Do some French people see what's going on? Yellow Vest Protests

Ursus Minor

Jedi Master
EoTech holographic laser sight (deployed by French Riot Police)

This is an excerpt from the article We're living in "The Groundhog Show" by Chris Martenson


The French feel under attack by a system that cares more for assuring that the wealthy get wealthier than it does for its own people.
To (literally) add injury to insult, thousands of demonstrators have been grievously wounded by militarized French police -- who are using far-too-excessive force when controlling the crowds:



That device atop the firearm is an EoTech holographic laser sight. It places a bright red dot on the point of impact. While it provides no magnification, it does allow both eyes to be open as it’s being used and, most importantly, relieves the operator of having to use precise sight alignment as the projected red dot magically moves with the operators head to always show the true point of impact. The rifled barrel simply means these devices are quite accurate.


I just wanted to dispel any notion that it’s somehow accidental that so many people are being shot in the face/eyes during the protests. The police are intentionally selected protestors as targets, individually, and then shooting to wound, intentionally.
The people of France are taking notice of this. Both that the police are purposely inflicting life-altering injuries and that their President (Macron) implicitly and explicitly endorses these tactics and expresses zero concern for those injured. After several months of protests, he’s not yet visited a single injured person in the hospital or put any limits on the police's suppressive tactics.
Authorities fear losing control of the narrative. If they do, there's nothing separating them from suffering the consequences of their disastrous and self-serving decisions. [...]
 

Gandalf

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by the way, my husband doesn't encounter this, and for me, I got this message only on his channel, all others youtube video work fine, I guess I'm somewhat spotted !)
No problem for me too.
 

Windmill knight

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A short RT interview in French with gilet jaune leader Eric Drouet (the one they had put in jail for a day for marching without a permit). I like this guy! But of course you'll not see this kind of stuff outside RT or alternative media:


I've been looking for some update from Vicent Lapierre or his team, but I can't find anything so far.

However, I did find this interesting video, shot in Toulouse, in which a policeman was not happy with an order from his superior and head-butted him!

 

Adaryn

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Update from Vincent Lapierre:

Hello everyone, this is Vincent. I've been released following 24h spent in custody. The reason for it: possession of a small tear gas canister. Of course, this measure is disproportionate and unfair, given that I'm regularly assaulted by individuals who are never bothered by the police (all the complaints I've filed against them have been dropped), but I'm not afraid. Le Média pour Tous will live.
My report on Acte XV, which is very interesting (I managed to talk to the antifas), will soon be released.
Thank you all for your support, which is very important for us facing the PTB.
Kind Regards,
Vincent
PS : I'll report soon on the issue of police custody in France... which in itself is a whole issue.
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
In a newly-released book “The People and the President” authors Cyril Graziani and Cécile Amar look into the ongoing Yellow Vest rallies, which have been raging across France since mid-November.

Mon Feb 25, 2019 - New Book on Yellow Vests Claims Macron Sorry for 'Humiliating' French People

Farsnews
New Book on Yellow Vests Claims Macron Sorry for 'Humiliating' French People


The authors cited French President Emmanuel Macron as labelling the unrest a “gigantic collective failure” that he said he shares responsibility for and pledged to fix before his presidential term ends, RIA Novosti reported.

“It is a gigantic collective failure for which I share responsibility. But I have three years to change that. Lots of people were ashamed of their life, of not being able to make ends meet despite their best efforts. We’re the ones who should be ashamed,” he noted.

Macron confesses in the book that he underestimated the power of the Yellow Vest movement, which started out as a protest against a hike in fuel taxes but quickly morphed into an anti-government revolt.

The reason for his miscalculation is that the rallies were initially “smaller than those against the reform of [national rail operator] SNCF” before Christmas, which he managed to stop.

“Where I was wrong once president, people didn’t take it as conversation between equals. They said: ‘He’s the president’. It was perceived as a form of humiliation. It is my fault”, the book cited Macron as saying.

In early December, Macron arrived in the town of Le Puy-en-Velay, where Yellow Vests briefly set fire to the local state prefect’s offices, and in light of the events was quickly escorted off the site by his security.

