Thiamine (Vitamin B1) - A common deficiency in disorders of energy metabolism, cardiovascular and nervous system dysfunction

monotonic

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
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And not only does pathway this supply reducing power to regenerate glutathione,
Edit: Oops, I see you already found that one.
 

Cristal

Padawan Learner
Thank you @Keyhole for this Thiamine thread. I was wondering if it's allowed to give it to small children(mine is 2 1/2years old) . I found a cream, called Authia Cream by Strata Dermatologics, that has allithiamine and B12. (transdermal). It's mostly used for autistic children, but seeing how important allithiamine is and with the EMF and air and water pollution we have to deal with every day, maybe small children might benefit from it...
The ingredients are: Deionized water‚ thiamin tetrahydrofurfuryl disulfide (Vitamin B1) 50 mg/ml‚ PEG-100 stearate‚ glyceryl stearate‚ propylene glycol‚ glycerin‚ isopropyl myristate‚ dimethyl sulfone‚ carthamus tinctorius (safflower) seed oil‚ lecithin‚ dimethicone‚ cetearyl alcohol‚ ceteareth-20‚ diazolidinyl urea‚ carbomer‚ triethanolamine‚ methylcobalamin (Vitamin B12) 500mcg/ml‚ citrus medica limonum (lemon) peel oil‚ phenoxyethanol‚ benzyl alcohol‚ azelaic acid‚ thioctic acid‚ carnosine‚ disodium EDTA‚ ethoxydiglycol.
Paraben-Free.
What do you think?
 

Ageeva

Padawan Learner
I've been doing a lot of research on Thiamine deficiency in the past two weeks including all the brilliant work @Keyhole has been doing on this vital nutrient these past couple of years. Thank you very much. Reading the research has made me realise I've been having a lot of the symptoms typical of Thiamine deficiency; chronic physical and mental fatigue, neurosis, bouts of insomnia, exercise intolerance, anxiety, heat intolerance and feeling of being disconnected, as well as bouts of constipation and calf muscle cramping. I've started taking 50 mg of Thiamine, but only the HCl form, as well as Magnesium Malate 200 mg, Vit C 1000g (Lipsomal at the moment but I intend to get Ascorbic Acid and take a higher dose), Vit D3 5000 mg and a good multivitamin and mineral supplement. However, I hope to start with TTFD soon when it arrives and I'll report on my progress. I've also been reading through the thread on Iodine and intend to try that in the near future (it's a long thread so it'll take a while) but considering a lot of my symptoms are pointing to Thiamine deficiency I've decided to concentrate on that for now. As regards diet I'm working on reducing my carb intake, I've always been an avid carnivore (Rib eye steak is my favourite, the fattier steak:-)) but due to my symptoms I've been reaching for the carbs too much.
Even on the Thiamine HCl I've noticed some improvement, so I'm looking forward to supplementing on the TTFD as it crosses the BBB. I'm pretty sure it'll give me the mental focus for dietary and lifestyle changes.
 

Ursus Minor

Jedi Council Member
I've been doing a lot of research on Thiamine deficiency in the past two weeks including all the brilliant work @Keyhole has been doing on this vital nutrient these past couple of years. Thank you very much. Reading the research has made me realise I've been having a lot of the symptoms typical of Thiamine deficiency; chronic physical and mental fatigue, neurosis, bouts of insomnia, exercise intolerance, anxiety, heat intolerance and feeling of being disconnected, as well as bouts of constipation and calf muscle cramping. I've started taking 50 mg of Thiamine, but only the HCl form, as well as Magnesium Malate 200 mg, Vit C 1000g (Lipsomal at the moment but I intend to get Ascorbic Acid and take a higher dose), Vit D3 5000 mg and a good multivitamin and mineral supplement. However, I hope to start with TTFD soon when it arrives and I'll report on my progress. I've also been reading through the thread on Iodine and intend to try that in the near future (it's a long thread so it'll take a while) but considering a lot of my symptoms are pointing to Thiamine deficiency I've decided to concentrate on that for now. As regards diet I'm working on reducing my carb intake, I've always been an avid carnivore (Rib eye steak is my favourite, the fattier steak:-)) but due to my symptoms I've been reaching for the carbs too much.
Even on the Thiamine HCl I've noticed some improvement, so I'm looking forward to supplementing on the TTFD as it crosses the BBB. I'm pretty sure it'll give me the mental focus for dietary and lifestyle changes.

