Session 10 Aug 2019

Gruchaa

Jedi
There are generally three types of Jews, Mizrahi, Sephardic and Ashkenazi. Ashkenazis may be the descendants of Khazars.
I have found article like this on the topic:
the-scientist.com/daily-news/genetic-roots-of-the-ashkenazi-jews-38580

The majority of Ashkenazi Jews are descended from prehistoric European women, according to study published today (October 8) in Nature Communications. While the Jewish religion began in the Near East, and the Ashkenazi Jews were believed to have origins in the early indigenous tribes of this region, new evidence from mitochondrial DNA, which is passed on exclusively from mother to child, suggests that female ancestors of most modern Ashkenazi Jews converted to Judaism in the north Mediterranean around 2,000 years ago and later in west and central Europe

Looks like same thing what Laura wrote
 

Chu

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
There are several sites selling the filter/tuner bracelets, mostly out of Brazil. I'm going to wait for Laura and crew to refine the process and let us know how to proceed. It is very exciting, but can't go off half cocked without proper research and knowledge!
Yeah, that's not it at all. There is no bracelet, and I don't think you can buy them unless you have done the course, and directly from the founders of the system.

I've just contacted Marcel Vega via their contact form to ask when the next workshop is scheduled for Germany (since there was one in Berlin this spring). Let's see.
If you had asked here first, I would have recommended another route. First, we may try to organize something here if he is willing at some point. Second, you would be more likely to get a discount. Third, there were three non-Spanish speakers in the course, and they missed out on a lot of the explanations, because they only had google translate on the screen. The rest of us helped as much as we could, but it's not easy while you are paying attention, taking notes, etc. AFAIK, they have no interpreter working for them. So, I would check that there is an arrangement made in that direction before singing up.
 

Aiming

The Living Force
Yeah, that's not it at all. There is no bracelet, and I don't think you can buy them unless you have done the course, and directly from the founders of the system.



If you had asked here first, I would have recommended another route. First, we may try to organize something here if he is willing at some point. Second, you would be more likely to get a discount. Third, there were three non-Spanish speakers in the course, and they missed out on a lot of the explanations, because they only had google translate on the screen. The rest of us helped as much as we could, but it's not easy while you are paying attention, taking notes, etc. AFAIK, they have no interpreter working for them. So, I would check that there is an arrangement made in that direction before singing up.
Alrighty, makes sense, then I'll just wait for what's going to develop with the route you've suggested. Thanks for the heads-up, Chu.
 

Dirgni

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
There's just almost no way to describe it; you have to see it. And then, you have to try it yourself with someone walking you through the steps. Otherwise, it just looks like someone waving their hand around in the air around your body holding what looks like a small magnifying glass. Intermittantly, they wave the little glass around over other little glass things, or pictures, or sheets of paper with words or numbers written on them. When I first saw it done, I thought "wow, that looks like some kind of shaman waving stuff around somebody's body to get rid of evil spirits!" You know, like feathers, bones, rattles, etc. But actually, the movements of the practitioner's hand are rather precise and the use of different tuners is part of the process.
I hope I will see it done one day and learn more about it. It seems to be helpful like NO but in another manner.

The waving with hands over a body reminds me doing Reiki in another way. Sometimes I connected with Reiki and "waved" with my hands "in the air" a few decimeters over the body of someone (who agreed). At some places I felt the person pulling Reiki energy strongly. Then I put my hands on these body parts, which seemed to need Reiki at that time. This is real. But when someone seeing this from the outside, this someone may think this is some shaman stuff or even think it is "hocus pocus".
 

marek760

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Thank you all for another fascinating session

Q: (Artemis) Is there an optimal time for people to pray?

A: Early morning before dawn.

Q: (L) Just before, or as the sun rises?

A: Yes

Q: (Artemis) Why is that time preferable?

A: Energy of Earth has quieted and there is a gap just before the energy of the sun returns.

Q: (L) So there's like a gap that you can escape through into the cosmos.

(Artemis) So it's kind of like the internet. When everyone's sleeping, the internet is faster!

A: Yes
Interesting, I don't know if it has any connection but I sometimes wake up before sunrise, and I'm usuallyI going to sleep again. , then I have the most clear and vivid dreams that I remember.
 
There were also two big killing incidents in Croatia and Serbia this month:
There was a recent gruesome prison riot in northern Brazil that already has its own Wikipedia page. These very nasty riots with beheadings occur from time to time but this one might fit the latest wave of negative energy.

The Altamira prison riot occurred on 29 July 2019, when a riot broke out at the Centro de Recuperação Regional de Altamira prison in Altamira, Pará, Brazil, due to drug turf disputes between rival gangs within the prison.

