Smoking is... good?

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hello,

I found these notices while reading the book:


In record 107, it says:

Considering that the last movement to try to impose a global pathocracy, Nazism, vigorously campaigned against cigarettes by claiming that it represents a danger to health, while generously spreading depleted uranium (a substance much more dangerous) in the environment, and refused to join any environmental conservation activity, one may wonder if there is not some connection here. If carbon monoxide, one of the main substances inhaled when you smoke, causes a condition or condition that protects against mental damage from pathocrats, then it's no wonder they want to eliminate it. It also suggests that the alleged data in support of anti-smoking campaigns may have been fabricated.


In record 108, it says:

That is to say second hand smoke. It would mean in fact that second hand smoke or passive smoking could have highly beneficial effects on children, especially immunizing them against psychopathic control.

Personally, I started smoking cigarillo. I had trouble having a bowel movement. Since I smoke, I have no more difficulty.

Note: I used google translate for the translation. I am French Canadian and I am not 100% bilingual.

Thank you.

Marc.
What do you mean by "record"? the page?
 

trytofly

Jedi
I use this site to buy fairgreen tobacco, prices are excellent and its organic. They also do mohauk and sauvage tobacco and are additive free and American spirit organic tobacco and cigarettes . I'm sure they deliver to the UK aswell.

They only sell American spirit were I live it's 17.50e for 25 gram pouch. I get 30 gram pouch of Fairgreen for 6.50e on that site. Have been using them for over a year now, no issues at all.

Here is the link for American spirit cigarettes.

Thank you for the link !
It is increasingly difficult to be able to order tobacco abroad from France. One by one, the sites that previously allowed it, no longer deliver to France. I went through several Belgian sites before finding Tabak Brucker and what became my favorite Manitou / fairgreen tobacco. Unfortunately, it also seems to be over:
"Tobacco abroad
The shopping cart contains tobacco products which, for reasons of tobacco tax law, may only be shipped within Germany. "
 

liam1310

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Thank you for the link !
It is increasingly difficult to be able to order tobacco abroad from France. One by one, the sites that previously allowed it, no longer deliver to France. I went through several Belgian sites before finding Tabak Brucker and what became my favorite Manitou / fairgreen tobacco. Unfortunately, it also seems to be over:
"Tobacco abroad
The shopping cart contains tobacco products which, for reasons of tobacco tax law, may only be shipped within Germany. "

Unfortunately they no longer sell fairgreen also my favourite tobacco. Its getting more difficult to get good tobacco, how they are still able to deliver abroad when others are not, i've no idea. Hopefully it continues, cigars on that site are cheaper than most i've seen online as well.
 

Turgon

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I was wondering but has anyone come across anything connecting smoking to the prevention or mitigation of asthmatic symptoms? I’ve noticed the last few years that anytime I go a day or two without smoking I start to develop a wheezing while breathing, a dry cough that sounds worse than it is, sometimes my lungs feel like they are on fire, shortness of breathe and an overall feeling of not being able to take in enough oxygen. I’ll even develop pins and needles in my extremities and this feeling of panic that comes with it. Usually if I’m able to settle my horses down and find a way to ground my attention and not get swept away by it, can stave off the symptoms but recently a friend checked my meridian points and without even being prompted asked if I’ve been diagnosed with any lung problems. Of course, the easiest way of dealing with this is by having a smoke every once in a while, and have started supplementing with NAC again, but am wondering if this is indicative of some underlying issue that needs to be addressed.
 

Matthew

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I was wondering but has anyone come across anything connecting smoking to the prevention or mitigation of asthmatic symptoms? I’ve noticed the last few years that anytime I go a day or two without smoking I start to develop a wheezing while breathing, a dry cough that sounds worse than it is, sometimes my lungs feel like they are on fire, shortness of breathe and an overall feeling of not being able to take in enough oxygen. I’ll even develop pins and needles in my extremities and this feeling of panic that comes with it. Usually if I’m able to settle my horses down and find a way to ground my attention and not get swept away by it, can stave off the symptoms but recently a friend checked my meridian points and without even being prompted asked if I’ve been diagnosed with any lung problems. Of course, the easiest way of dealing with this is by having a smoke every once in a while, and have started supplementing with NAC again, but am wondering if this is indicative of some underlying issue that needs to be addressed.

Not long after I started smoking I stopped using the steroid inhaler that I take for asthma. I started by accident because I forgot to take it for a day or two but when I realised it just felt right that I should continue to not take it. I thought I would give it a few days and go back on it if I had any issues. Weeks later and I am still off it and I can't remember the last time I had to use my normal inhaler. Whether the smoking has anything to do with that or whether it's because I've been getting much more fresh air recently or something else there is no way of telling but there you are.
 