Thank you for your input, Ageeva.

Concerning physical and mental fatigue I have resorted to a Vitamin B combination supplement ('B complex plus' by 'pure encapsulations').
It contains 100 mg of Thiamine HCI (B 1), 100 mg of Niacinamide (B 3), 100 mg of pantothenic acid (B 5), 10 mg of Inositol (B 3), P-5-P (activated B 6), Riboflavin-5-phosphate (activated B 2) each and 5 mg of Riboflavin (B 2).
Further you get 400 mcg each of biotin, folate and methylcobalamin (B 12).

This combination saves me from swallowing all these supplements consecutively.

In addition I'm taking Magnesium bisglycinate (150 mg), Vitamin D 3 (250 mcg/ 10,000 units) every four days.
BTW: Are you sure you're taking 5,000 mg of D 3?

Judging from my own experience I'd say that neurotic symptoms and anxiety do not always derive from supplemental deficiencies.

I'm also taking 30mg of zinc every couple of days and probiotics daily.
 

Ageeva

Padawan Learner
Concerning physical and mental fatigue I have resorted to a Vitamin B combination supplement ('B complex plus' by 'pure encapsulations').
It contains 100 mg of Thiamine HCI (B 1), 100 mg of Niacinamide (B 3), 100 mg of pantothenic acid (B 5), 10 mg of Inositol (B 3), P-5-P (activated B 6), Riboflavin-5-phosphate (activated B 2) each and 5 mg of Riboflavin (B 2).
Further you get 400 mcg each of biotin, folate and methylcobalamin (B 12).
Hi @Ursus Minor. I had a look at the Pure Encapsulations website and it's certainly a much better and purer option than the Nutri Advanced brand I'm using at the moment. I would like to switch to TTFD form of Thiamine for its better BBB penetration though.
n addition I'm taking Magnesium bisglycinate (150 mg), Vitamin D 3 (250 mcg/ 10,000 units) every four days.
BTW: Are you sure you're taking 5,000 mg of D 3?
I haven't been able to get up to date yet on the Magnesium thread and I've noticed Magnesium biglycinate mentioned in posts since my last time on the forum when Magnesium Malate was considered a good bioavailable form. So I'll have a look on the Magnesium thread and check the information on Magnesium biglysinate.
Regarding Vitamin D3, my error, it's of course 5000IU (about 125 mcg?) :-[:-)
Judging from my own experience I'd say that neurotic symptoms and anxiety do not always derive from supplemental deficiencies
This is something I want to look more at. The supplementation was really to give a boost to my mental focus and energy while I look at the psyche, diet and other factors. I hope to do so in the Swamp and other threads soon.
Thanks for the feedback.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've been thinking that the depressive state that comes with bad food and malnutrition might come from the brain subconsciously, but correctly perceiving that it is at a universal disadvantage (and how we react to that subconscious state determines the remainder of the equation). And then we seem to have this cultural or programmed blind spot where we identify cognitive or physical ailment as an emotion or feeling rather than recognizing that strange mistakes are occurring in our thought process or in our bodies.

This is not an either/or situation as changing our diet and changing our mental state are both part of the solution. If you remedy either symptom you will still have the other to contend with.

If you get over the mental state and start taking actions you will suddenly become aware that you feel very bad physically.

If you fix the diet, you will discover that as soon as some slip up or ordinary illness comes along you will slide back into the same place mentally.

It's never perfectly symmetrical as either diet or internal cognitive situational awareness will be the larger issue just depending on your circumstances. Therefore you may find that after experiencing a good diet you will know how you should be thinking even if your diet puts you at a disadvantage. Or if you become aware of your thinking errors, you will be able to make good decisions despite being under dietary duress.

Example:

In childhood, your parents may fight and this overwhelms you with emotion. The stress causes you to develop stomach pain, but because you are overwhelmed you don't feel it as a symptom of sickness but as indistinguishable from the emotions you are feeling about your parents fighting. And from then ever after, every time you eat a carrot you get depressed because the stomach pain caused by the carrot is indistinguishable from the emotional pain you felt during childhood. I think for many people this process envelopes almost every experience they have of illness, and so they just don't realize how bad they feel and how it is affecting them.

If you merely stop eating carrots you will still have this emotional trigger from stomach pain that will incapacitate you to some degree and cause thinking errors.

If you somehow resolve your childhood feelings, you will still get stomach pain from eating carrots.

