Coronavirus Pandemic: Apocalypse Now! Or exaggerated scare story?

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I'm approaching the point where I hope all the O2 starvation renders those idiots somewhat easier to deal with.

I suppose it goes without saying we've all been seeing the new cell-mask-clones operating just about everywhere.

(Pierre) And about what Ark said: that's their life. The face stuck to the screen. It's interesting in conjunction in what we said about how to conduct a healthy life and remove ourselves from STS influences. Imagine the antennas of people doing that and eating crap...

A: We warned strongly about electronic devices years ago!

Q: (Pierre) It has reached epidemic proportions. Most of who we are and what we see and what we think is defined by our receivership capability that is defined basically by protein structures, we are receivers basically. Imagine when you saturate a receiver with destructive radiations from devices? It must be a feast for STS.


Do you wear a mouth mask? 5G follows you by the millimeter 24 hours a day! Where you buy, where you go, who you -flick-, who you meet, how long you have been around etc. etc. etc. Put them in the microwave before use, then the RFID chip is defective.

 
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bjorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
This double standard is going to hunt them and hopefully ruin them completely.

 

Matty F

The Force is Strong With This One
Well our Supreme Leader has graciously lifted the illegal curfew for Melbourne as of tomorrow 5am. And despite all of his promises, unsurprisingly nothing else has really changed. Oh, well the fine has increased from $1,652 to $5k for breaking nonsense convid rules, so that's nice.

On another note, this may sound rather pathetic, but I keep flip-flopping and would be interested in hearing your opinions on what I should do in the following situation....

I have a dental appointment tomorrow. Long time coming. Very sore. It is on the other side of town. More than two hours away on public transport - most definitely beyond the 5km limit which is still enforced.


"Reasons to leave home
During the second step, there are still only four reasons that you can leave home, and you need to stay local (within five kilometres from home):
  1. Shop for food and necessary goods or services
  2. Provide care, for compassionate reasons or to seek medical treatment
  3. Outdoor exercise or recreation
  4. For permitted work or education"
So from what I understand, even for a medical treatment I am not meant to move more than 5km from my home.

I'm going anyway, as I have to. My flip-flopping is in regards to the mask wearing. I actually managed to get a medical exception. And I never wear a mask usually. But! You have all seen how unbelievably fascist our police are, and I am sadly rather nervous about being strangled, beaten up, arrested etc by the cops sometime on this long journey. They will be drawn to me like moths to a flame, and then obviously will henceforth discover I am "out of my zone".

A part of me is stubborn and determined - thinking "screw them! I'm not doing anything wrong!". The other part just wants to get her tooth fixed without any additional fear and anxiety. We have enough of these negative emotions to contend with already without even leaving the "safety" of our homes. If I mask up, then I will more than likely make the journey unscathed. But it just goes against everything I stand for. Argh.

Thoughts?
I think I’d make the journey with as little drama as possible. You need to see the dentist. Maybe just at any opportunity take the mask off or pull it Forward to breath properly. Be completely aware of your surroundings. I know it’s easier said than done when it goes against everything you believe in.
 

transientP

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I second others' opinions here, you need to have your tooth situation taken care of.
Print out the details of your appointment, or have them ready on hand digitally. Wear the mask when recquired and be back home safe to continue to live and love another day.

I really think that being circumspect and patient is the only way to see ourselves through this ordeal with minimum heat taken.
 

Nachtweide

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
1601186785474.png


Just a few weeks ago, despite the fumbling hummanuh-hummanuh protests of those like-minded cretins at CNN, NBC, and the New York Times declaring the numbers at only 17,000, some 1.5 million people took part in boots-in-the-streets marches in Berlin to voice their concern over whether or not they were being told the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about all things COVID. Those MSM mouthpieces also called all those that gathered nothing more than “neo-Nazis” and fringe “conspiracy”-tards. Make no mistake, all of these “conspiracy” people were saying loudly and in the clearest terms imaginable: Stop lying to us. And not just about COVID. About everything. This is the aerial/drone view of the proceedings that is being currently suppressed everywhere – and for good reason – that’s not 17,000 people.

John F. Kennedy: “All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words‚ Ich bin ein Berliner!" (July 8, 1963)

The picture does not show the demonstration in Berlin but the Street Parade 2019 in Zurich/Switzerland
 

Yupo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I think I’d make the journey with as little drama as possible. You need to see the dentist. Maybe just at any opportunity take the mask off or pull it Forward to breath properly. Be completely aware of your surroundings. I know it’s easier said than done when it goes against everything you believe in.
I'd do my very best to blend in with the compliant natives. Also might be good to leave cell phone at home so as not to be location-traced. I'd carry papers to document the medical appointment. I might even ask the provider to email me a note to print out, documenting severity of condition and exceptional need for unusual medical travel.
 

Michael B-C

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
The issue of the number of CEOs who, given the 'call' in the middle of the night by their mate 'Bill' from the yachting club and took the offer and their share options and quietly jumped ship before March 2020, has always interested me both as a systemic system move and as an example of the lead up preparations.

What I didn't think of before was the obvious - that they wouldn't be around to cause trouble when they finally realized that their industry - once untouchable seeming - was not only going to be in the firing line but actually totally expendable and that there were no limits to the take down of previous norms. Hence nothing to lose!