“They may shoot me dead with a bullet one day but never by any other means,” the French president was reportedly unfazed and said.

Macron also accused the media of treating the Yellow Vests as “equally representative and perhaps more sincere than a mayor or a unionist”, adding that “I’ve done my mea culpa but journalists should do theirs”.

The French president also pointed out that he is alone in the face of demonstrations.

“I’m fighting for you. Who has supported me in the Yellow Vest crisis? Nobody. The French people chose me, not the Republic of parties. I owe them everything. If I fail, I will have failed for them and with them. Never against them,” he stated.

The authors further quoted Macron as suggesting he could have quelled the unrest that triggered violent weekly protests throughout France if he had personally met demonstrators that occupied Gaillon roundabout in Normandy days after it erupted.

“It was necessary at that moment. He had to go and meet them on the ground; that he took as step in their direction”, French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner was cited as saying.

The meeting was scheduled but Macron eventually refused to go, reasoning that it was for the government and other officials to act as mediators.

The wave of Yellow Vests protests, which have been marked by violent clashes with police, kicked off in mid-November over the increase in fuel taxes.

Even though the government decided to abandon the planned hike, the protests didn’t stop and evolved in a broader movement against the Elysee’s policies, with many demanding that Macron resign.

In order to end the demonstrations, Macron has urged the French people to take part in a three-month national debate that will concentrate on such topics as taxes, public spending, and environmental reforms.
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I wonder how the authors managed to obtain these' wonderful' thoughts and musings of Macron.
Macron probably keeps "an Inspirational Diary" where he enters daily quotes for prosperity? The cover of the Diary, "How Great -Are Thou" in gold lettering? I'm sure, he loves sharing "his brilliant mind"?

France's 'yellow vests' march largely without violence as tensions ease
A protester wearing a yellow vest waves a French flag as he stands on the Champs Elysees near the Arc de Triomphe during a demonstration by the "yellow vests" movement in Paris, France, March 2, 2019. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
Turnout for a 16th round of "yellow vest" protests in France on Saturday was below last week's levels and marches were largely peaceful, in a relief for President Emmanuel Macron who has struggled to find a response to the movement.

Protesters marched largely peacefully on Saturday from the Arc de Triomphe to Place Denfert-Rochereau on the residential left bank, though water cannon were briefly used to douse protesters on the Champs Elysees boulevard.

Tear gas and water cannon were also used in Bordeaux, and in Toulouse, where some protesters marched behind a “cacatov party” banner - a play on Molotov cocktail firebombs - encouraging people to throw “poo-bombs” at police.

There were no reports of anyone being hit by a “catatov”, but the threat of excrement projectiles was of concern to reporters covering the marches in Toulouse and Paris.

Large parts of central Paris were in lockdown as thousands of police cordoned off key areas around the presidential palace and government buildings.

French tax on internet giants could yield 500 million euros per year: Le Maire
FILE PHOTO - The Google name is displayed outside the company's office in London, Britain November 1, 2018.  REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo
A three percent tax on the French revenue of large internet companies could yield 500 million euros (568.5 million pounds) per year, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said on Sunday.

Le Maire told Le Parisien newspaper the tax is aimed at companies with worldwide digital revenue of at least 750 million and French revenue of more than 25 million euros.

He said the tax would target some 30 companies, mostly American, but also Chinese, German, Spanish and British, as well as one French firm and several firms with French origins that have been bought by foreign companies.

The paper listed Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple (the four so-called “GAFA” companies) but also Uber, Airbnb, Booking and French online advertising specialist Criteo as targets.

He added it is also a matter of fiscal justice, as the digital giants pay some 14 percentage points less tax than European small-and-medium sized companies.

Fairer taxes are a key demand of the “yellow vest” protests seen across France in the past three months.
 

Aeneas

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
He added it is also a matter of fiscal justice, as the digital giants pay some 14 percentage points less tax than European small-and-medium sized companies.
One could ask why a tax of 14% is not considered but only 3%. In that way the playing field is leveled a little bit more. I also wonder why a tax on McDonald, Starbucks, Burgerking etc is not considered as from what I understand they don't pay taxes in Europe as they are not incorporated in Europe.
 