Keyhole

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I was wondering but has anyone come across anything connecting smoking to the prevention or mitigation of asthmatic symptoms? I’ve noticed the last few years that anytime I go a day or two without smoking I start to develop a wheezing while breathing, a dry cough that sounds worse than it is, sometimes my lungs feel like they are on fire, shortness of breathe and an overall feeling of not being able to take in enough oxygen. I’ll even develop pins and needles in my extremities and this feeling of panic that comes with it. Usually if I’m able to settle my horses down and find a way to ground my attention and not get swept away by it, can stave off the symptoms but recently a friend checked my meridian points and without even being prompted asked if I’ve been diagnosed with any lung problems. Of course, the easiest way of dealing with this is by having a smoke every once in a while, and have started supplementing with NAC again, but am wondering if this is indicative of some underlying issue that needs to be addressed.

In Asthma, a key problem is that glutathione (the primary antioxidant) is depleted or in its oxidized form. A disruption of other intracellular antioxidants such as catalase and superoxide dismutase also plays a role. This renders cells hypersensitive to environmental antigens, oxidative stress and inflammation:

Glutathione Redox Control of Asthma: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

There is also a growing body of literature implicating disturbances in oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions and impaired antioxidant defenses as a risk factor for asthma development and asthma severity. Ultimately, these redox-related perturbations result in a vicious cycle of airway inflammation and injury that is not always amenable to current asthma therapy, particularly in cases of severe asthma.

While the specific mechanisms responsible for asthma have yet to be unraveled, oxidative stress from free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is likely to play a key role in the development and pathogenesis of the disorder. ROS and RNS contribute to airway inflammation and increased concentrations of both ROS and RNS have been observed in the airways of asthmatic individuals (54). Importantly, these ROS and RNS can lead to oxidation and nitration of proteins important for the resolution of inflammation.

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While the specific mechanisms underlying asthma have yet to be identified, there is accumulating evidence that oxidative stress from altered GSH/GSSG redox status may play an important role in the modulation and severity of the disorder. In more severe patients in whom airway GSH reserves are depleted, this may result in a detrimental cascade with a shift toward GSSG formation and oxidation of thioredoxins, leading to post-translational protein modifications through oxidation of protein-methionine residues and formation of protein disulfides from glutathionylation or other mechanisms (Fig. 16). Ultimately, these disturbances may render the functional activity of other glutathione-related enzymes insufficient and increase susceptibility to oxidant-induced airway injury.

One treatment which is generally effective for asthma is nebulized glutathione for this reason. NAC is going to exert an anti-mucous type of action along with acting as a precursor for glutathione synthesis.

In the context of tobacco smoking, I wrote an article for SOTT some years ago which details a few of the mechanisms of action in the lung which could help to explain why tobacco can benefit asthma.

On glutathione:
Interestingly, smokers' lungs have been found to contain 80% more glutathione than the lungs of non-smokers.22

Higher concentrations of glutathione in the lungs offer increased levels of protection against foreign material and pathogenic agents. What these findings suggest is that smoking tobacco may actually have a protective effect on lung tissue by up-regulating glutathione levels, however the mechanism behind this up-regulation was not covered in this particular study. Another experiment23, however, sought to directly measure glutathione's response to tobacco smoke and here's what they found:

"CS [cigarette smoke] exposure initially decreased ELF GSH [glutathione] levels by 50% but within 2 hours, GSH levels rebound to about 3 times basal levels and peaked at 16 hours with a 6-fold increase and over repeat exposures were maintained at a 3-fold elevation for up to 2 months.

CS exposures evoke a powerful GSH adaptive response in the lung and systemically.
[...] Factors that disrupt GSH adaptive responses may contribute to the pathophysiology of COPD."

On catalase and superoxide dismutase:

Much like glutathione, catalase and SOD also appear to be controlled by some kind of antioxidant "adaptive response". A recent study24 found that "Superoxide dismutase enzyme levels in the blood and saliva were significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers and the controls". Furthermore, it was also discovered - in a separate experiment25 - that tobacco smoke-exposed hamsters were shown to have roughly double the amount of both Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase than hamsters who were not exposed to smoke.

The increase in glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase may partly be able to explain how tobacco smoke manages to prevent lung cancer in those inhalling radiation, exhaust fumes and asbestos. Such an increase in antioxidant activity could be the key factor that protects lung tissue and rids the body of any nasty toxins inhaled via the respiratory tract.