Over the five-hour conflict, 62 people died. Sixteen people were beheaded, and a fire lit at the beginning of the riot killed 46 more people due to smoke inhalation.
 

GRiM

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Very interesting!

I wonder if you can use this technique on a group of people instead of one at a time, like a orchestra compared to a single instrument. Not sure if its useful but just a idea that stuck me.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Very interesting!

I wonder if you can use this technique on a group of people instead of one at a time, like a orchestra compared to a single instrument. Not sure if its useful but just a idea that stuck me.
Well, I dunno. It might be worth trying though I think you would have to work with a photo or a list of names and birthdays.

Also, apparently, you can do this technique long distance.
 

Adaryn

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I have found article like this on the topic:
the-scientist.com/daily-news/genetic-roots-of-the-ashkenazi-jews-38580

The majority of Ashkenazi Jews are descended from prehistoric European women, according to study published today (October 8) in Nature Communications. While the Jewish religion began in the Near East, and the Ashkenazi Jews were believed to have origins in the early indigenous tribes of this region, new evidence from mitochondrial DNA, which is passed on exclusively from mother to child, suggests that female ancestors of most modern Ashkenazi Jews converted to Judaism in the north Mediterranean around 2,000 years ago and later in west and central Europe.
The whole issue about the origins of the Ashkenazi is quite muddy, and the subject of controversy. The claim that they mostly descend from Khazarian converts was supposedly debunked a few years ago, following the latest DNA research into Ashkenazi genetics. Of course, it fits the Zionist agenda to claim and find "genetic evidence" of a very ancient Middle-Eastern origin.

From the above article (2013):

The new findings contradict previous assertions that Ashkenazi mitochondrial lineages originated in the Near East, or from mass conversions to Judaism in the Khazar kingdom, an empire in the north Caucasus region between Europe and Asia lasting from the 7th century to the 11th century whose leaders adopted Judaism. “We found that most of the maternal lineages don’t trace to the north Caucasus, which would be a proxy for the Khazarians, or to the Near East, but most of them emanate from Europe,” said coauthor Martin Richards, an archaeogeneticist at the University of Huddersfield in the U.K.

Richards and colleagues’ story “seems reasonable,” said Harry Ostrer, a human geneticist at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York City who was not involved in the study. “It certainly fits with what we understand about Jewish history.”

The Ashkenazi Jews make up the majority of Jews today and most recently have ancestry in central or Eastern Europe. Previous work has demonstrated that just four mitochondrial types, pass down from four mothers, account for 40 percent of variation in Ashkenazi Jews’ mitochondrial DNA, and some researchers have published evidence of Near Eastern origins for these Ashkenazi mitochondrial types.

To further investigate the matrilineal lines of the Ashkenazi Jews, Richards and colleagues looked at mitochondrial genome sequences in living Jews and non-Jews from the Near East, Europe, and the Caucasus. Based on the results, the team concluded that, in contrast to the evidence for many Ashkenazi males, whose Y chromosomal DNA suggests a likely origin in the Near East, the female lineage of Ashkenazi Jews have substantial ancestry in Europe. Specifically, the researchers found that the four main Ashkenazi founder mitochondrial types were nested within European mitochondrial lineages, not Near Eastern ones, and an analysis of more minor haplogroups indicated that an additional 40 percent of mitochondrial variation found in Ashkenazi Jews’ mitochondrial DNA was likely of European origin. The remaining variants appeared to be from the Near East or are of uncertain origin, and there was no evidence for Ashkenazi Jewish origins in the Khazar kingdom, according to the authors.

Historical evidence indicates that Jewish communities began to spread into Europe during classical antiquity and migrated north during the first millennium CE, arriving in the Rhineland by the 12th century. Local European women could have begun to join the Jewish population around 2,000 years ago or earlier, Richards and colleagues suggest, and the Ashkenazis may have continued to recruit additional women as they headed north.

But some scientists question these conclusions. “While it is clear that Ashkenazi maternal ancestry includes both Levantine [Near Eastern] and European origins—the assignment of several of the major Ashkenazi lineages to pre-historic European origin in the current study is incorrect in our view,” physician-geneticists Doron Behar and Karl Skorecki of the Rambam Healthcare Campus in Israel, whose previous work indicated a Near Eastern origins to many Ashkenazi mitochondrial types, wrote in an e-mail to The Scientist. They argue that the mitochondrial DNA data used in the new study did not represent the full spectrum of mitochondrial diversity.

