Iodine and Potassium Iodide

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Gaby said:
Keyhole said:
Gaby said:
Got my lab results and my TSH is down to 4.7. It used to be over 10 a year or so ago. I started taking a bovine thyroid glandular supplement too, but it was just a few doses before the lab test. I continue to take a drop of iodine any now and then. It really gives more energy and mental clarity when I do.
That TSH is still pretty high Gaby. Is it NDT? And if it is, which brand and what dose?
It is without prescription, usually taken as a step before or instead of porcine dissecated extracts. I'll post some articles later. The one I use is from Allergy Research Group, Bovine Thyroid Tissue.
Ok. Have you got any data on what your vitamin A levels are?

Might be a good idea to consider vitamin A in conjunction with the thyroid. Speaking from experience, the past 3 months of taking NDT 1-2 grains per day + vitamin A has COMPLETELY eliminated my dandruff and dry skin.

Test axillary temp first thing upon waking up preferably with mercury thermometer. Dr Broda Barnes said anything less than 36.5 is almost always hypothyroid.

If TSH stays high in a couple of weeks or so and your internal temps have not risen, Dr Ray peat advises that it is likely a Nitric Oxide issue. When NO is bound to cyt c oxidase, metabolism is unable to increase. So if you conclude that the problem with metabolism is NO, you could try two things : Near IR light via lightbulbs/ sunlight + 1-2mg Methylene Blue to displace the NO and detoxify it.

Persej said:
Gaby said:
Got my lab results and my TSH is down to 4.7. It used to be over 10 a year or so ago.
That is very close to my 4.5. Like I said, I wonder if that is the true normal level of TSH in people who have sufficient amounts of iodine in their diets? When I had 6, with two drops, I could feel a little warmth in my thyroid, like I'm overloading a bit, but since I dropped to one drop and my new level is 4.5 I don't feel anything.
Hmm, again Broda Barnes and many physicians who were pioneers in thyroid health assumed the opposite to be true... Ray Peat has said that in his experience, that anything above 0.6-0.8 is basically hypo and the person is sick. The only healthy people he has seen have TSH far below even normal reference ranges. So, at 4.5 TSH, it may be worth trying out the internal body temperature measurement to try to gain an accurate perspective on how fast your metabolism is systemically.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I'm experimenting with these protocols, though the main problem in my case seems to be mercury toxicity. A kinesiologist read that it was mainly concentrated in my thyroid and I suspected as much after some of the research quoted earlier in this thread. I've doing a gentle detox for some time, though I might do something more after the summer.

For now I'm feeling okay, and TSH down over 5 points is a good sign.
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Keyhole said:
Hmm, again Broda Barnes and many physicians who were pioneers in thyroid health assumed the opposite to be true... Ray Peat has said that in his experience, that anything above 0.6-0.8 is basically hypo and the person is sick. The only healthy people he has seen have TSH far below even normal reference ranges. So, at 4.5 TSH, it may be worth trying out the internal body temperature measurement to try to gain an accurate perspective on how fast your metabolism is systemically.
Ok. I don't have a thermometer where I am right now, but I will test my morning body temp as soon as I can find mercury thermometer. I am skinny person but that doesn't correspond with hypothyroidism.
 

Keyhole

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Persej said:
Keyhole said:
Hmm, again Broda Barnes and many physicians who were pioneers in thyroid health assumed the opposite to be true... Ray Peat has said that in his experience, that anything above 0.6-0.8 is basically hypo and the person is sick. The only healthy people he has seen have TSH far below even normal reference ranges. So, at 4.5 TSH, it may be worth trying out the internal body temperature measurement to try to gain an accurate perspective on how fast your metabolism is systemically.
Ok. I don't have a thermometer where I am right now, but I will test my morning body temp as soon as I can find mercury thermometer. I am skinny person but that doesn't correspond with hypothyroidism.
By modern standards yes, skinny doesn't correspond with hypothyroidism. But mainstream medicine fails to acknowledge the role of cortisol and other stress hormones in a hypothyroid state. Subclinical hypothyroidism/ sluggish thyroid function can manifest in all manner of ways, and may not even relate to weight management. But from what I understand, for a skinny individual it generally features chronic excesses of stress hormones which catabolize fat and muscle tissue. The stress response is initiated in response to low metabolic rate (less oxidative phosphorylation), which provides energy via muscle/sugar to the cell to upregulate glycolysis. Similar to most diseases, we see an upregulation of glycolysis, and a downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation.