On low-dose carbon monoxide:

Fortunately for smokers, there is now a growing body of evidence demonstrating carbon monoxide's potent hormetic effects and potential therapeutic benefits. Researchers at the Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology department of research at the University of Kyoto, Japan, say:26
Recent accumulating evidence has suggested that carbon monoxide (CO) may act as an endogenous defensive gaseous molecule to reduce inflammation and tissue injury in various organ injury models, including intestinal inflammation.

...Potent therapeutic efficacies of CO have been demonstrated in experimental models of several conditions, including lung injuries, heart, hepatic and renal I-R injuries, as well as inflammation, including arthritis, supporting the new paradigm that CO at low concentrations functions as a signaling molecule that exerts significant cytoprotection and anti-inflammatory actions.

On anti-inflammation:
The paper13 'Nicotine, an anti-inflammation molecule' deals with this topic extensively, explaining that "nicotine stimulation plays a key role in suppressing inflammatory cytokine production, can significantly down-regulate and delay inflammatory and autoimmune responses in the central nervous system, and could further attenuate neuro-inflammation. Nicotine-treated mice injected with lethal doses of influenza A virus infection also displayed longer survival rates when compared to control groups." The author finally states:
"These in vitro and in vivo results further confirmed the anti-inflammatory effect of nicotine. Our study offered the first evidence that the anti-inflammatory effect of nicotine in cigarette smoke might be the key contributor for the alleviation of the disease severity of both pdmH1N1 and H9N2 influenza A virus infection, and such anti-inflammatory effect was through the α7 nAChR signaling pathway.

In summary, asthmatics appear to have altered redox status (excessive oxidation) of antioxidants in the lungs and probably systemically. Smoking acts as a minor stressor, which sends a signal to the cells to upregulate the production of antioxidants. The net result is a "hormetic" effect, whereby glutathione levels are boosted as well as other antioxidant enzymes. It also appears to play a role in inflammation, to dampen excessive immune responses.

Aside from NAC, you could look at trying nebulized glutathione if you can get hold of it and 5 grams of glycine per day (along with NAC) to act as a second glutathione precursor. Hope that helps to answer your question!
 

Nienna

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I have asthma and a friend told me that long ago when her father first got asthma, his doctor told him that he should start smoking. So at 58 years old, I started smoking. I, also, have heard from my asthma doctor (who is against smoking) that smoking lessens or even hides allergy responses.

I've wondered, off and on, if the smoking was really helping me because, unlike Mattew, I still need my steroid puffer. But, then, everyone's different and responds differently to various things. What I found out is that if I don't smoke, everything becomes worse like my lungs and sinuses. So smoking does help me to a certain degree. And it's enough of a "degree" that I continue to smoke because of the benefits. Also, any pains I have disappear for a while.
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Interesting, and thanks for the info regarding asthma. I sometimes get shortness of breath, which seemed to accompany drinking water. I thought it could be the salt or that the lids on my jars were somewhat rusty? And I can get out of breath when doing moderate exercise and I will stop and then finish up the repetitions.

I've thought about trying smoking again, not fitting the profile as it has always been work for me. I bought some loose tobacco for the COVID situation, not having realized that it may be beneficial to actually acquire the virus. But this has me pondering whether I might try again. Maybe my DNA has changed some? Pipes are interesting and it would be cool (literally) to try a churchwarden because I've always smoked them too fast and hot. But rolled cigarettes are less maintenance and cleanup.
 

Matthew

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I have asthma and a friend told me that long ago when her father first got asthma, his doctor told him that he should start smoking. So at 58 years old, I started smoking. I, also, have heard from my asthma doctor (who is against smoking) that smoking lessens or even hides allergy responses.

I've wondered, off and on, if the smoking was really helping me because, unlike Mattew, I still need my steroid puffer. But, then, everyone's different and responds differently to various things. What I found out is that if I don't smoke, everything becomes worse like my lungs and sinuses. So smoking does help me to a certain degree. And it's enough of a "degree" that I continue to smoke because of the benefits. Also, any pains I have disappear for a while.

I should clarify that I do not have asthma as such but 'asthma-like symptoms due to allergic reaction'. This was diagnosed 2 or 3 years ago when I was having difficulty breathing that got so bad that I could barely get any breath and each breath took great physical effort. If that is what true asthmatics go through when they have an attack then they have my sympathy as it is alarming, to say the least! After I had a breath test to ascertain the state of my lungs I was told that I had the lungs of a man in his mid-60s so 10-15 years older than I actually am. So they put me on the steroid inhaler too.