Pierre

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One could ask why a tax of 14% is not considered but only 3%
Exactly. It is in line without the 8% marginal taxation rate of the 40 largest French companies listed in the stock exchange. Meanwhile, our small publishing company, like other SMEs in France, is taxed at 30%.

Actually, the real taxation rate of multinational companies is even lower because most of them locate their cost centers in countries with 'normal' taxation and concentrate their profits (profit centers) in tax heavens.
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
French President Emmanuel Macron has made an impassioned defense of a new Europe in a newspaper column published in each of the 28 member states in which he laid out his ideas for a "European renaissance" ahead of EU elections in May.

Ahead of EU elections, Macron unveils plan for 'European renaissance'
FILE PHOTO: French President Emmanuel Macron watches as German Chancellor Angela Merkel departs after a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, February 27, 2019.   REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes/File Photo

FILE PHOTO: French President Emmanuel Macron watches as German Chancellor Angela Merkel departs after a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, February 27, 2019. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes/File Photo

Calling the vote decisive and warning of a Europe in danger, his words are intended as a wake-up call for the bloc as he seeks to push fundamental reform of the European Union.

Macron’s column coincides with rising tensions in the West, shaken by U.S. President Donald Trump’s “America First” policies and Britain’s departure from the EU. A more assertive China and Russia also pose major challenges.

A number of proposals made in the column to appear on Tuesday in newspapers ranging from The Guardian in Britain to Die Welt in Germany and El Pais in Spain aim at protecting and defending Europe’s citizens while giving the bloc new impetus in the face of global competition.

“In a few weeks, the European elections will be decisive for the future of our continent. Europe has never been as necessary since World War Two as it is now and yet never has Europe been in such danger,” Macron wrote. “Nationalism offers nothing. It is a project of rejection.”


Proposals include creating a European agency to protect democracies which would provide experts to safeguard elections from manipulation and a ban on financing by foreign powers of European political parties.

Macron also suggested reviewing the Schengen system and creating a common border police and European asylum office.

The French leader is focused on championing a “Europe that protects” for the May 26 European election as he seeks to convince voters with plans aimed at reforming Europe’s trade, competition, digital and climate policies, including creating a European climate bank to finance the ecological transition.

He also urged a ban on companies that threaten European strategic interests and called for a type of Europe first policy as America and China have done.

As part of efforts to convince European citizens not to back nationalists, Macon also urged for European institutions and states to take part in a “Conference for Europe” by year-end. Its objective would be to propose changes to the bloc’s political project without taboos, including reviewing existing treaties.

“In this Europe, the people will have truly taken back control of their destiny; in this Europe, Britain, I am sure, will find its place,” Macron wrote.

Speaking of the European Union ...

Slowing time? EU wants to delay clock change move to 2021
FILE PHOTO: The clock faces on the Pembroke Clock Tower are seen in Pembroke, Malta, January 25, 2018.  REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi/File Photo
A committee at the European Parliament on Monday gave the thumbs up to scrapping the twice-yearly clock change in the European Union but with a two-year delay to 2021.

Last year, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker kicked off the debate with his proposal to halt the decades-old practice of daylight savings time in 2019, garnering support from about 3.8 million Europeans.

About 4.6 million EU citizens - out of 510 million - took part in the Commission’s online survey. Of those, 84 percent were against putting clocks forward in spring and back in autumn every year.

A majority of lawmakers on the European Parliament’s transport and tourism committee backed the Commission’s proposal.

The plenary will now have to approve the proposal after which lawmakers will have to thrash out a common position with EU countries.

Currently, EU countries switch to summer time on the last Sunday of March and back to standard time on the last Sunday of October.
 

mabar

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
People are so jumpy nowadays, the atmosphere of the authorities vs the yellow vests protests nor does it contribute much It turned out to be a flase alarm, there was a problem with an elevator that caused a very loud noise and so...

Panic and evacuation at Disneyland Park in Paris (videos)
Witnesses have reported panic during store and restaurant evacuations. Some internet users reported on social networks about a strong blow or an explosion. Several buildings have been evacuated, while others are closed.

