Quinton Plasma/Water, or "percutaneous hydrotomy"

Yes, that is my plan. I haven't ordered the books, unfortunately my brain is not working as before so I hardly read anything at the moment, just don't comprehend or don't remember what I've read 5 min before, so I hope she will be satisfied with Gabys article, since she is very thorough and scientific minded.

Right now I don't remember how often you can do it, something about starting with 5 ml and increase to 10 ml, but I will listen to my body. And I think I have the equipment due to trying local anesthetic/sterile water for reducing pain, otherwise she can probably get the right syringes and stuff.

Must read Gabys article and other links again…..

Thanks
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Yes, that is my plan. I haven't ordered the books, unfortunately my brain is not working as before so I hardly read anything at the moment, just don't comprehend or don't remember what I've read 5 min before, so I hope she will be satisfied with Gabys article, since she is very thorough and scientific minded.

Right now I don't remember how often you can do it, something about starting with 5 ml and increase to 10 ml, but I will listen to my body. And I think I have the equipment due to trying local anesthetic/sterile water for reducing pain, otherwise she can probably get the right syringes and stuff.

Must read Gabys article and other links again…..

Thanks
From the "Overview" article linked above:

Intramuscular doses commonly discussed in the literature tend to fall within the 3 to 10 cc range. The safety and utility of a twice-weekly schedule has been demonstrated in the historical literature [*8], which schedule is in concert with Dr. Rosenow's twice-weekly administration of antigen and antibody for chronic diseases such as MS. As advocated by Dr. Rosenow in the case of MS, a responsible family member might be instructed in administering the therapy, insofar as it may have to be continued indefinitely.
 
Thanks. Yes, since my partner has injected me subcutaneously/intracutaneously with both local anastethic and sterile water 1-200 times without any problems (instructed first by some understanding doctors), as an attempt to reduce my pain instead of using pain killers, I will suggest that my nurse friend just instruct us how to do it and when she is comfortable and feels we can do it, we will do it ourselves.

We don't want her to risk her licence or involve her in "illegal" practices so to speak. I sent her all the info I could find, so we will see...

We will start slowly.
 

Ant22

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
From the "Overview" article linked above:

Intramuscular doses commonly discussed in the literature tend to fall within the 3 to 10 cc range. The safety and utility of a twice-weekly schedule has been demonstrated in the historical literature [*8], which schedule is in concert with Dr. Rosenow's twice-weekly administration of antigen and antibody for chronic diseases such as MS. As advocated by Dr. Rosenow in the case of MS, a responsible family member might be instructed in administering the therapy, insofar as it may have to be continued indefinitely.

I asked a family member who is a nurse to perform autohemotherapy on me and she initially agreed. She's quite into unconventional methods or natural remedies such as iodine, but she called me today telling me she was quite scared to do it.She also said she did ear of blood injections that have been purified but she's never heard of injecting blood that has just been drawn from a patient's body. She was afraid I'd end up with an infection, a bruise that would struggle to heal or I'd end up hospitalised and would have to explain how I ended up with the problem in the first place.

I can see where she's coming from, she's scared she'd get in trouble professionally. She said she'd read up about it and get back to me tomorrow. Sources in Polish are really scared and mostly consist of circumstantial evidence so I'm not holding my breath. Plus, she's a member of the older generation and she's not super internet competent.

In case she does agree to help me out, what should the place where blood was injected look like? Should it have a bruise? Is higher temperature afterwards normal? Is it going to hurt for a couple of hours / days? I'm asking so if she does agree to do it, I don't end up mistaking a normal reaction for a negative one. I must admit hearing from a qualified nurse with decades of experience that it doesn't sound like the safest thing ever did make me a bit concerned. Yet I'm quite determined to give it a go.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
In case she does agree to help me out, what should the place where blood was injected look like? Should it have a bruise? Is higher temperature afterwards normal? Is it going to hurt for a couple of hours / days?
It could go either or. I would start with 3 cc and see how it goes. I wouldn't worry too much about it though.
 

Ant22

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
It could go either or. I would start with 3 cc and see how it goes. I wouldn't worry too much about it though.