Hypothyroidism is diagnosed at the pituitary/thyroid gland level. So there may be nothing wrong with the two glands, but it may be transportation issues or cellular utilisation - which is ultimately has the same consequences... inefficient utilisation of thyroid hormone. So apologies, because when I say "hypothyroidism", it doesn't necessarily refer to thyroid inadequecy (although it can do).

So there are several factors which can lead to this kind of scenario I think. A couple (apparently the most common) are: excess nitric oxide, excess estrogen, CoQ10 deficiency, B deficiencies (especially B1 because it is needed for pyruvate dehydrogenase complex), glycolysis upregulation ----> excess lactic acid, stress, etc etc.

For a lot of people, they start taking thyroid hormone and get great results, which suggests that it was related to thyroid insufficiency. When you consider that Barnes' and colleagues showed that 40% of patients were hypothyroid back in the 1950's, compared to the onslaught we face today.... it would not be surprising if most people had poor thyroid function to some degree.

For some context and fascinating information check out this thread started a couple of days ago:
Thyroid Hormones: A possible solution to cardiovascular disease (& many others)
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I mentioned before on the forum the role of thiocyanate in killing the bacteria, but I couldn't find the practical combination with iodine. Well, it seems that I managed to find something interesting:

A novel antibiotic treatment inspired by our immune system

Researchers from the National University of Ireland Galway have developed a new antibacterial treatment, effective against drug-resistant bacteria, which takes inspiration from the human immune system.

This treatment, called the ‘iodo-thiocyanate complex’, or ITC for short, also showed a low propensity to lead to the development of resistant bacterial strains.

The paper was published on May 2 in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology.

Work on the treatment began in response to the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. As more and more bacteria become immune to antibiotics, and the number of drugs we can rely on dwindle away, our ability to fight back against life-threatening infections is diminishing significantly – meaning it’s more important than ever to find new ways to deal with these organisms.

The complex is a combination of three ingredients – iodide, thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide. Which react together to generate oxidised molecules with antimicrobial properties. These molecules can kill bacteria by damaging important cellular structures and components, leading to cell death.

Our immune system features a similar mechanism, which works through peroxidase enzymes. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, these enzymes allow the production of oxidised molecules and can be found in a number of bodily secretions, such as milk, tears and gastrointestinal fluid.

So why haven’t peroxidase enzymes been incorporated into an antimicrobial treatment? The problem is that purifying the enzymes can be extremely expensive, and actually producing enough to be used as an antimicrobial wouldn’t be feasible.

However, while ITC works under the same principal, it doesn’t need peroxidase enzymes to work, meaning a similar effect could generated with much less cost.

The researchers tested the antibiotic effects of ITC on a range of bacterial strains, both planktonic (in free-floating cell suspensions) and in biofilms. These biofilms, a layer of bacteria which can coat a wide variety of surfaces, are particularly dangerous as they’re capable of contaminating medical equipment, such as catheters, or infecting wounds – which can lead to life threatening infections. What’s more, bacteria in a biofilm formation have been associated with a greater tendency to develop antibiotic resistance.

It was found that ITC could kill all bacteria tested against, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), both when the bacteria were planktonic and in biofilms. In some cases, the complex was able to kill the bacteria within 30 seconds.

They also discovered that the effectiveness of ITC to kill the bacteria didn’t diminish after repeated applications, suggesting that the complex doesn’t lead to the emergence of resistant bacteria. This is probably because of the fact that the complex contains two substrates (iodide and thiocyanate) which, when oxidised, produce a ‘cocktail’ of different antimicrobial molecules with different targets. A multitude of targets means that it’s much less likely that resistant bacterial strains will emerge.

The research team hope that the treatment could be used to disinfect surfaces and help treat infected wounds. However, the next step would be to make sure that the complex is safe to use in people.