Eran Elhaik, a research associate studying genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, is split. He agreed with the study authors that the study rules out a Near Eastern origin for many mitochondrial lineages of the Ashkenazis but disagreed that it rules out a Khazarian contribution. “Jews and non-Jews residing in the regions of Khazaria are underrepresented, which biases the results toward Europe as we have seen in many other studies,” he said in an e-mail to The Scientist. Elhaik recently concluded from autosomal DNA that European Jews did, in fact, have a Khazarian background.

David Goldstein, a geneticist and director of the Center for Human Genome Variation at the Duke University School of Medicine, said that the questions of whether there was a Khazar contribution to the Ashkenazi Jews’ lineage, or exactly what percentage of mitochondrial variants emanate from Europe, cannot be answered with certainty using present genetic and geographical data. Even if a set of variants are present in a specific region today, that doesn’t mean that the region always had that set of variants. Some variants could have been lost due to drift, or perhaps migration altered the balance of variants present in the population.

“These analyses really do not have any formal statistical inference about evolutionary history in them,” Goldstein wrote in an e-mail to The Scientist. “They are based on direct interpretations of where one finds different [mitochondrial DNA] types today. And so the analyses are largely impressionistic.”

Nevertheless, Goldstein noted that the new study “does offer better resolution of the [mitochondrial DNA] than earlier ones, and so the suggested interpretation could well be right.”
From a more recent article (2018):

For a more scientific take on the Jewish origin debate, recent DNA analysis of Ashkenazic Jews – a Jewish ethnic group – revealed that their maternal line is European. It has also been found that their DNA only has 3% ancient ancestry which links them with the Eastern Mediterranean (also known as the Middle East) – namely Israel, Lebanon, parts of Syria, and western Jordan. This is the part of the world Jewish people are said to have originally come from – according to the Old Testament. But 3% is a minuscule amount, and similar to what modern Europeans as a whole share with Neanderthals. So given that the genetic ancestry link is so low, Ashkenazic Jews’ most recent ancestors must be from elsewhere.

To understand why this is the case, we need to go back in time, to look at where these other ancestors came from. It starts in Persia (modern-day Iran) during the sixth century. This is where most of the world’s Jews were living at this time.

The tolerance of the Persians encouraged the Jews to adopt Persian names, words, traditions, and religious practices, and climb up the social ladder gaining a monopoly on trade. They also converted other people who were living along the Black Sea, to their Jewish faith. This helped to expand their global network.

Among these converts were the Alans (Iranian nomadic pastoral people), Greeks, and Slavs who resided along the southern shores of the Black Sea. Upon conversion, they translated the Old Testament into Greek, built synagogues, and continued expanding the Jewish trade network.



DNA of Yiddish speakers could have originated from four ancient villages in northwest Turkey.Author provided

These Jews adopted the name Ashkenaz, and the DNA of Ashkenazic Jews can be traced to “Ancient Ashkenaz” – an intersection of trade routes in eastern Turkey.

The rise of the Ashina
We now know that at the time these Jews adopted the name Ashkenaz, they also acquired unique Asian mutations on their Y chromosome. This is where another important group of people in our story come into play – and they are called the Gok-Turks.

During the sixth century, these nomadic people were ruled by a Siberian Turkic tribe called the Ashina. They were forced by the Chinese Tang Empire – who were in power in China at the time – to migrate westwards toward the Black Sea.

Thanks to their organisational and military skills, the Ashina united many tribes in this area – and a new empire called the “Khazar Khaganate” was born. Offering freedom of worship and taxing trade, these people quickly rose to power.

The Asian group of these DNA mutations, found in Ashkenazic Jews, likely originated from the Ashina elite and other Khazar clans, who converted from Shamanism to Judaism. This means that the Ashina and core Khazar clans were absorbed by the Ashkenazic Jews.

It was also around this time that the Jewish elite adopted many Slavic customs. And based on my previous research, I would suggest that Yiddish was developed as a secret language to assist in trade.

The next chapter
What happened next was that the Jewish empire began to collapse. By the tenth century, the Jews on the Black Sea migrated to Ukraine and Italy. Yiddish became the lingua franca of these Ashkenazic Jews and absorbed German words while maintaining the Slavic grammar. And as global trade moved to the hands of the Italians, Dutch and English, the Jews were pushed aside.

What this all shows is that by using modern genetic technology – that enables scientists to track the past of modern-day people – a new appreciation for Jewish ancestry can be discovered.

It has meant a greater understanding of the journeys these people took to arrive in Europe. It has also allowed for increased knowledge as to the significant role the Ashina and the Khazar clans – from which some of the real Jewish patriarchs actually came from – played.
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