According to later reports, it was a problem with an elevator that frightened crowds and for the moment there is no danger.
--using deeple.com
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
To close his tour of the one man show "le Grand Blabla", Manu Macron chose Corsica. And he didn't land alone on the beauty island.

In Corsica, the security deployed for Emmanuel Macron's visit does not go unnoticed.
PRESIDENTIAL VISIT The presence, numerous, of the police forces is noticed on the island. But the communication around the device is locked.
Norias from CRS vans. The security around Emmanuel Macron's visit to Corsica on Thursday did not go unnoticed. Images filmed by France 3 Corse ( France 3 Corse) show the arrival of CRS at the port of Ajaccio. According to the local media, the prefecture and the airport, where the president arrived this Thursday morning, are also under close surveillance. The village of Cozzano, where Emmanuel Macron is participating in a debate with mayors, is also closed. The journalists' equipment was checked by a police dog, according to our colleagues from Corsica Matin.


In this context, a photo showing dozens of CRS vans on the lower deck of a ferry turned viral this Thursday on Facebook. It has been shared 15,000 times in less than 24 hours.
[to see the picture and the french link HERE.]
Corsica Ferries confirms at 20 Minutes that the picture was taken on one of its ships. "Law enforcement and rescue services regularly travel on ferries, regardless of the company making the crossing. Police officers and their vehicles are passengers like any other in terms of marine security or ticket purchases," the company adds.

The photo, however, is not dated. Contacted by 20 Minutes, the user who posted the picture says he found the image on Facebook, but can't give more details. A reverse image search on Tineye or the various search engines does not give details on the age of the photo.
The Elysée "never communicates on the security system" around the president

How many police and gendarmes were deployed on the island on Thursday? Requested by 20 Minutes, neither the Elysée, nor the communication service of the national police, nor the prefecture of South Corsica want to specify it. "We never communicate about the security measures surrounding the President of the Republic," explains the Elysée. This is important information for those who want to undermine its integrity. »

Corse Matin estimates that about a thousand police forces were mobilised for this visit. On Monday, two explosive charges were found outside tax offices in Bastia and Ville-di-Pietrabugno, near Bastia.
the ajaccians probably did not expect this kind of tourism, even if they are used to traffic jams, not to mention the traffic as soon as there is a ferry disembarking or embarking for the continent.
 

angelburst29

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said that after three months of public debate it was that clear tax cuts must be speeded up to quell the widespread anger over high living costs that has fueled anti-government protests.

April 8, 2019 - Macron's Great Debate shows need to cut taxes faster, says French PM
French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe leaves after his speech during the presentation of the Great National Debate findings, called to quell the anger of French yellow vests movement, at the Grand Palais in Paris, France, April 8, 2019.  REUTERS/Charles Platiau

French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe leaves after his speech during the presentation of the "Great National Debate" findings, called to quell the anger of French "yellow vests" movement, at the Grand Palais in Paris, France, April 8, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

In an act of political theater on Monday, Philippe was presenting the findings from two million online contributions and 10,000 hours of town hall debates that President Emmanuel Macron must now digest and respond to with policy moves.

Four broad needs emerged, the prime minister said: renewing ties between Paris and the regions, making the political process more relevant for citizens, responding better to climate change, and easing the tax burden.

“The debate clearly shows us in which direction we need to go: we need to lower taxes and lower them faster,” Philippe said in a speech in the Grand Palace in Paris.

Planned increases to a fuel tax prompted five months of “yellow vest” protests nationwide and the worst rioting Paris has witnessed since the 1968 student uprising, though the discontent swiftly turned into a broader backlash against inequality and an aloof political elite.

More violence in mid-March reminded Macron that putting his reform agenda back on track would not be easy and the unrest could damage his party’s European election campaign.

The “yellow vests” remain an amorphous group with varied demands, including higher salaries, better public services, and more power for voters on policy decisions. Tight public finances mean Macron has limited wriggle room.

“The French have understood ... that we cannot lower taxes if we don’t lower public spending,” Philippe said.

The debates reinvigorated Macron, who rolled up his sleeves and held forth for up to seven hours at a time with high-school students, mayors and working mothers, as well as intellectuals and philosophers.