One of those who either didn't get - or maybe heed - the call gives an example of what would have happened if they had all still been in their jobs and facing the ruin that lies ahead - and as a result, backed into a corner, now realizes the need to speak out. In other words nothing to lose!

CityJet boss claims worst of pandemic is over
 

JEEP

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
CityJet boss claims worst of pandemic is over
Yes, noticing that the new tagline is now "casedemic"! As we all know, there's going to be a never-ending escalating discovery of "cases" that have absolutely no dire health consequences whatsoever. Just their desperate ploy to keep their scam fearmongering going so as to enact their ultimate control measures. The cracks are appearing and I expect them to keep growing and spreading.
 

Jones

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
An economist working for the Victorian Treasury, Sanjeev Sabhlok, has quit his job rather than be silenced on speaking out against coronavirus measures.

The basic gist of what he is getting at is that the Victorian government would not look at any other model for dealing with the virus and actively shut down some of those within the ranks trying to speak up about it even if alternative models protected the economy and therefore more lives.

Why I quit rather than be silenced: Vic Treasury insider

A former Victorian Treasury economist explains how he quit to keep speaking out against policy blunders.

Last week I quit my job as an economist in the Victorian Department of Finance and Treasury so that I would be free to speak out against the state’s management of the COVID-19 infection.

I had made a number of criticisms of the state government on social media. The head of human relations at Treasury asked me to remove them. I considered deleting the few direct criticisms, but they wanted all indirect criticism removed too. I resigned on the same day, the only honourable course for a free citizen of Australia. I never dreamed I would see some of the tactics being used to defend the state’s health.

The pandemic policies being pursued in Australia – particularly in Victoria – are the most heavy-handed possible, a sledgehammer to kill a swarm of flies. These policies are having hugely adverse economic, social and health effects, with the poorer sections of the community that don’t have the ability to work from home suffering the most.

Australia is signalling to the world that it is closed for business and doesn’t care for human freedoms. This will dampen business investment but also impact future skilled migration, the education industry and tourism.

The whole thing hinges on the scare created by politicians and health professionals. For instance, Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton claims this is the “greatest public health challenge since the Spanish flu”.

But this is no Spanish flu – we can verify that easily.

The Spanish flu killed at least 50 million people worldwide in 1918 when the global population was 1.8 billion. Proportionately, to be as lethal as Spanish flu, a virus would have to kill at least 210 million people today. Instead, only around 0.9 million have died so far (compare this also with the 60 million who ordinarily die each year).

What about a second wave? There has never been a second wave hundreds of times bigger than the first. We can be reasonably certain that while this virus may create further ripples, its ultimate magnitude will end up in the range of the 1957 Asian flu.

The need for good policy process does not disappear just because we face a public health crisis.
But even if the pandemic had been as big as the Spanish flu, lockdowns could never have been justified. There are strong scientific arguments against lockdowns too.

So what should the government have done? The data were clear from February itself that the elderly are many times more vulnerable to a serious outcome than the young. It was necessary, therefore, to work out a targeted age-based strategy and start aggressively protecting and isolating the elderly, even as the rest of the population was advised on relevant precautions. But that wasn’t done.

The need for good policy process does not disappear just because we face a public health crisis. In fact, it gets even more urgent.

The Victorian Guide to Regulation notes that “It is not possible for governments to provide a completely ‘risk free’ society, or to prevent every possible event that might cause harm”. Further: “The direct and indirect costs imposed by regulatory approaches may not be … immediately obvious. Risk regulation that is poorly targeted or costly will divert resources from other priorities.”

Governments back in February needed to commission a cost-benefit analysis of alternative policy options that took into account different scenarios (such as with and without a vaccine). Thereafter, the best option had to be picked given the uncertainty, but consistent also with the need to intrude minimally into human freedoms. This cost-benefit analysis and policies needed then to be updated as new information emerged (such as the fact that epidemiological models have badly exaggerated the risk).

Governments should have also realised at the outset that they are hostage to chronic groupthink and actively sought alternative advice. I attempted repeatedly to raise my voice within my public sector role, but my attempts were rebuffed. The bureaucracy has clamped down on frank and fearless, impartial advice, in a misplaced determination to support whatever the government decides, (instead of performing its taxpayer-funded duty of providing forthright analysis of alternatives).

While there is scientific argument against lockdowns, there are divergent views on matters such as the effectiveness of masks. I am a mask fanatic but there was never any reason to mandate these debatable requirements. Voluntary, performance-based rules would allow the private sector to innovate, leaving people with the power of agency, to determine their own fate – thereby minimising economic harm, and harm to mental health and general well-being.

Here's an interview with him.

19:29

In his latest fb post he's basically pointing out that current measures are still operating in excess of the Pandemic plan of the Victorian Health Department!

Could I request FB friends and visitors to this page to read this 10 March 2020 Victorian plan and identify anything that is problematic.

I find this to be risk-based and proportionate, very well considered.

Instead, Victoria implemented measures that do not find any mention in this plan:

- 5 km imprisonment
- 23 hour imprisonment
- solitary confinement of thousands of people
- mandatory mask in open air where virus is known not to transmit
- empty ICUs that operate well below capacity
- waiting for a vaccine.

Can people please check that I'm making the correct deductions.

 
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