This is of course asymmetrical because in the latter case you will easily recognize that you shouldn't eat carrots, whereas in the first case the mental disadvantage makes it very difficult to recognize the pattern.


On the other hand let's say you have a severe nutritional deficiency. It comes and goes, but during some proportion of your life you are extremely lethargic. It takes a disproportionate amount of effort to do mundane things. You receive a box in the mail. You know you have to open the box, but somehow every step takes everything you have. Things which a normal person would do almost reflexively, like picking up the knife and cutting the tape, require from you micromanagement of every step and movement. You cut the tape across the top, and then linger in confusion until you realize you need to cut the sides as well to get the box to open. Just the effort of standing there and moving the box around has drained every last drop of interest you had in what was in the box. After cutting the tape you experience a surge of relief, and in that brief moment of distraction you feel that your work is done. "Man I'm depressed" you think to yourself. You walk away and collapse in the computer chair and begin looking up cat videos on Youtube. After a few hours you realize you still need to get to the box. And so the cycle continues.

Well in theory you could recognize your thinking errors and power through the fatigue. But that doesn't change the fact that you must do everything slowly, checking and double checking and still not catching all of your errors. And the fact is that a normal person could do in 5 minutes what takes you 5 hours. If this is your job, then you are going to lose it.

In this situation I think fixing the diet/nutrition is the priority. Thinking errors contribute, but it's also important not to destroy your pancreas. And if you focus too much on yourself you ignore the fact that others exist and are affected by your poor work, and that is ultimately selfish as well.
 
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Ursus Minor

Jedi Council Member
In childhood, your parents may fight and this overwhelms you with emotion. The stress causes you to develop stomach pain, but because you are overwhelmed you don't feel it as a symptom of sickness but as indistinguishable from the emotions you are feeling about your parents fighting. And from then ever after, every time you eat a carrot you get depressed because the stomach pain caused by the carrot is indistinguishable from the emotional pain you felt during childhood. I think for many people this process envelopes almost every experience they have of illness, and so they just don't realize how bad they feel and how it is affecting them.

If you merely stop eating carrots you will still have this emotional trigger from stomach pain that will incapacitate you to some degree and cause thinking errors.


If you somehow resolve your childhood feelings, you will still get stomach pain from eating carrots.

Incidentally, my parents did fight quite a lot and it overwhelmed me with emotions indeed. :-(

It took me a very long time to resolve these childhood conflicts (which I didn't achieve on my own) and if you have been successful in doing that the psychosomatic symptoms should dissolve sooner or later.

If they don't you'll still have some way to go.

What you are describing is a symptom taking on a life of its own.
The reasons for that could either be extremely traumatic experiences or having delayed the necessary therapy for an irresponsible amount of time.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I wouldn't assume that getting stomach pain from carrots is psychosomatic.

I suppose I should have been clear that in the first case, the stomach pain is caused by stress and in the second case it is caused by being sensitive to carrots. Because the stomach pain is indistinguishable from those crystallized feelings, you feel like you are in an emotional crisis every time you get stomach pain, including stomach pain caused by carrots. Therefore you don't realize you are just sensitive to carrots.

Psychosomatic stomach pain from carrots doesn't really fit here because carrots weren't a part of the original trauma. They are just a trigger for the stomach pain which is emotionally indistinguishable from that trauma.
 

monotonic

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
And I wrote this because I thought it might help Ageeva.

One way to possibly get around this issue of trauma and illness being entangled is to sit with your feelings and try to locate where those feelings are in your body. When I figured this out I was experiencing futile thought patterns and dwelling on past emotional issues. I tried to locate it in my body and realized the only reason I ended up thinking about those things was because I had a headache which I had also had during the original events. I would recognize that stuff was in the past and wasn't relevant but the pain from the headache kept bringing it up in my mind like an intrusive thought that I kept having to put down. Focusing on my body I finally became aware of the headache as separate from the emotional crisis and a surprising shift occurred; I was suddenly able to separate the headache, which was a relevant issue, from the emotional crisis which was long past and irrelevant. The emotional crisis went away and I was able to take care of my body so as not to get headaches. And when I did get headaches after that, it was no longer entangled with those past events.
 

whitecoast

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Awhile back I did some organic acid testing with Genova Diagnostics, and noticed my lactate and pyruvate levels were all in the low range, which is supposed to indicate good thiamine levels. Is it still worth exploring thiamine supplementation to deal with brain health issues? I think my challenges are more microbiome related, based on symptoms.
 
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