Polls showed only a tentative recovery in Macron’s weak popularity, so the stakes are high for him and his prime minister.

New policy measures are yet to be decided and could be put to a plebiscite. The option of a referendum - which has the advantage of responding to the yellow vests’ demand for more people’s votes - remains on the table.

Nonetheless, Ingrid Levavasseur, who pulled out of leading a “yellow vest” list for the European elections because of internal divisions within the movement, doubted the debates would produce meaningful reform. “I count myself among the skeptics,” she stated.

The Paris prosecutor has opened a preliminary investigation into alleged perjury related to the so-called "Benalla scandal" involving former and current officials from President Emmanuel Macron's administration.
April 8, 2019 - French prosecutor opens preliminary investigations over Benalla affair
Alexandre Benalla, French President Emmanuel Macron's former senior security officer, leaves after a hearing by senators from France's upper house at the Senate in Paris, France, January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

Alexandre Benalla, French President Emmanuel Macron's former senior security officer, leaves after a hearing by senators from France's upper house at the Senate in Paris, France, January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

The Paris prosecutor has opened a preliminary investigation into alleged perjury related to the so-called "Benalla scandal" involving former and current officials from President Emmanuel Macron's administration.

The prosecutor did not make clear in its statement who was targeted by the investigation.

However, it said it had opened the probe at the request of the Senate, where lawmakers had suspicions about statements made under oath there by Alexandre Benalla, Macron’s ex-security aide, Vincent Crase, a former staffer Macron’s party, Patrick Strzoda, Macron’s chief of staff.

The Senate had also flagged Alexis Kohler, the presidency’s top official, as well as Lionel Lavergne, the head of his security staff, to the prosecutor’s office for having “withheld information” from a parliamentary investigation.

French anti-meat activists jailed for vandalizing butchers April 4, 2019
French anti-meat activists who vandalized butchers shops and restaurants serving meat have been jailed by a court in Lille, northern France.

April 8, 2019 - Israel jails Frenchman for seven years for smuggling Palestinian guns
FILE PHOTO -  Romain Franck, an employee of the French consulate-general in Jerusalem, appears with co-defendants in the district court in Beersheba, Israel, March 19, 2018. REUTERS/Amir Cohen

FILE PHOTO - Romain Franck, an employee of the French consulate-general in Jerusalem, appears with co-defendants in the district court in Beersheba, Israel, March 19, 2018. REUTERS/Amir Cohen

Romain Franck, a former employee of the French consulate in Jerusalem, was arrested last year and accused by Israeli prosecutors of receiving $7,600 for transporting the contraband between the Islamist-ruled Gaza Strip and occupied West Bank.

He was not charged with complicity in terrorism, sparing him a potentially harsher sentence. Also arrested in the case was Palestinian from East Jerusalem.

Beesheba District Court said that Franck, who was 23 when indicted, would spend seven years in jail, including time already served. He also received an 18-month suspended sentence and ordered to pay a 30,000 shekel (7,420 euro) fine.

A French embassy spokesman declined comment on the sentencing.

Macron to host UK's May in Paris on Tuesday for Brexit talks: Elysee
French President Emmanuel Macron will host British Prime Minister Theresa May for Brexit talks at the Elysee palace in Paris on Tuesday evening, a presidency official said on Monday.

April 6, 2019 - France says G7 mostly agreed except on Iran, Israeli-Palestinian issue
French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian attends a working session during the Foreign ministers of G7 nations meeting in Dinard, France, April 6, 2019. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe/Pool

Foreign ministers of the Group of Seven nations broadly agreed on issues during a two-day meeting, but were unable to bridge differences on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and how to deal with Iran, France's top diplomat said on Saturday.

April 6, 2019 - Smileys and selfies: Europe's far-right tries to end divisions
FILE PHOTO: Italian far-right leader Matteo Salvini (R), French far-right leader Marine Le Pen (C) and Austrian far-right leader Heinz-Christian Strache give a thumbs up at the end of the Europe of Nations and Freedom meeting in Milan, January 28, 2016. REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo/File Photo

Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini sends texts with smileys to French far-right leader Marine Le Pen and posts selfies with Austrian far-right politician Heinz-Christian Strache.
 
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