Thank you Gaby, fingers crossed she says 'yes' then. I'm not too keen on learning something like this from YouTube, partially because I'm scared of needles and any form of injections as it is.
 
Last edited:

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Thank you Gaby, fingers crossed she says 'yes' then. I'm not too keen on learning something like things from YouTube, partially because I'm scared of needles and any form of injections as it is.
Whatever happens, just don't tense your gluteal muscles at the time of the injection. That will not help! Relax them as if you're in your favorite nature spot.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Sometimes I have a bruise at the injection site, but it doesn't bother me; doesn't hurt. The whole process is so simple and fast, I hardly think about it anymore except to remember to do it because I sure do feel better!!!
 
Ant22, I'ven been donating blood during a 10 year period long time ago plus I've been doing around 30-40 blood tests the last 5 years, and B12 injections, and I can tell you that bruises sometimes happens, even if it is done by professionals, so I wouldn't worry about that. If your nurse is perfoming it with professional and sterilised equipment etc I would say that the chance of getting an infection is pretty slim….my take on it. And I will do it.
 

Ant22

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Ant22, I'ven been donating blood during a 10 year period long time ago plus I've been doing around 30-40 blood tests the last 5 years, and B12 injections, and I can tell you that bruises sometimes happens, even if it is done by professionals, so I wouldn't worry about that. If your nurse is perfoming it with professional and sterilised equipment etc I would say that the chance of getting an infection is pretty slim….my take on it. And I will do it.

Thanks for that worldbridger. I'm not a blood donor but I am a firm believer in testing so I get blood tests done a couple of times a year. Bruising is not a surprise there but I was wondering whether it would be normal to experience it where the blood is injected in the muscle.

I've made my mind about giving autohemotherapy a go and even if the nurse family member bails out, I'm working on an alternative arrangement. :-) The plan is not only to have it done. I will have to learn to do it myself because my chances of finding someone to do for me when I get back to London are pretty much non-existent.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
According to the theory of AutoHemo, part of the way it works is because it induces the body to believe an injury is present so that it mobilizes all the repair mechanisms to examine the "wound" and send in the correct defenses. Since the "wound" consists of your own blood that has been exposed to light and air, thereby weakening those pathogens that work only in darkness and absence of oxygen, which may be present in the blood, or markers of other conditions, it acts as a sort of auto-immunization to EXACTLY what is present in YOUR system at the very time of drawing. In other words, no lab could more precisely design a vaccine against whatever is ailing you than your own body. Your own blood has in it all the signs, signals, and sometimes even pathogens, of exactly what is wrong with you all the time.

So, since the primary trigger for all this activity is an "induced wound", it is only natural that it acts and even occasionally looks like a bruise. After all, a bruise is simply broken blood vessels bleeding within the body with no outlet. But in this case, there are no broken blood vessels, just the blood there, and it is generally cleared away by the body fairly rapidly, with its constituents being recycled. But, since the injection site is usually the gluteus maximus, it is unlikely that anyone is going to see or comment on it except an intimate partner. Ark has noted a small bruise on my backside a couple of times...

As to whether it hurts, sometimes it is a slight bit uncomfortable because of the state of the blood/body at that precise moment. It is furiously interesting to me how the blood itself changes from one week to the next. It can go from thick and viscous (probably not a good state), and almost black, to thin and watery (good) and more red within a few weeks. And clotting tendencies change too. That is why it is usually a good idea to inject as quickly as possible, before it begins to clot, though some practitioners actually wait for clotting because they say that this state is more effective against some conditions. It's not a bad idea to buy the book about it and read it.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/AutoBlood-Magic-Shot-Autohemotherapy-Bloodletting/dp/1535408928/ref=sr_1_3

Having been trained as a nurse many years ago, I am actually surprised at the ignorance of your nurse friend. A good basic knowledge of physiology ought to help one to reason out what AutoHemo is and why it should work. To be afraid of your own blood causing an infection strikes me as a bit over-the-top, assuming one is using normal sterile procedures as nurses are taught to do; at least they were taught such when I was in school. I don't think Poland is that different.