Interesting, and thanks for the info regarding asthma. I sometimes get shortness of breath, which seemed to accompany drinking water. I thought it could be the salt or that the lids on my jars were somewhat rusty? And I can get out of breath when doing moderate exercise and I will stop and then finish up the repetitions.

I've thought about trying smoking again, not fitting the profile as it has always been work for me. I bought some loose tobacco for the COVID situation, not having realized that it may be beneficial to actually acquire the virus. But this has me pondering whether I might try again. Maybe my DNA has changed some? Pipes are interesting and it would be cool (literally) to try a churchwarden because I've always smoked them too fast and hot. But rolled cigarettes are less maintenance and cleanup.

Have you considered chewing tobacco or snuff? I tried the former and didn't really like it but I really like snuff. It really makes my brain tingle i.e. I can physically feel my brain tingle in my skull. Also, I am pretty sure that it has cognitive benefits as I feel sharper and more 'with it' after taking some. Nicotine does have this effect though as many articles on SOTT have pointed out.
 

cope

Jedi Master
Dr Mercola, a cigarette hater pur sang, could not find much ammunition against smoking in relation to Covid, but vaping seems to be problematic.
Conventional Smokers Not at Increased Risk?
In hot countries, for each percentage point increase in smoking rate mortality decreased by .147 per 100,000 population. This resulted in mortality rates several-fold elevated in the countries with the lowest smoking rates relative to the highest smoking rates. In the combined group, mortality decreased by .257 per 100,000 population.
These findings add support to the finding of an inverse relationship between current smoking and seriously symptomatic COVID-19. However, we conclude that the difference in mortality between the highest and lowest smoking countries appears too large to be due primarily to the effects of smoking per se.
Studies show smoking alters ACE2 expression which may affect COVID-19 infection or its progression to serious lung pathology.

Nicotine has anti-inflammatory activity and also appears to alter ACE2 expression.
Nitric oxide in cigarette smoke is known to be effective in treating pulmonary hypertension and has shown in vitro antiviral effects including against SARS-CoV-2.
Smoking has complicated effects on the immune system involving both up and down regulation, any of which might alone or in concert antagonize progression of COVID-19.
Smokers are exposed to hot vapors which may stimulate immunity in the respiratory tract by various heat-related mechanisms (e.g. heat shock proteins)."

He has some cognitive dissonance:
Curiously, as indicated by several of the studies cited earlier, the Stanford study again found no connection between COVID-19 diagnosis and the smoking of conventional cigarettes alone. It remains to be seen whether a conclusive answer will be found to these questions.
An earlier meta-analysis, published in May 2020, which reviewed five different studies, also failed to find a link between conventional smoking and COVID-19 severity.
Overall, I believe it's reasonable to assume that all forms of smoking will ultimately harm your lungs and cardiovascular system to some degree, and increase your risk of infections of all kinds, including SARS-CoV-2.

But ex-smokers do have some extra risk, so don't stop...:lol:
 
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anartist

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
Just came across this in my search for ways to dissolve my lung blood clot.
Transient Expression of Lumbrokinase (PI239) in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Using a Geminivirus-Based Single Replicon System Dissolves Fibrin and Blood Clots
Alexia Dickey 1 , Nan Wang 2 , Edwin Cooper 3 , Lauren Tull 1 , Drew Breedlove 1 , Hugh Mason 4 , Dehu Liu 2 , Kevin Yueju Wang 1

Affiliations
Abstract
Lumbrokinases, a group of fibrinolytic enzymes extracted from earthworm, have been widely used to prevent and treat various cardiovascular diseases. They specifically target fibrin to effectively degrade thrombi without major side effects. Plant expression systems are becoming potential alternative expression platforms for producing pharmaceutical proteins. In this work, a lumbrokinase (PI239) was produced from a plant system. Both wild-type (WT) and plant codon-optimized (OP) PI239 gene sequences were synthesized and cloned into a geminivirus-based single-vector DNA replicon system. Both vectors were independently expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves transiently by agroinfiltration. Overexpressed PI239 resulted in sudden tissue necrosis 3 days after infiltration. Remaining proteins were purified through His-tag affinity chromatography and analyzed with SDS-PAGE and Western blot methods. Purified PI239 successfully degraded artificial fibrin with relative activity of 13,400 U/mg when compared with commercial lumbrokinase product. In vitro tests demonstrated that plant-derived PI239 dissolved human blood clots and that the plant expression system is capable of producing functional PI239.

Sounds like a bit of genetic engineering, but I am curious as to why they chose tobacco? Was ther something in tobacco that aided the expression of the lumbrokinase?
 
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