“We will need to assess the safety and suitability of the complexes for use in, or on, humans,” said Professor Vincent O’Flaherty, one of the study’s authors. “We will also need to develop delivery systems to deploy the treatment in a variety of settings that are currently affected by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.”

https://lucbourne.scienceblog.com/145/a-novel-antibiotic-treatment-inspired-by-our-immune-system/
The research article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5412088/

The patent article: https://www.google.com/patents/EP2987408A1?cl=en

The use of PVP-I has overcome some of the disadvantages of tinctures of iodine and Lugol's solution (a solution of iodine with iodide ions) as regards long term storage, free vs total iodine and toxicity issues etc. However, the commonly used iodophors such as PVP-I are very unstable in the presence of organic material. On dissolving PVP-I in water, the compound exerts significant antimicrobial activity, but minimal antimicrobial activity in the presence of organic matter. For example, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of PVP-I in water for E. coli ATCC 25922 is <1 mg L-1. On repetition of the test in an organic rich growth medium (such as lysogeny broth), the MBC value is recorded at >500 mg L-1. This discrepancy in MBC values indicates the limitations of traditional iodophors. Use of such a concentration in many environments would be practically difficult, prohibitively expensive and potentially toxic.

In the dairy industry, PVP-I is regularly used to clean teats of cows before and after milking to kill bacteria present. However, if the PVP-I comes into contact with milk, activity is quickly diminished. The same pattern occurs in other industries, such as baking etc, as food residue left on machinery can interact with the PVP-I and halt its antimicrobial effect.

[...]

As is clear from Table 1, the iodophor (1%, 1:1) is effective at inhibiting each of the organisms (including antibiotic-resistant organisms) at concentrations of less than 30 mg L-1. This level of activity is approaching antibiotic levels of activity at low concentrations. As a comparison, PVP-I and Lugol's iodine were unsuccessful at eliminating the same bacterial strains below concentrations of 500-1,000 mg L-1. This is due to the deleterious inactiviation of the PVP-I or Lugol's-derived iodine by organic material present in the growth medium. Such differences in MICs were noted in various growth media and a milk environment (MIC of <30 mg L-1 for the iodo-thiocyanate iodophor and >500-1000 L-1 PVP-I/Lugol's).

[...]

The described compositions have been shown to be bacteriocidal and not bacteriostatic. If an antimicrobial compound is removed from the environment and the bacteria/virus/fungi/yeast once again begin to proliferate, the compound would be described as bacteriostatic (i.e. stopping the cells from growing). If they didn't recover the compound would be classed as bacteriocidal (i.e. killing of cells). In tests with the novel iodophor, viable bacterial cells were not recoverable using 20 mg L-1 in saline for 1 hour, even with the addition of sodium pyruvate to the saline to help bacterial recovery. Using an equivalent concentration (and a further concentration 10 times greater) of hydrogen peroxide alone resulted in the recovery of viable cells, demonstrating that the killing was not peroxide mediated.
So this thing is more powerful than Lugol's and povidone iodine.
 

cope

Jedi
About the panacea effects of iodyne on the health and wellness show with lynne farrow, it was said: "his mother-in-law was taking iodine and something fell out of her ears, like little bones he said, and that she started hearing again." Could this have been "surfers ear", a narrowing calcification of the channel, caused by years of cold ears?
Standard treatment is mechanical an too gross to consider..
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Merci Persej pour ces articles très intéressants...
Ma tension est à 15 et mon médecin me dit que c'est trop...
J'ai déjà arrêter le sel Celtic...
Qu'en pensez vous ?...

Thanks Persej for these very interesting articles ...
My blood pressure is 15 and my doctor tells me it's too much ...
I already stop Celtic salt ...
What do you think ?...
 

griffin

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
PERLOU said:
[...]
My blood pressure is 15 and my doctor tells me it's too much ...
I already stop Celtic salt ...
What do you think ?...
Well, since no one else has responded to you yet, and although I'm an american and not a doctor... I think your doctor might be a little over-concerned to frown at a systolic blood pressure reading of 15 kPa. If I were you, I would continue taking a moderate amount of Celtic salt daily. You might consider taking a little less salt if your systolic blood pressure reading rises above 15 kPa, but not at this time.

