of other hormones via aromatases.

He argues that synthetic progestines actually inhibit progesterones actions. But he also showed in his research that the most effect solvent for progesterone was vitamin E.

I don't know much about the natural progesterone cream's effectiveness. But I have read that he has had great results with prescribing topical progesterone solution dissolved in vitamin E to both men and women for a variety of estrogen dominant conditions (which in his view, is most acquired conditions).

After reading his and other's research, I started using pregnenelone w/DHEA from IdeaLabsDC (dissolved in DMSO) on my testicles to hopefully increase my progesterone and testosterone levels, to counteract some of the excess estrogen I have.

Granted, I don't know much about menopause, so I can't really vouch for the ideas presented in the above book. But it is a pretty fascinating topic, and from what I can see, the research seems to support most of Peat's statements. And it is also interesting to do a search on PubMed to see estrogen levels in different pathologies, because all seem to be elevated.

So the company I use is called IdealabsDC, run by a guy on the "raypeatforum". He produces quite a few different supplements, all of them seem to be high quality, one being progesterone which is dissolved in DMSO. The supplement is called "Progestene" for anyone who might be interested, and the link for the website is here.
 

Nancy2feathers

The Living Force
If you haven't already read "New Menopausal Years: The Wise Woman Way" by Susan Reed, I'd highly recommend it. Along with alternative remedies, there is also a lot of wisdom about menopause. It's really a wonderful book.

I believe the author's name is Susun Weed. https://www.amazon.com/New-Menopausal-Years-Alternative-Approaches/dp/1888123036

I found her book and youtube videos very informative also. :)
 

Ask-Seek-Knock

Padawan Learner
Menrva said:
Hi everyone,
I've run into a dilemma with peri-menopause and the iodine protocol. I thought I would post it here on the peri-menopause thread due to the girly issue nature of it. If y'all think it would be good to include in the iodine thread, too.

My periods have been fairly normal for some time. I've been keeping a calendar of them and they are early or late, but normal. When I started the Iodine protocol in November, I was 2 weeks late. Within 3 days of starting the iodine, I started my period. It hasn't stopped since. There were a few days here and there when I was pulse dosing with the iodine that it would abate for a couple of days, but it always came back. It wasn't too bad, the flow was normal with a brief flooding event and I just figured it was the nature of peri-menopause. The flow progressively increased and I thought that the iodine was affecting my estrogen causing estrogen dominance, so I stopped the iodine all together on 1/3/16. My periods have gotten progressive worse since I stopped the iodine. A lot of flooding, clots. I've tried ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, chlorophyll, chasteberry, DIM and lots of primrose oil to slow it down to no avail. The primrose and DIM did work, it seemed, off and on.

Hi Menrva,

I also had a weird reaction with my period when I first started Lugol's 2% Iodine drops in February. I track my periods on the calendar as well.

So, I had my normal "scheduled" period on February 14 (lasted 4 days). I started the iodine drops on February 21st (only 1 drop at first) and on February 25th I got my period again! It was heavy and lasted for almost 7 days! Which hasn't happened since my late 20's. I'm 41 now and as I noted earlier, it normally lasts 4 days with only two semi-heavy days. I definitley freaked out but kept taking the drops, increasing the dose weekly until I reached the 25mg daily dose (10 drops of the 2% solution). My periods are on schedule again and I feel great. Not sure what the heck happened. I figured my body needed to release some junk and that was the most efficient way to do it. Who knows! Hope this helps!
 

Meg

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Ask-Seek-Knock said:
Hi Menrva,

I also had a weird reaction with my period when I first started Lugol's 2% Iodine drops in February. I track my periods on the calendar as well.

So, I had my normal "scheduled" period on February 14 (lasted 4 days). I started the iodine drops on February 21st (only 1 drop at first) and on February 25th I got my period again! It was heavy and lasted for almost 7 days! Which hasn't happened since my late 20's. I'm 41 now and as I noted earlier, it normally lasts 4 days with only two semi-heavy days. I definitley freaked out but kept taking the drops, increasing the dose weekly until I reached the 25mg daily dose (10 drops of the 2% solution). My periods are on schedule again and I feel great. Not sure what the heck happened. I figured my body needed to release some junk and that was the most efficient way to do it. Who knows! Hope this helps!

It definitely helps. Thanks for sharing. My experience has been the same with the iodine. I think it's the balancing of hormones and detoxing that comes with iodine therapy, that and just plain menopause. I experimented with a few iodine douches too and those seemed to have helped quite a bit. My periods are so mellow now, I sometimes forget I am having one. I think the iodine and other supplements have done the trick. :D
 

nature

Dagobah Resident
wonderfull red clover for perimenopause:
https://www.sott.net/article/347894-6-hormone-balancing-powers-of-red-clover
 

Mariama

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I believe the author's name is Susun Weed. New Menopausal Years: Alternative Approaches for Women 30-90 (3) (Wise Woman Herbal): Susun S. Weed: 9781888123036: Amazon.com: Books

I found her book and youtube videos very informative also. :)

I don't know in which thread this belongs, so I am posting it here. I I found this interesting tidbit in Susun Weed's New Menopausal Years - The Wise Woman Way about andropause or male menopause which basically explains why andropause can be quite challenging for men just as menopause can be challenging for women:

Men's symptoms during andropause are similar to women's during menopause: disturbances of self-image triggered by weight gain, hair loss, and wrinkles; memory problems; lessening of sexual urgency; emotional sensitivity and anxiety, even hot flashes. Additionally, men experience more visual problems during andropause, and lose some strength and endurance.

Then this bit:

Mid-life brings far-reaching changes throughout the entire body/psyche/mind for all of you: women and men. Men and women alike must embrace (or resist) the task of aging and ponder (or deny) the reality of dying. Approach yourselves with loving kindness during the process of your menopause, your andropause. Let go of how you are accustomed to seeing yourself. Allow yourself to act in new ways. Then, as those hormones that have ruled your behaviour since puberty wane, you will find yourself open to greater peace, deeper satisfaction, and a more fundamental abundance than ever before.

How I wish I had known this earlier.:-P

FWIW.
 

KristinLynne

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Exactly. My husband knew more about what was going on than I did because I was too emotional to deal with it. If I said or did something whacky (and believe me, I DID), he could check his database, see what was going on (there was a regular cycle even right up to the end), and knew that total indulgence was the only course to take.

Yes, I was irrational and hypervigilant, paranoid, you name it. Having someone who was always ready with the right words, actions, comfort, cuppa tea, whatever, was a godsend. I made it through with almost NO collateral damage to anyone else for which I am eternally grateful.

This is beautiful! I couldn't even imagine.
 

Mariama

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I just found this and thought it might belong in this thread. More advantages of taking vitamin D?


Added:
In accordance with an earlier report, our result also showed vitamin D supplementations improve vaginal maturation.[13]
CONCLUSION
The results of this study showed vitamin D have protective effects for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women, and in particular this methods is expensive [they probably mean inexpensive], practical and easy to reach. It is a new safe therapeutically agent, without any reaction and have effects in improving the VMV. Therefore, the application of vitamin D in vaginal atrophy treatment should be pursued.
 
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