I would say that proper procedures being a given, it is about the safest therapy ever conceived and can be utilized on a range of conditions too numerous to mention, and on people who have not responded to anything else and are weakened even to the point of dying.
 

Ant22

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thank you for your help and suggestions Laura. :flowers: I just received a phone call from the family member saying she will help me out with this and I'll have it done at the clinic where she works as a nurse. She asked around about this and one of her colleagues had dome it to patients before, so that colleague will be the one to perform the first injection in about an hour's time. Santa visited me early this year! :wow:

I guess a large part of the fear was based on being afraid of professional complications if it causes a problem. She's nearing retirement age and if she lost her job she'd be almost unemployable. So although I told her that in case of trouble I'd tell doctors I did this to myself, she was a bit hesitant.
 
After reading just a little bit about injection in general in the buttocks (not about autohemotherapy and how to do it exactly, maybe it is slightly different) they say that the most crucial thing is to avoid the ischiatic nerve, could hurt as hell and even damage the nerve for a longer period of time, avoid any blood vessels (don't know if this is so important in AHT), and of course using sterile equipment etc.

Second, if the dose (meds in general I guess) is greater than 2 ml they prefer doing it in the buttocks,
ventrogluteal in musculus gluteus medius (hurts less they say and is less likely to come in contact with the ischiatic nerve) or dorsoglutealt in musculus gluteus maximus, or in the leg, musculus vastus lateralis och musculus rectus femoris.

Also, to make sure you are injecting it in the muscle you use the "pinch test". You take a good grip with you thumb and index finger of the persons skin and subcutaneous fat, measure it, and then divide it with 2, and then depending on sex and age you add 6 to 13 mm to make sure the blood reaches the muscle. 13 mm for a young male and 6 mm for an older woman. Doesn't sound very scientific to me….I'm skinny and have no muscles at the moment so……?

Well, since I haven't read the book(s) I don't know if you can use the same needle (size?) and syringe for withdrawing and injecting 3-10 ml of blood.


Does the book say anything about HOW to do it, I mean practical things like needle/syringe sizes, exactly where in the buttocks etc?

How does the blood come in contact with the air? The light I understand….It's not that I'm cheap or lazy to read the books, I just have a really hard time to read things nowadays, even writing this.

I think my nurse friend will help me, but in worst case I might have to do it myself, or with my partners help, that's the reason for asking.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Well, since I haven't read the book(s) I don't know if you can use the same needle (size?) and syringe for withdrawing and injecting 3-10 ml of blood.


Does the book say anything about HOW to do it, I mean practical things like needle/syringe sizes, exactly where in the buttocks etc?

How does the blood come in contact with the air? The light I understand….It's not that I'm cheap or lazy to read the books, I just have a really hard time to read things nowadays, even writing this.

I think my nurse friend will help me, but in worst case I might have to do it myself, or with my partners help, that's the reason for asking.
Yes, you draw the blood out and inject it back in with same syringe and needle. And of course, you do a good alcohol wipe before each and have a bandage to put on immediately after you finish the draw.

The blood is in contact with air and light as it is drawn out of the arm into the syringe. If you want to be fancy, you could even have a fancy light shining down on it as you do it. There is no way to get all the air out of the syringe before you start drawing it out. But then, before re-injecting it, you hold it up in the light, tap it and get the air bubbles to the top and push them out. Then, smack the fanny and in she goes! The smack is important because it occupies the nerves at the injection site and if you go in immediately, you don't even feel it. It is about a minute that the blood is outside the body in the syringe and that seems to be all it takes.

Buttocks: Expose one side of the buttocks. With an alcohol wipe draw a line from the top of the crack between the buttocks to the side of the body. Find the middle of that line and go up 3 inches. From that point, draw another line down and across the first line, ending about halfway down the buttock. You should have drawn a cross. In the upper outer square you will feel a curved bone. The injection will go in the upper outer square below the curved bone. Do not use this site for infants or children younger than 3 years old. Their muscles are not developed enough.

1545326688690.png
I like mine a little lower, but not much. Putting it as described above pretty much guarantees that you'll miss anything you shouldn't hit which is important for skinny folks.
 
Top Bottom