Here's a link to a blood pressure conversion tool online:
http://www.etoolsage.com/Converter/Blood_Pressure_Conversion.asp

Using the handy chart at the bottom of that page, you can put the normal blood pressure values into the US (mm Hg) conversion fields on the left side and read the Europe (kPa) equivalents on the right side. You will see that US 120/80 equates to Europe 15.99/10.66. So your reading of 15 is still within the normal range.

I won't conjecture about why your doctor would falsely characterize your reading of 15 as 'high', and of course Gaby might disagree with me or have additional comments.
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Merci Griffin pour votre réponse et votre lien...
D'après ce lien, 15 de tension en France est de 112.50 aux Etats Unis ce qui semble est tout à fait normal...
J'aurai 62 ans bientôt...

Thank you Griffon for your answer and your link ...
According to this link, 15 tension in France is 112.50 in the United States which seems quite normal ...
I will be 62 soon ...
 

Ant22

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
PERLOU said:
Merci Griffin pour votre réponse et votre lien...
D'après ce lien, 15 de tension en France est de 112.50 aux Etats Unis ce qui semble est tout à fait normal...
J'aurai 62 ans bientôt...

Thank you Griffon for your answer and your link ...
According to this link, 15 tension in France is 112.50 in the United States which seems quite normal ...
I will be 62 soon ...
Hi PERLOU, I'm not a doctor either but I agree with griffin, I also wouldn't stop taking Celtic salt completely.

It is a very popular view that salt is bad for our health. But as we know, this is not the case with Celtic salt. In this thread it is recommended to take Celtic salt to minimise the detox effects of iodine. Since you posted this in the Iodine thread, I'm guessing you still take iodine? If you are, I think it would be a good idea to continue to take the salt.

A good question to answer would be: what other dietary or lifestyle factors could be causing your elevated blood pressure? If it is in fact elevated. According to the link griffin provided it is not as bad as you thought.





Translation by Go0gle / Traduction par Go0gle:

Bonjour PERLOU, je ne suis pas médecin non plus, mais je suis d'accord avec le griffon, je n'arrêterais pas de prendre complètement le sel celtique.

C'est une opinion très populaire selon laquelle le sel est mauvais pour notre santé. Mais, comme nous le savons, ce n'est pas le cas avec le sel celtique. Dans ce fil, il est recommandé de prendre du sel celtique pour minimiser les effets de désintoxication de l'iode. Comme vous l'avez posté dans le fil d'iode, je suppose que vous prenez toujours de l'iode? Si vous êtes, je pense que ce serait une bonne idée de continuer à prendre le sel.

Une bonne question à répondre serait: quels autres facteurs diététiques ou de style de vie pourraient causer votre tension artérielle élevée? Si elle est en fait élevée. Selon le lien Griffin à condition qu'il ne soit pas aussi mauvais que vous l'avez pensé.
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Merci Ant22 pour ta réponse...
Oui, je prends toujours le Lugol 3 gouttes 12%

Depuis le 15 06 16
Directement au lever le matin : Lugol 3 gouttes 12% dans un verre d'eau
1 heure après : ½ cuillère à café de sel marin Celtic dans un grand verre d'eau (je vais donc le reprendre dès demain)
Petit déjeuner : 2 cuillerées à café de Glycine qui adoucit mon thé
Directement avec le petit-déjeuner (bol de thé) : 1 comprimé super vitamine B complexe, 1 comprimé sélénium, 1 comprimé Vitamine A, 1 comprimé Vitamine D 3
Directement après le déjeuner midi : Chardon-Marie 2 comprimés ou 1 comprimé de NAC, 1 comprimé de Zinc, 1 comprimé Probiotic
Dans l'après-midi : 1 cuillerée à café Vitamine C dans un verre d’eau
Avant de dormir : magnésium 1 comprimé


Thanks Ant22 for your answer ...
Yes, I always take Lugol 3 drops 12%

Since 15 06 16
Directly at dawn in the morning: Lugol 3 drops 12% in a glass of water
1 hour after: ½ teaspoon celtic sea salt in a large glass of water (I'll take it back tomorrow) [/ b]
Breakfast: 2 teaspoons of Glycine that soften my tea
Directly with breakfast (tea bowl): 1 super vitamin B complex tablet, 1 tablet selenium, 1 tablet Vitamin A, 1 tablet Vitamin D 3
Directly after lunch noon: Milk thistle 2 tablets or 1 tablet of NAC, 1 tablet of Zinc, 1 tablet Probiotic
In the afternoon: 1 teaspoon Vitamin C in a glass of water
Before sleeping: magnesium 1 tablet
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
PERLOU said:
Merci Griffin pour votre réponse et votre lien...
D'après ce lien, 15 de tension en France est de 112.50 aux Etats Unis ce qui semble est tout à fait normal...
J'aurai 62 ans bientôt...
I don't know in France, but sometimes 150 mmHg of systolic blood pressure is shortened to two digits, 15. But the French and others use different measuring units for blood glucose levels, cholesterol, etc. So, I'm not sure what your doctor was referring to.

On the other hand, there's evidence that salt restriction raises levels of renin, an enzyme that helps raise blood pressure. See more information here:

https://www.sott.net/article/349279-Study-finds-higher-salt-intake-is-associated-with-lower-blood-pressure-contradicting-decades-of-medical-advice

It's good that you are monitored and I don't see why you should not continue with your experiment. But clarifying the blood pressure, taken either at home or in a health center, would be useful.
 

Dioxic

A Disturbance in the Force
hi PERLOU,

Je lis actuellement "The Arginine Solution". Si vous êtes préoccupé par votre tension artérielle, il pourrait être utile d'enquêter sur l'arginine.

Il peut augmenter la production d'oxyde nitrique qui est responsable de la relaxation des vaisseaux sanguins. Apparemment, au fur et à mesure que nous vieillissons, le corps est moins efficace pour produire du NO et une supplémentation avec de l'arginine peut être utile.

Excuses pour la traduction google, mon français est insuffisant!

-------------

I am currently reading "The Arginine Solution". If you are worried about your blood pressure, it could be worth investigating Arginine.

It can increase Nitric Oxide production which is responsible for relaxing blood vessels. Apparently, as we age, the body is less efficient at producing NO and supplementing with Arginine can be of assistance.

--------------

Links:
https://www.argininecardio.com/why-arginine-cardio-reduces-blood-pressure.php
https://no-more-heart-disease.com/nitric-oxide-and-blood-pressure
https://www.amazon.fr/Arginine-Solution-Americas-Cardio-Enhancing-Supplement/dp/0446523909/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1498664204&sr=8-1&keywords=arginine+solution
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Merci Gaby pour ce lien si intéressant...

Thanks Gaby for this interesting link ...




Merci Kaki pour tes liens que j'étudie à l'instant...
Je ne lis et parle que le Français et ce livre n'est pas traduit...
Prenant déjà L-arginine, j'ai trouvé un lien sur Amazon France pour L-citruline :
https://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/B01ALQN6GC/ref=ox_sc_mini_detail?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1SX05XGVB6JC9

Thank you Kaki for your links that I study at the moment ...
I only read and speak French and this book is not translated ...
Taking L-arginine already, I found a link on Amazon France for L-citrulin:
https://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/B01ALQN6GC/ref=ox_sc_mini_detail?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1SX05XGVB6JC9
 

Heather

Jedi
Hi everyone.

I'm wondering if anyone here knows the best way to approach Hashimoto's disease. In my last blood test my Anti Thyroglobulin antibodies are high, as is Thyroid Peroxidase, TPO. My doctor suggested it's Hashimoto's, and I'm doing more blood work probably next week.

I'm re-reading Brownstein on this but if someone here is experienced in this area I'd appreciate a head's up. I suffer from this cloudy brain syndrome, which makes more technical type research a bit difficult and overwhelming at times.

I did do a 24 hour urine test for iodine and I'm not as deficient in iodine as I would have thought. You want to see 90% of the 50 mg Iodoral tablet returned in the urine and mine was 83%. Not nearly as bad as I thought.

I have taken some Iodoral off and on in the past -- not a great deal though. I'm holding off until I understand better what I need to do.

I just found someone by the name of Dr. Richard Hagmeyer on Youtube. His website states too much iodine can be an underlying cause of Hashimoto's, whereas Brownstein states the opposite.

Anyway, I will continue looking into it, but if anyone here has some experience with this I'd be grateful for some advice.
 
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